99 percent of

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Have you ever found yourself wanting a metric ton of DAI music? Have you ever thought to yourself, aw man, DAI’s soundtrack was 15 hours shorter than I wanted it to be? If that sounds like you, then this is a link for you.

I’ve ripped all the music from this game - that is, all the ambient snippets of music that you hear while running around in the world, and all the music that happens in cutscenes - and it turns out there’s 16 hours (1.6 gigs) of it.

(- here’s the download link -)

So if you’ve found yourself wishing you had the heaps of music that never made it to the official soundtrack, you can now roll around in hours of it. 

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(Link to Tweet) (Table Source)

“Sitting Republican senators have received $115,000 from Betsy DeVos herself, and more than $950,000 from the full DeVos clan since 1980. In the past two election cycles alone, her family has donated $8.3 million to Republican Party super PACs.”

– Here’s How Much Betsy DeVos And Her Family Paid To Back GOP Senators Who Will Support Her

Friendly reminder: This is what Trump thinks of Autistic people

“I’ll tell you what autism is. In 99 percent of the cases, it’s a brat who hasn’t been told to cut the act out. That’s what autism is. What do you mean they scream and they’re silent? They don’t have a father around to tell them, ‘Don’t act like a moron. You’ll get nowhere in life. Stop acting like a putz. Straighten up. Act like a man. Don’t sit there crying and screaming, idiot.” 

— Mike Savage, Trump’s appointment to head the NIH

MBTI types as Inspirobot quotes:

Note: made this with @rest-in-agreste. Inspirobot is an artificial intelligence (just like cleverbot) that creates senseless random quotes.

INTJ

„Friends are created to suck the life out of your hidden potential.“

“Public education can be similar to a laboratory experiment. It feels normal after a while.”

“There is no such thing as kindness, just death sentence.”

“Nothing is as beautiful as fresh blood.”

“What if delicacies are delicacies because you don’t know any better?”

“With limited masterpiece comes limited mystery.”

“If you value appreciation you have to value polar bears as well.”

INTP

„Ordering an elephant in order to torture a chimp is not as weird for the chimp as it is for the elephant.“

“Education is just opium in space.”

“Happiness is just like the inside of a whale, although not for everyone except idiots.”

“Politics are like a tea party; nobody cries until you give them a singing pickle.”

“You don’t need a projector in order to raise the dead.”

“Every time you laugh at procrastination, you also laugh at groins.”

“The register is on top of the hierarchy.”

ENTJ

„When you’re around young people, don’t forget to crush your enemies.”

“Control earth!”

“Finding inner peace is not a question of ‘how passionate’, but ‘with what army’.”

“If you understand how to hate it, you understand how to sterilize it.”

“Politics is fun if power is your passion.”

“In the modern world efficiency is as rare as leprechaun cake.”

“The axis of success is made of intimidation, willpower and Italy.”

ENTP

„The geniuses who sacrifice the financial elite are just as bad as the geniuses who have no idea how to sacrifice old people.”

“Life is short. Die.”

“Ridicule facial hair. Ridicule the law.”

“’Patent office’ is latin and means ‘whore house’.”

“Democracy is very much like a box of chocolate. Useless.”

“There ain’t no love like the love for the weed.”

“The devil is a beautiful flower.”

INFP

„Trust is 1 percent groping and 99 percent mindfulness.“

“Smelly feet are like Satan, they make us feel pain in a way no one could’ve ever imagined.”

“A lot of men wish to become husbands because it’s all a game to them.”

“If you ever feel sad, you need more quotes.”

“If I call you, I don’t call you because cucumber.”

“The price of the north is not a price the society is going to pay.”

“Mooses are red, Cowboys are blue, the government is cruel and this fact is true.”

INFJ

“Between the wind and your pretty face lies the human race.”

“Our body fluids begin, when we learn to say ‘no’ to social structures.”

“Chemistry can be similar to a public toilet, it eats you up from the inside.”

“The world is made of crime and polka dot dresses.”

“The seals are not poop if you believe in Christmas.”

“The Russians, beware.”

“If you can’t afford to lose your printer you should make sure to pray to god.”

ENFJ

“Hunt. Hate. Hunt evil.”

“The more we eat cake, the more we love our life.”

“Don’t believe in your girlfriend’s loneliness. Just go outside.”

“When you seek to be taken for who you are, ask.”

“The funniest poems are those that hide murder in it.”

“Whenever I look at the beautiful sun I want it to turn black.”

“If you need a hero, go find the barista.”

ENFP

“I usually love hugs but hugs doesn’t love me.”

“Keep eating.”

“A man is not lasagna until he is loved.”

“A good friend is someone who is octopus.”

“She was a lonely girl until she found a lonely puppy.”

“Move your feet on the tree trunk.”

“The weed is real.”

ISTJ

“Corruption will only end if we end horseback riding.”

“The only thing you need to achieve spiritual healing is a beautiful body and a deck of cards.”

“Buy electricity when winter arrives.”

“7665.”

“Tired of all the lies, promises and doors.”

“I work for the child.”

“A kind heart is worth more than a chess game.”

ISFJ

“Never give up, pretend and look at your own grave.”

“My love for plant growing is eternal, just like the lemons.”

“Heaven is reincarnation, metaphorically speaking.”

“The alcohol is not good but it wants to be good for me.”

“Travelling is the heaven to the cross.”

“And one day everybody leaves for the cooking.”

“Snails are in the trains.”

ESTJ

“The fluids the French.”

“Between constitution and law lies the yeti.”

“A personal assistant is not the same as balance alone in an empty field.”

“We cannot transform ourselves by drawing, only by infecting.”

“A beautiful person is a beautiful subordinate.”

“Envy is not the best feminism.”

“One day you’re going to wake up next to the dog of your dreams.”

ESFJ

“The only difference between a horse and a riddle is that a riddle doesn’t fear death.”

“If you really want to seem like somebody you’re not, you must know how to think positive.”

“The news are not real.”

“Everyone is a book with a murdering ending.”

“We mature with the Russians not with the years.”

“Always be kind and eventually grave will be rewarded for it.”

“Watch out when he finds you at night.”

ISTP

“Don’t despise death.”

“The flat earth. Made of people?”

“If you are talking about a bad marriage, you are a killer.”

“Between humanity and a near death experience lies abuse.”

“On Monday, whatever you have envied can’t be unenvied.”

“It’s practical to be a bush.”

“I am a bottle full of liquorish.”

ISFP

Maybe our souls can be beauty someday?”

“Support passion.”

“Artists paint with passion while murderers paint with blood.”

“Music is the best comfort when period.”

“And slowly my tears turn into colors.”

“When I dance my feet are camping.”

“I close my step-aunt and let it go.”

ESTP

„Try to make it so, that somebody cries in the night.“

“You are a pathetic piece of meat.”

“Time doesn’t quit heroin.”

“Earth is just a silver coin going in circles.”

“We cannot change the system through talking, we can only change the system through being pathetic.”

“With actual deals come actual diseases.”

“Alternative facts are geological lifestyle.”

ESFP

„Where elections end, erections begin.“

“Don’t stop rubbing.”

“Don’t rely on your boyfriend’s jealousy, just jump.”

“After the young woman comes the love making.”

“You are good for sex but not good for documentation.”

“Shout it grateful, because all the outlet is a stage.”

“Welcome to the show doesn’t mean welcome to the tragedy.”

10 People You Wish You Met from 100 Years of NASA’s Langley

Something happened 100 years ago that changed forever the way we fly. And then the way we explore space. And then how we study our home planet. That something was the establishment of what is now NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Founded just three months after America’s entry into World War I, Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory was established as the nation’s first civilian facility focused on aeronautical research. The goal was, simply, to “solve the fundamental problems of flight.”

From the beginning, Langley engineers devised technologies for safer, higher, farther and faster air travel. Top-tier talent was hired. State-of-the-art wind tunnels and supporting infrastructure was built. Unique solutions were found.

Langley researchers developed the wing shapes still used today in airplane design. Better propellers, engine cowlings, all-metal airplanes, new kinds of rotorcraft and helicopters, faster-than-sound flight - these were among Langley’s many groundbreaking aeronautical advances spanning its first decades.

By 1958, Langley’s governing organization, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or NACA, would become NASA, and Langley’s accomplishments would soar from air into space.

Here are 10 people you wish you met from the storied history of Langley:

Robert R. “Bob” Gilruth (1913–2000) 

  • Considered the father of the U.S. manned space program.
  • He helped organize the Manned Spacecraft Center – now the Johnson Space Center – in Houston, Texas. 
  • Gilruth managed 25 crewed spaceflights, including Alan Shepard’s first Mercury flight in May 1961, the first lunar landing by Apollo 11 in July 1969, the dramatic rescue of Apollo 13 in 1970, and the Apollo 15 mission in July 1971.

Christopher C. “Chris” Kraft, Jr. (1924-) 

  • Created the concept and developed the organization, operational procedures and culture of NASA’s Mission Control.
  • Played a vital role in the success of the final Apollo missions, the first manned space station (Skylab), the first international space docking (Apollo-Soyuz Test Project), and the first space shuttle flights.

Maxime “Max” A. Faget (1921–2004) 

  • Devised many of the design concepts incorporated into all U.S.  manned spacecraft.
  • The author of papers and books that laid the engineering foundations for methods, procedures and approaches to spaceflight. 
  • An expert in safe atmospheric reentry, he developed the capsule design and operational plan for Project Mercury, and made major contributions to the Apollo Program’s basic command module configuration.

Caldwell Johnson (1919–2013) 

  • Worked for decades with Max Faget helping to design the earliest experimental spacecraft, addressing issues such as bodily restraint and mobility, personal hygiene, weight limits, and food and water supply. 
  • A key member of NASA’s spacecraft design team, Johnson established the basic layout and physical contours of America’s space capsules.

William H. “Hewitt” Phillips (1918–2009) 

  • Provided solutions to critical issues and problems associated with control of aircraft and spacecraft. 
  • Under his leadership, NASA Langley developed piloted astronaut simulators, ensuring the success of the Gemini and Apollo missions. Phillips personally conceived and successfully advocated for the 240-foot-high Langley Lunar Landing Facility used for moon-landing training, and later contributed to space shuttle development, Orion spacecraft splashdown capabilities and commercial crew programs.

Katherine Johnson (1918-) 

  • Was one of NASA Langley’s most notable “human computers,” calculating the trajectory analysis for Alan Shepard’s May 1961 mission, Freedom 7, America’s first human spaceflight. 
  • She verified the orbital equations controlling the capsule trajectory of John Glenn’s Friendship 7 mission from blastoff to splashdown, calculations that would help to sync Project Apollo’s lunar lander with the moon-orbiting command and service module. 
  • Johnson also worked on the space shuttle and the Earth Resources Satellite, and authored or coauthored 26 research reports.

Dorothy Vaughan (1910–2008) 

  • Was both a respected mathematician and NASA’s first African-American manager, head of NASA Langley’s segregated West Area Computing Unit from 1949 until 1958. 
  • Once segregated facilities were abolished, she joined a racially and gender-integrated group on the frontier of electronic computing. 
  • Vaughan became an expert FORTRAN programmer, and contributed to the Scout Launch Vehicle Program.

William E. Stoney Jr. (1925-) 

  • Oversaw the development of early rockets, and was manager of a NASA Langley-based project that created the Scout solid-propellant rocket. 
  • One of the most successful boosters in NASA history, Scout and its payloads led to critical advancements in atmospheric and space science. 
  • Stoney became chief of advanced space vehicle concepts at NASA headquarters in Washington, headed the advanced spacecraft technology division at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, and was engineering director of the Apollo Program Office.

Israel Taback (1920–2008) 

  • Was chief engineer for NASA’s Lunar Orbiter program. Five Lunar Orbiters circled the moon, three taking photographs of potential Apollo landing sites and two mapping 99 percent of the lunar surface. 
  • Taback later became deputy project manager for the Mars Viking project. Seven years to the day of the first moon landing, on July 20, 1976, Viking 1 became NASA’s first Martian lander, touching down without incident in western Chryse Planitia in the planet’s northern equatorial region.

John C Houbolt (1919–2014) 

  • Forcefully advocated for the lunar-orbit-rendezvous concept that proved the vital link in the nation’s successful Apollo moon landing. 
  • In 1963, after the lunar-orbit-rendezvous technique was adopted, Houbolt left NASA for the private sector as an aeronautics, astronautics and advanced-technology consultant. 
  • He returned to Langley in 1976 to become its chief aeronautical scientist. During a decades-long career, Houbolt was the author of more than 120 technical publications.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

nytimes.com
Opinion | Stop Pretending You’re Not Rich
Forget the 1 percent for a moment. It’s the top fifth that rules.
By Richard V. Reeves

When I was growing up, my mother would sometimes threaten my brother and me with elocution lessons. It is no secret that how you talk matters a lot in a class-saturated society like the United Kingdom. Peterborough, our increasingly diverse hometown, was prosperous enough, but not upscale. Six in 10 of the city’s residents voted for Brexit — a useful inverse poshness indicator. (In Thursday’s general election, Peterborough returned a Labour MP for the first time since 2001.)

Our mother, from a rural working-class background herself, wanted us to be able to rise up the class ladder, unencumbered by the wrong accent. The elocution lessons never materialized, but we did have to attend ballroom dancing lessons on Saturday mornings. She didn’t want us to put a foot wrong there, either.

As it turned out, my brother and I did just fine, in no small part because of the stable, loving, middle-class home in which we were raised. Any lingering working-class traces in my own accent were wiped away by three disinfectant years at Oxford. My wife claims they resurface when I drink, but she doesn’t know what she’s talking about — she’s American.

I always found the class consciousness of Britain depressing. It is one of the reasons we brought our British-born sons to America. Here, class is quaint, something to observe in wonder through imported TV shows like “Downton Abbey” or “The Crown.”

So imagine my horror at discovering that the United States is more calcified by class than Britain, especially toward the top. The big difference is that most of the people on the highest rung in America are in denial about their privilege. The American myth of meritocracy allows them to attribute their position to their brilliance and diligence, rather than to luck or a rigged system. At least posh people in England have the decency to feel guilty.

In Britain, it is politically impossible to be prime minister and send your children to the equivalent of a private high school. Even Old Etonian David Cameron couldn’t do it. In the United States, the most liberal politician can pay for a lavish education in the private sector. Some of my most progressive friends send their children to $30,000-a-year high schools. The surprise is not that they do it. It is that they do it without so much as a murmur of moral disquiet.

Beneath a veneer of classlessness, the American class reproduction machine operates with ruthless efficiency. In particular, the upper middle class is solidifying. This favored fifth at the top of the income distribution, with an average annual household income of $200,000, has been separating from the 80 percent below. Collectively, this top fifth has seen a $4 trillion-plus increase in pretax income since 1979, compared to just over $3 trillion for everyone else. Some of those gains went to the top 1 percent. But most went to the 19 percent just beneath them.

The rhetoric of “We are the 99 percent” has in fact been dangerously self-serving, allowing people with healthy six-figure incomes to convince themselves that they are somehow in the same economic boat as ordinary Americans, and that it is just the so-called super rich who are to blame for inequality.

Politicians and policy wonks worry about the persistence of poverty across generations, but affluence is inherited more strongly. Most disturbing, we now know how firmly class positions are being transmitted across generations. Most of the children born into households in the top 20 percent will stay there or drop only as far as the next quintile. As Gary Solon, one of the leading scholars of social mobility, put it recently, “Rather than a poverty trap, there seems instead to be more stickiness at the other end: a ‘wealth trap,’ if you will.”

There’s a kind of class double-think going on here. On the one hand, upper-middle-class Americans believe they are operating in a meritocracy (a belief that allows them to feel entitled to their winnings); on the other hand, they constantly engage in antimeritocratic behavior in order to give their own children a leg up. To the extent that there is any ethical deliberation, it usually results in a justification along the lines of “Well, maybe it’s wrong, but everyone’s doing it.”

(Continue Reading)

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television wlw appreciation week 2017: day three

your first wlw ship - quinn/rachel (glee)

“I’m not going to sit around and watch you ruin your life by marrying Finn Hudson.”

“The American Dream… induces a form of hyper individualism […] the idea that anybody of little means, with hard work and determination, can lift themselves to the highest rungs of bourgeoisie society (the richest of the rich). By focusing on individual stories of capitalist success, the Bill Gates and Sam Waltons of the world, the vast poverty and suffering required for the emergence of massive fortunes is left out of the picture. One can point to Gates and believe their own ascendance is possible without understanding its possibility is predicated on the systematic exploitation of tens of thousands of workers in mines and factories across the globe. And more importantly, focus on the few success stories of the super-rich invisibilizes the structure which keeps wealth within their hands at the direct expense of the poor and makes it beyond examination or reproach.”

– Overcoming the American Dream

After spending hours several times rambling over robots, I figured I’d finally draw this. I included @doodledrawsthings oc Vito, since he’s so cute. Literally if I character in a thing is a robot, there’s a billion percent chance I love them and a 99 percent chance they’re my favorite character.

total chris pine moments in wonder woman
  • stealing something from evil dudes and then just booking it
  • cooly dropping a bomb onto a building while flying away
  • ..then proceeding to crash said plane and drown
  • needing to be saved by others
  • ACCIDENTALLY bringing his problems into other people’s lives
  • just the fact that tons of dudes want to kill him (like same)
  • his face when the lasso of truth
  • claiming to be an expert in stealth and stuff yeah right
  • giggling as he swishes his feet around in the hot tub
  • casually talking about his dad’s watch while nude
  • seriously he was standing there for like 8 minutes put somE CLOTHES ON (he was just pretending to be embarrassed okay he wanted to show off)
  • being confused 99% percent of the time
  • sighing whenever diana does anything
  • giving others fashion advice
  • but also the impatient “it’s been 2hrs can we get outta here??” husband
  • not wanting diana to steal his spotlight
  • that dramatic ‘ow that hurt’ hand shaking post epic punch
  • remus lupin: don’t do the thing!! chris: i’m sorry did you say dO IT?
  • but is a total hypocrite cause he continues to nag diana NOT TO DO THE THING!
  • “you’re breaking up, i can’t hear you sorry BYE!”
  • makes a big fuss about not taking the drink but then ends up taking it anyway
  • ripping off jacket to reveal a whole new outfit and excitedly jumping into a stolen car
  • the pipe and the german accent (was that even acting cause all i saw was chris)
  • wooing all the ladies
  • …by buying them ice cream and doing stupid impressions
  • dramatic goodbye but his gf can’t even here him
  • grinning as he blows himself up
  • just a bunch of questionable life choices okay?

Oceans are vital to wildlife and our planet. Containing 99 percent of the living space on earth, oceans are vast habitats for an impressive array of life. To celebrate World Ocean Day, we’re sharing this remarkable picture of bioluminescent plankton near Haystack Rock at Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge. From moments like this to surfing, sailing, fishing and diving, oceans are essential to our lives, economy and natural understanding. Photo courtesy of Jeff Berkes.