;articles

mashable.com
Carrie Fisher once sent a cow tongue to a sexually inappropriate Hollywood producer
Nothing but respect for MY general.
By Proma Khosla

Even after her death Carrie Fisher is having none of your bullshit.

Heather Ross, a friend of Fisher’s, spoke to a local radio station in Tucson, AZ. about her experience with sexual assault in Hollywood. On the 94.9 Morning Mix, Ross recalled inappropriate advances from a big name producer and how Fisher made clear she had a zero-tolerance policy for that kind of behavior.

After Ross was assaulted by “an Oscar-winning producer” – not Weinstein, but another – Fisher was furious. After the initial shock and fear wore off, Fisher ran into the producer at Sony and delivered him a package.

“It was a cow tongue from Jerry’s Famous Deli with a note that said, ‘If you ever touch my darling Heather or any other woman again, the next delivery will be something of yours in a much smaller box.’”

The cow tongue was all Fisher’s idea, natch, and she made sure to deliver it in person and watch him open the box.

"That’s just how she was,” Ross said. “I miss her dearly. She stood up for people.”

“That’s who Carrie Fisher was,” she added. “She put things out there and in your face.”

It’s not just a feeling—it’s an emotion that causes action
— 

It is time to change the meaning of the word 

“love.”

The word is mostly used according to the first definition given in the dictionary: 

“an intense feeling of deep affection.” 

In other words, love is what one feels.

After years spent speaking with couples before, during and after marriage; and of talking to parents and children struggling with their relationships, I am convinced of the partiality of the definition. 

Love should be seen not as a feeling but as an enacted emotion. To love is to feel and act lovingly.

Too many women have told me, bruises visible on their faces, that the husbands who struck them love them. Since they see love as a feeling, the word hides the truth, which is that you do not love someone whom you repeatedly beat and abuse. You may have very strong feelings about them, you may even believe you cannot live without them, but you do not love them.

The first love mentioned in the Bible is not romantic love, but parental love (Genesis 22). When a child is born, the parent’s reaction to this person, who so recently did not exist, is to feel that 

“I would do anything for her.” 

In the doing is the love—the feeling is enacted. That is why we often hear the phrase 

“you don’t act like you love me.” 

We know in our bones that love is not a feeling alone, but a feeling that flows into the world in action.

Between human beings, love is a relational word. Yes, you can love things that do not love you back—the sky or a mountain or a painting or the game of chess. But the love of other people is directional. There is a lover and a beloved—you don’t just love, but you love at someone. And real love is not only about the feelings of the lover; it is not egotism. It is when one person believes in another person and shows it.

In Fiddler on the Roof, when Tevye asks Golde whether she loves him after a quarter century of marriage, her wry answer is exactly on point:

For twenty-five years I’ve washed your clothes
Cooked your meals, cleaned the house
Given you children, milked your cow
She asks then, 

“If that’s not love, what is?”

Of course it is possible to perform all sorts of duties for someone and feel little or nothing for them. 

Love is not about being hired help. Love is not an obligation done with a cold soul. But neither is it a passion that expresses itself in cruelty, or one that does not express itself at all. The feeling must be wedded to the deed.

We would have a healthier conception of love if we understood that love, like parenting or friendship, is a feeling that expresses itself in action. What we really feel is reflected in what we do. 

The poet’s song is dazzling and the passion powerful, but the deepest beauty of love is how it changes lives.

via David Wolpe

BTS Answers Fans’ Biggest Burning Questions – And RM Reveals Why He Changed His Name From Rap Monster!

It’s all about ARMY!

ET’s Denny Directo sat down with BTS on Wednesday at rehearsals for their upcoming performance at Sunday’s 2017 American Music Awards, where they spilled on love, world tour plans, new music, and answered some of their fans’ most burning questions.

From what’s on their playlist, to pet peeves, to J-Hope’s upcoming mixtape, scroll down to get all the BTS scoop!

1. What’s your favorite song right now?

SUGA: “Havana” [by Camila Cabello]!
RM: Me and J-Hope’s favorite song [is] “Gucci Gang” [by Lil Pump].
JUNGKOOK: “Perfect” [by Ed Sheeran].

2. Have you been to In-N-Out?

RM: We did like, four years ago. The first time in L.A., we just arrived in the airport and then we had to go to In-N-Out right away.

3. You guys are like brothers. Is there a habit someone has that gets on your nerves?

RM: [V] always plays games, but with the microphone. He’s always like, “Ahhhh!” or something like that.
V: “Ah!” or “Yay!” or “Wow!” or “Uh!”
RM: He really does that, and I’m sharing my room with him. Yeah, it’s annoying, so I think we got to move onto a better apartment or something.

4. Where do you see BTS in 10 years?

J-HOPE: Happy birthday, BTS!
RM: Maybe like, Bulletproof Adults or something.
JUNGKOOK: Uncle. Uncle!
V: BTS uncles!
JIN: Yeah!

5. Any plans for solo projects? What about J-Hope’s mixtape?

RM: It’s coming. It’s coming.
JIMIN: J-Hope!
J-HOPE: It’s coming home.
RM: There will be a like, huge surprise for everyone. Like, I know. It’s coming. [Jungkook] just got his studio room. He started to produce some beats, so maybe we can expect some stuff from JK.

6. If you could say anything to your younger selves, when you were just starting the group, what would it be?

RM: Please change your name! Please change your hair. Put away those sunglasses.
JH: J-Hope, you everyday awesome!

7. Why did you change your hair?

J-HOPE: I did it for AMAs! Red color, fire!
V: I’m grey hair color.
RM: He said his color just got some darker, so he did it again.

8. RM, you mentioned your name change. What does RM mean to you?

RM: [Rap Monster] came from a song that I made from like, 2012, there was some phrase like Rap Monster, and I just, I thought it was so cool. But as I grow up, and as I came to America, I think it felt like too much. So I just abbreviated it to RM, and it could symbolize many things. It could have more spectrums to it. I don’t know [what it means], like “Real Me” or something.

© Jennifer Drysdale‍ @ Entertainment Tonight

In New Zealand, a Translated ‘Moana’ Bolsters an Indigenous Language

AUCKLAND, New Zealand — The families lined up at the theater above a shopping mall here in New Zealand’s biggest city and filed past posters for Stephen King’s “It” and “Captain Underpants” for a film unlike any they had ever seen — the Disney hit “Moana,” translated into the indigenous language of New Zealand.

“Kei te pehea koe?” said the ticket taker, Jane Paul, greeting groups of children with a phrase meaning, “How are you?”

“Are you Maori too?” one girl asked.

About 125,000 of New Zealand’s 4.7 million people speak the Maori language, or “te reo Māori,” as it is widely rendered here. There are concerns that numbers are declining, putting it at risk of dying out. But with one in three Maori people in New Zealand younger than 15, experts said the chance for youth to see a wildly popular movie in their own words could turn the language’s fortunes around after more official efforts faltered.

“The language has got to be made cool and sexy and relevant to young people, and this movie is the perfect way to make that happen,” said Haami Piripi, a former head of the government body charged with promoting te reo Māori as a living language.

Taika Waititi, a New Zealand writer and director who worked on the original English-language version of “Moana,” also approached Disney early on about translating the film, and his sister, Tweedie Waititi, went on to produce the translated version.

The film was screened free at 30 theaters around New Zealand at the end of the annual Maori language week. It did not have English subtitles, but screenings were fully booked within 30 minutes, leading to plans in at least one town for additional showings.

Many of those attending in Manukau, in southern Auckland, said they had never seen a film at the theater entirely in their language before.

…Parents entering the theater said they relished the chance for their children to see themselves and their language reflected on the big screen, in a different kind of story that they hoped would instill pride in being Maori.

Most of the efforts to revitalize the language that have worked so far, he added, have been initiated by protest or court action. But Mr. Piripi said the film “Moana reo Māori” had given him hope there was another way: making the language “cool, relevant and useful” to young Maori.

“There’s no other film in the Maori language that would attract whanau and kids like that,” he said, using the word for families.

The entire process, including translation, recording the voices and mixing the sound, happened over three months.

Katarina Edmonds, a senior lecturer in Maori education at the University of Auckland, and one of three people who translated the film, said the team worked not only to find the exact equivalents of words in the Disney script, but also to remain true to the Maori language and tikanga, or cultural values.

Some moments of the film posed a challenge; Moana raging at the ocean, for example, contravened a Maori cultural rule to never curse or turn one’s back on the sea, so they turned it into a more humorous moment using careful wordplay.

At the same time, Ms. Edmonds said, the translation gave the film a uniquely Maori flavor of humor, while staying true to the spirit of the original script.

Rachel House, a New Zealand actor who voiced the character Gramma Tala in both the English and Maori versions of the film — and who was also the performance director of the Maori production — said she had been blown away by the response to the film, and the 30 theaters that screened it free.

“I’ve been on a very slow journey with the language for years, and now I feel like I can sit back and really enjoy the film, and experience the learning tool that it represents,” she said.

In Manukau, most families left the theater beaming. Many said they were eager to buy a DVD of the film, which is expected sometime in the next few months.

Desiree Tipene, 30, said that having grown up with immersion schooling, she was determined to give her children a similar experience — for a sense of identity and spiritual connection. She described “Moana” as a “funny and beautiful” way for her four children to connect with their culture.

“I just enjoy our language being spoken,” she said.

[!] BTS sets new record for with 1,203,533 album sales for LOVE YOURSELF 承 ‘Her’ in 13 days

They are the first artist in 16 years to have surpassed 1,200,000 album sales based on single album sales within the month of its release. This is also the largest number of album sales in the history of the Gaon Chart.

TO UNDERSTAND BTS’ U.S SCHEDULE:

On November 15, BTS will do a live outdoors performance for Jimmy Kimmel Live. The concert will be included in a later episode of the late-night show on November 20.

November 17 will see BTS do a live radio show in the U.S. The group will be speaking with Mario Lopez on the actor’s show ON.

As for November 19, BTS will be busy with the American Music Awards themselves. The group will be performing live on-stage during the event and walk its red carpet beforehand. BTS is slated to perform “DNA,” the first single off their recent album Love Yourself.

A day after the American Music Awards, BTS will then appear on Jimmy Kimmel Live on November 20. The following day will see the group do their recording for The Ellen DeGeneres Show. The latter episode is expected to debut on November 27.

November 24 will also see BTS take part in another special event with two popular U.S. artists. The group will release a remix of their song “Mic Drop” with Steve Aoki and Desiigner this month. There is no word from BigHit Entertainment if the drop will come with any accompanying music video or release party in the U.S. BTS is slated to attend the Mnet Asian Music Awards on December 1, so the group’s time in America will be very short but jam-packed with events for fans.

Find BTS’ US schedule HERE

Why you’re not improving your art

Have you ever felt like your art is on the same level for a long time? Have you ever felt like you can’t grow your skills. Have you ever felt like everyone around you grows in rapid speed and you are just like a snail at the end of the race?

I was thinking about that and trying to pinpoint the reasons why you might feel that way. I figured out some solutions that helped me and some other artists I know.

1. Not looking for critique/feedback

‘You can’t yourself pinpoint things you need to focus on because your eye still isn’t trained enough to pinpoint exact problems.’

This is number one problem I see and many professional artists will tell you about that. You can’t be too shy to show your work to people who can give you good critique. Look for professionals who are willing to help you and use that. Critiquing is mistaken to be something hurtful for young artists BUT in reality people giving feedback are trying to help you grow. I know how hard it is to hear that you are still not good enough, that your art is lacking something. Maybe you know that yourself but you can’t yourself pinpoint things you need to focus on because your eye still isn’t trained enough to pinpoint exact problems. The best person to go to would be professional with trained eyes who is able to say by flipping through your portfolio what it lacks and what you can do to make it look better. Don’t be afraid and seek that help. Don’t be too attached to your own art and accept that it isn’t perfect and you need a fresh pair of eyes to look at it.

2.  Not implementing the feedback

'Implementing is the key step in the process of growing.’

After you have done first step from my list and you finally found a professional willing to give you feedback try to implement feedback. Don’t just listen to it, nod few times pretending you understand what it being said. Don’t defend your art and don’t give excuses if the critique is genuine. Implementing is the key step in the process of growing. There is no use in feedback without you actually trying out the tips you were given. The whole point of that is to change your work. You are not being better artists by collecting thoughts about your art. Now it is time to do the work. It actually requires to put time and effort . Usually what people do,after receiving feedback, is  they pat themselves on back like it was 'job well done’ and being lazy. They are not willing to actually put in the work to implement feedback. It is time consuming and you need to put a lot of effort. Although without that there is not any point in seeking feedback.

3. Not trying/not failing enough

'Embrace failures as a valuable lessons.’

Yes! There is lesson in failure! As hard as it is to understand. Once you collect experience you grow from it and become wiser. You know what path to choose to avoid next time failure. Successful people are the ones that can try something many times before they finally succeed. When they finally succeed it’s just a result of many attempts they have made before. No one is born ready for challenge. People are scared to lose because for our psyche it hurts more than a win feels good. People will try avoid at any cost losing so at some point they give up and stop trying. You can’t say for sure you will be successful artist after you did it for a year and don’t see result. You are not the one deciding how long it takes. It will be done some day. some day you will meet your artistic goals. But you will only meet them by trying and failing probably hundred times on a way. Just don’t be afraid. Those mistakes on a way are path that differentiate you and a professional. They already failed many times to get to where they are now. When you understand that you will embrace failures as a valuable lessons.

4. Doing things that are not  challenging you.

'Feel uncomfortable and pick up this damn pencil and draw like no one else is watching!’

Don’t settle in your comfort zone. You’ve heard that already many times right? That is why. You limit your skillset. Good things come out of comfort zone. If you feel like you have problems drawing something you are probably right. The reason is you don’t challenge yourself enough to draw things that are difficult for you. For example if you are only drawing a boy in front view standing with hands straight it doesn’t sound like the most exciting art right? But what if it’s the only thing you can draw and it looks somewhat decent? Well then, solution for that is easy - experiment with different angles, experiment with expressions, with composition, with different species. Be brave here and discover topics you don’t draw. You art will become more interesting and you will be more confident drawing. Personally I know that this is the hardest part for artists. It is hard to let go of what we know and discover unknown. We feel vulnerable and  like we can’t really draw. This feeling sucks. As much as this feeling sucks you know what else sucks? Sucks that your skills are stagnating. Feel uncomfortable and pick up this damn pencil and draw like no one else is watching! I guarantee that after some time you will be surprised with what you created and how your art have changed.

Good luck to everyone who is on path of improvement!

ibtimes.co.uk
John Carpenter loves Sonic the Hedgehog: 'I even like the one where he turns into a werewolf'
This is not a story I ever expected to write.

John Carpenter is /ourguy/

BTS Explain Concepts Behind ‘Love Yourself: Her’ Album: 'This Is the Beginning of Our Chapter Two’

Mere hours before the release of BTS'Love Yourself: Her, the album’s significance wasn’t lost on the group’s leader, Rap Monster.

“It’s really a huge, big step for us,” the 23-year-old rapper/songwriter/producer told Billboard during a phone call from Seoul. “Of course, every member is so excited about the album. We’ve been just practicing until now, day and night, to show these new songs and perfected performances. I left a message on our fan cafe, the other day, after we finished that 'this EP will mark the turning point of BTS’ and even though the wait felt really long with this album – I think it was the huge event, the BBMAs, were in May – so much has happened.”

The wait has been particularly anticipated for for the band’s famously passionate fan base, known as Army, who have been waiting for new tracks from Rap Monster, Jimin, Suga, J-Hope, Jin, V and Jungkook band after voting them Top Social Artist at the 2017 Billboard Music Awards over fellow pop juggernauts Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande, Selena Gomez and Shawn Mendes.

Since then, the BTS guys have landed distribution deals with Amazon and U.S.-based The Orchard (“We believe the physical album, still, really counts and it’s really important to connect with our fans around the world,” Rap Monster said) and hung out with worldwide chart-toppers like Major Lazer, Halsey, Charli XCX(“Maybe it’s just my sixth sense, but I think maybe we will be collaborating with even more interesting artists,” he added); even snagging The Chainsmokers to produce a beat for Love Yourself: Her.

One listen to the tightly produced record – which looks likely to make a big splash on the Billboard 200 next week – and the passion is palpable from the intense lead single “DNA,” the societal commentary in “Go Go,” among multiple lyrics and moments that feel ripped from the members’ personal journals. There’s also loads of passion in Rap Monster’s voice talking about these new songs as he sees and envisions the larger picture and message for his band’s latest batch of forward-thinking EDM, hip-hop and pop tracks. Read on for Billboard’s deeper analysis of Love Yourself: Her with Rap Monster.

Let’s start right from the beginning with “Serendipity.” Why was this the right song to choose as the intro and kick off the era?

When I wrote the lyrics, melodies and the first themes of “Serendipity,” I tried to come up with some rare things you find in life, something very special, like the calico, three-striped cat; things that have extraordinary meanings in people’s lives. I wanted to share this moment.

I was reading the lyrics are gender neutral, which I think is really powerful. Was that a conscious decision?

The lyrics were based on rare and special things in life. So, I thought, those feelings transcend genders, cultures and barriers between people.

We always put out the “Intro” just before releasing our single, so the intro is taking the role of telling the concept of this album. But “Serendipity” was actually the right song to share the feelings of our single, “DNA.” The title is about how our DNA is connected in the universe, I think that was the right feel for this album.

Let’s talk about “DNA.” How does this single continue and progress the story of BTS?

When we’re talking about our title tracks, “DNA” is about the expression of a young, passionate love. The lyrics are like, “The two of us our connected fatefully from the start, our DNA was just the one thing.” At the same time, “DNA” is taking BTS to new ground. We tried to apply new grammar and perspectives – if you listen to the song, you’ll understand what I’m trying to say – it’s very different from our previous music, technically and musically. I believe it’s going to be the starting point of a second chapter of our career; the beginning of our Chapter Two.

“Best of Me” is really impressive. It sounds like The Chainsmokers, but it also sounds like BTS. You didn’t lose yourself which isn’t easy when collaborating with new artists. What was that process like?

I love that track! We met them at BBMAs, we were so lucky. Actually, they invited us to their concert just the other day – they had a huge concert in Korea and we sang “Closer” together. For “Best of Me,” they gave us several tracks and samples months ago, we and our producers picked one sample, like, “Okay, this is fit for our next album.” So we worked on it, we sent it to them, we asked them what they think of the track we developed and got their opinions. And we made it! I’m so excited for it. [Laughs]

Your albums always have deeper social and society commentaries. Let’s talk about some of the topics with this release. “Go Go” instantly comes to mind.

“Go Go” is a trendy song, but it’s about how our young generation are living their lives with low expectations and standards so people are upset with reality; they have little hope and there’s so much economic hardship. We wanted to say something about it and emphasize to the world that it’s not their choice, but brutal reality that forces people to live and spend as if there’s no future.

But in Korea, “YOLO” has become a big key word for young people because we don’t have money and it’s really hard to get a chance to earn a lot of money. I think society has a lot of problems for young people. Young people spend their money on claw crane machines at arcades and they spend like $30 on trying to win these dolls. And then it’s like, “Oh! I spent all my money…shit. But I don’t regret.” That’s the biggest luxury for Korea’s young people: collecting accessories, cosmetics, that’s what they think is a luxury. It’s “YOLO” because it’s like, “I’m gonna buy all this! I’m gonna buy all this food and I’m going to eat it! I’m going to do it!” I think it’s sad because it’s all we can. “Go Go” is just saying, “Okay, just do it, we won’t regret it. Just spend several bucks on the machine and eat the food!” But at the same time, the song is very easily to sing along to so I think many people will like that song, especially if they find the deeper meaning.

Of course, I have to ask about making a skit interlude out of your BBMAs acceptance speech.

You need to hear “Mic Drop” because the skit was my speech at BBMAs –  because that was a big moment for our history – and then we put “Mic Drop” next to that because it’s like a flex – like, “Okay, we’re done. We don’t need to give a shit about anything.” That was the right skit and follow-up song for this album.

The last song, “Outro: Her” really spoke to me. It almost reads like a diary.

Ha! [Laughs]

After talking with you, it feels like it recaps the whole album and is really introspective.

I think that was the fastest work I did for this album. I wrote the verse in 20 minutes; it just came, very truthfully, from the bottom of my heart. I thought it was the right outro for this album because it is really a range of emotions – I’m saying I met this person that I really love, this person is the love of my life right now, I’m saying that I was confused and I was looking for love and this world is complex. But I think it’s you so, “I call you 'her,’ 'cause you’re my tear.” “I think you’re the start and the end of me.” That’s what I’m saying: You’re my wonder, but you’re also my answers. You’re my “her,” but you’re still the “tear.”

The hook is saying that love is not all about the happiness, it’s just not just about the joy, it’s not just about delight. If you want to love a person, you should know that there are tears and there can even be hatred inside of it. I think a love really includes all of that. That’s what I was trying to say. It’s complex.

And if fans are so lucky to own the physical album, they’ll hear two hidden tracks at the very. Why keep them secretive?

I think they’re hidden because you have to be a real fan of BTS to understand them. Otherwise, you won’t. Otherwise, you’d like be, “Why are they feeling so confused about things? They’re good?!? They’re No. 1 somewhere, they have so much stuff, why are they worried?” People always talk about that. But if you are true fan of BTS and you buy the album and you listen to the hidden track – if you are an Army and we spent time together from 2013, 2014 – they could understand. It’s kind of more special, more closer, to our true hearts.

© Jeff Benjamin @ Billboard

BTS Spill Details on Their Upcoming World Tour – Plus, Will They Ever Record Music in English?

BTS has definitely gone global.

The Korean boy band was greeted by hundreds of fans at LAX airport on Tuesday as they landed in the U.S. ahead of their performance at Sunday's2017 American Music Awards – and has plans to take their show on the road to meet even more of America’s ARMY.

“Our fans, ARMY, I love you,” J-Hope told ET’s Denny Directo during an interview at their AMAs rehearsal on Wednesday, as the band opened up about their upcoming 2018 world tour.

“We will visit more cities, and I think we will definitely be like, adding more stages. I don’t know the particular time of when we will be coming back [to the U.S.], but it will definitely be doper and bigger,” RM revealed. “It’s gonna really happen.”

“Yeah, of course,” J-Hope added of whether he, RM, Jin, Jimin, Jungkook, V and Suga plan to perform tour dates in Europe and Brazil as well.

“We just finished this tour named Wings, and I think it is going to be like, a new series for the tour, so of course including United States, it’ll happen, I think. I hope it will happen everywhere, every continent,” RM shared. “We want it too.”

Recording music in English might be less of a priority for the group, through they’re definitely breaking into the U.S. market.

“We’re releasing our new song, ‘MIC Drop’ remix with Steve Aoki and Desiigner next week. It’s going to be like, an English version of something, so I think we will try some versions like that later,” RM explained, as the band dished on who they hope to collaborate next.

J-Hope and the guys pressured Jungkook to reveal his love for Justin Bieber, which he confirmed. “Yeah.”

V, meanwhile, revealed his desire to work with Daniel Caesar. “I love him,” he raved.

As for RM’s wishlist? That would be “Sabrina Claudio, Drake and, of course, Migos.”

For now, however, the group is focused on their upcoming AMAs performance – which RM teased they couldn’t be more “ready” for.

“We’re going to do it like we always have been,” he declared.

© Jennifer Drysdale‍ @ Entertainment Tonight

NAMJOON FINALLY REVEALS WHAT ‘RM’ STANDS FOR NOW:

Q. RM, you mentioned your name change. What does RM mean to you?

RM: [Rap Monster] came from a song that I made from like, 2012, there was some phrase like Rap Monster, and I just, I thought it was so cool. But as I grow up, and as I came to America, I think it felt like too much. So I just abbreviated it to RM, and it could symbolize many things. It could have more spectrums to it. I don’t know [what it means], like “Real Me” or something.

Steve Aoki said, “We’re working on some fun stuff”. He added “I love these guys. These guys are the geniuses,” he said. “They’re so creative on every level – on their dance, on their sound, on their style, their flow, creatively musically, creatively on the fashion tip. They’re brand developers. They developed their own brand, and they’re global. It’s incredible working with artists like that.”

“These are the times that try men’s souls.”

President Trump has earned an express pass to the nether world, according to “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda.

The playwright and songwriter said Trump, facing intense criticism for the federal response to Hurricane Maria, is “going straight to hell” after spending Saturday tweeting nearly hourly about media coverage of recovery efforts and accusing Puerto Rican officials of wanting “everything to be done for them.”

Miranda made the proclamation after the President, from the confines of his New Jersey golf resort, shared a snarky personal attack against the mayor of San Juan, accusing her of playing politics after a heartfelt plea for help.

At least 16 people have died in the U.S. territory in the harrowing 10 days since the Category 4 storm roared ashore.

Council Speaker Mark-Viverito says despair hitting Puerto Rico
Residents, left with no electricity, fuel, food and water, have been frustrated by the pace of relief efforts and critics have blamed Trump for the slow federal response.

“I’m a ticking time bomb on the verge of exploding,” said Adeline Vazquez, 53, who needs a ventilator for respiratory problems and whose building in the western city of Mayaguez does not have enough fuel to run a generator 24 hours a day.

More than half of the 3.4 million people who live on the island have no access to drinking water, and 95 percent remain without power, officials said. Many roads remain impassable, making it difficult to get food, water and fuel around the island.