95 percent

anonymous asked:

Jay Merrick headcanon; Jessica//S/o is literally 95 percent if his impulse control, without them he has possibly killed multiple people in order to find them or some shit like that

Jay can’t stand to be without you. He needs you to guide him and calm him. You’re his control, what grounds him. Whatever you say goes. You say jump? He says how high and goes even higher than that.

He could be mere seconds from killing a man and all you have to do is ask him to stop, and he’ll act as if he’s done nothing wrong.

You’re sobbing? Over a movie? He’ll threaten the director if that’s what you want. He’ll send them severed heads if it’ll stop those tears in your pretty eyes.

And if someone where to /Hurt/ you? Leave a mark? Your word may calm him but as much as it guilts him to lie to you and disobey, that person is maimed and even killed if it’s bad enough.

Jay is under your thumb and he likes it that way. You’re his God/Goddess after all.

slate.com
The FBI Faked an Entire Field of Forensic Science
For more stories like this, like Slate on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. The Washington Post published a story so horrifying this weekend that it would

“‘Of 28 examiners with the FBI Laboratory’s microscopic hair comparison unit, 26 overstated forensic matches in ways that favored prosecutors in more than 95 percent of the 268 trials reviewed so far.’ The shameful, horrifying errors were uncovered in a massive, three-year review by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the Innocence Project. Following revelations published in recent years, the two groups are helping the government with the country’s largest ever post-conviction review of questioned forensic evidence.

Chillingly, as the Post continues, ‘the cases include those of 32 defendants sentenced to death.’ Of these defendants, 14 have already been executed or died in prison.”

Let this sink in for a minute.

“These are the times that try men’s souls.”

President Trump has earned an express pass to the nether world, according to “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda.

The playwright and songwriter said Trump, facing intense criticism for the federal response to Hurricane Maria, is “going straight to hell” after spending Saturday tweeting nearly hourly about media coverage of recovery efforts and accusing Puerto Rican officials of wanting “everything to be done for them.”

Miranda made the proclamation after the President, from the confines of his New Jersey golf resort, shared a snarky personal attack against the mayor of San Juan, accusing her of playing politics after a heartfelt plea for help.

At least 16 people have died in the U.S. territory in the harrowing 10 days since the Category 4 storm roared ashore.

Council Speaker Mark-Viverito says despair hitting Puerto Rico
Residents, left with no electricity, fuel, food and water, have been frustrated by the pace of relief efforts and critics have blamed Trump for the slow federal response.

“I’m a ticking time bomb on the verge of exploding,” said Adeline Vazquez, 53, who needs a ventilator for respiratory problems and whose building in the western city of Mayaguez does not have enough fuel to run a generator 24 hours a day.

More than half of the 3.4 million people who live on the island have no access to drinking water, and 95 percent remain without power, officials said. Many roads remain impassable, making it difficult to get food, water and fuel around the island.

Moved On

(Gif credit: allywantstofly)

Summary: After being rejected by her childhood crush, Steve Harrington, the reader looks for comfort in Billy Hargrove. 

It had been two months since Nancy and Steve broke up. And only a month since he stopped coming over to my house a couple times a week sobbing about her. Nancy… it was a shitty breakup. She led him on, told him she loved him, and then cheated on him. He was busted up, he was arranging his future around staying with her.

I always had feelings for Steve. The two of us grew up together, he was the neighbor across the street from me. He was my first kiss… when we were six years old. He lost his favorite tonka truck and when I found it for him, he planted a big ol’ kiss right on my lips.

We were attached at the hip throughout middle school, always doing our homework together, going to each other’s games and recitals. He and Nancy broke up, and I determined it was time to make my move.

Keep reading

Solar System: 10 Things to Know This Week

The Living Planet Edition

Whether it’s crops, forests or phytoplankton blooms in the ocean, our scientists are tracking life on Earth. Just as satellites help researchers study the atmosphere, rainfall and other physical characteristics of the planet, the ever-improving view from above allows them to study Earth’s interconnected life.

1. Life on Earth, From Space

While we (NASA) began monitoring life on land in the 1970s with the Landsat satellites, this fall marks 20 years since we’ve continuously observed all the plant life at the surface of both the land and ocean. The above animation captures the entirety of two decades of observations.

2. Watching the World Breathe

With the right tools, we can see Earth breathe. With early weather satellite data in the 1970s and ‘80s, NASA Goddard scientist Compton Tucker was able to see plants’ greening and die-back from space. He developed a way of comparing satellite data in two wavelengths.

When healthy plants are stocked with chlorophyll and ready to photosynthesize to make food (and absorb carbon dioxide), leaves absorb red light but reflect infrared light back into space. By comparing the ratio of red to infrared light, Tucker and his colleagues could quantify vegetation covering the land.

Expanding the study to the rest of the globe, the scientists could track rainy and dry seasons in Africa, see the springtime blooms in North America, and wildfires scorching forests worldwide.

3. Like Breathing? Thank Earth’s Ocean

But land is only part of the story. The ocean is home to 95 percent of Earth’s living space, covering 70 percent of the planet and stretching miles deep. At the base of the ocean’s food web is phytoplankton - tiny plants that also undergo photosynthesis to turn nutrients and carbon dioxide into sugar and oxygen. Phytoplankton not only feed the rest of ocean life, they absorb carbon dioxide - and produce about half the oxygen we breathe.

In the Arctic Ocean, an explosion of phytoplankton indicates change. As seasonal sea ice melts, warming waters and more sunlight will trigger a sudden, massive phytoplankton bloom that feeds birds, sea lions and newly-hatched fish. But with warming atmospheric temperatures, that bloom is now happening several weeks earlier - before the animals are in place to take advantage of it.

4. Keeping an Eye on Crops

The “greenness” measurement that scientists use to measure forests and grasslands can also be used to monitor the health of agricultural fields. By the 1980s, food security analysts were approaching NASA to see how satellite images could help with the Famine Early Warning System to identify regions at risk - a partnership that continues today.

With rainfall estimates, vegetation measurements, as well as the recent addition of soil moisture information, our scientists can help organizations like USAID direct emergency help.

The view from space can also help improve agricultural practices. A winery in California, for example, uses individual pixels of Landsat data to determine when to irrigate and how much water to use.

5. Coming Soon to the International Space Station

A laser-based instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique 3-D view of Earth’s forests. The instrument, called GEDI, will be the first to systematically probe the depths of the forests from space.

Another ISS instrument in development, ECOSTRESS, will study how effectively plants use water. That knowledge provided on a global scale from space will tell us “which plants are going to live or die in a future world of greater droughts,” said Josh Fisher, a research scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and science lead for ECOSTRESS.

6. Seeing Life, From the Microscopic to Multicellular

Scientists have used our vantage from space to study changes in animal habitats, track disease outbreaks, monitor forests and even help discover a new species. Bacteria, plants, land animals, sea creatures and birds reveal a changing world.

Our Black Marble image provides a unique view of human activity. Looking at trends in our lights at night, scientists can study how cities develop over time, how lighting and activity changes during certain seasons and holidays, and even aid emergency responders during power outages caused by natural disasters.

7. Earth as Analog and Proving Ground

Just as our Mars rovers were tested in Earth’s deserts, the search for life on ocean moons in our solar system is being refined by experiments here. JPL research scientist Morgan Cable looks for life on the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. She cites satellite observations of Arctic and Antarctic ice fields that are informing the planning for a future mission to Europa, an icy moon of Jupiter.

The Earth observations help researchers find ways to date the origin of jumbled, chaotic ice. “When we visit Europa, we want to go to very young places, where material from that ocean is being expressed on the surface,” she explained. “Anywhere like that, the chances of finding biomarkers goes up - if they’re there.”

8. Only One Living Planet

Today, we know of only one living planet: our own. The knowledge and tools NASA developed to study life here are among our greatest assets as we begin the search for life beyond Earth.

There are two main questions: With so many places to look, how can we home in on the places most likely to harbor life? What are the unmistakable signs of life - even if it comes in a form we don’t fully understand? In this early phase of the search, “We have to go with the only kind of life we know,” said Tony del Genio, co-lead of a new NASA interdisciplinary initiative to search for life on other worlds.

So, the focus is on liquid water. Even bacteria around deep-sea vents that don’t need sunlight to live need water. That one necessity rules out many planets that are too close or too far from their stars for water to exist, or too far from us to tell. Our Galileo and Cassini missions revealed that some moons of Jupiter and Saturn are not the dead rocks astronomers had assumed, but appear to have some conditions needed for life beneath icy surfaces.

9. Looking for Life Beyond Our Solar System

In the exoplanet (planets outside our solar system that orbit another star) world, it’s possible to calculate the range of distances for any star where orbiting planets could have liquid water. This is called the star’s habitable zone. Astronomers have already located some habitable-zone planets, and research scientist Andrew Rushby of NASA Ames Research Center is researching ways to refine the search. “An alien would spot three planets in our solar system in the habitable zone [Earth, Mars and Venus],” Rushby said, “but we know that 67 percent of those planets are not inhabited.”

He recently developed a model of Earth’s carbon cycle and combined it with other tools to study which planets in habitable zones would be the best targets to look for life, considering probable tectonic activity and water cycles. He found that larger planets are more likely than smaller ones to have surface temperatures conducive to liquid water. Other exoplanet researchers are looking for rocky worlds, and biosignatures, the chemical signs of life.

10. You Can Learn a Lot from a Dot

When humans start collecting direct images of exoplanets, even the closest ones will appear as only a handful of pixels in the detector - something like the famous “blue dot” image of Earth from Saturn. What can we learn about life on these planets from a single dot?

Stephen Kane of the University of California, Riverside, has come up with a way to answer that question by using our EPIC camera on NOAA’s DSCOVR satellite. “I’m taking these glorious pictures and collapsing them down to a single pixel or handful of pixels,” Kane explained. He runs the light through a noise filter that attempts to simulate the interference expected from an exoplanet mission. By observing how the brightness of Earth changes when mostly land is in view compared with mostly water, Kane reverse-engineers Earth’s rotation rate - something that has yet to be measured directly for exoplanets.

The most universal, most profound question about any unknown world is whether it harbors life. The quest to find life beyond Earth is just beginning, but it will be informed by the study of our own living planet.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

How Sony deals with fandoms

I’ve been to an international in-house PR summit hosted by one of my clients this week and nearly fell off my chair when one of the guest speakers was a VERY important person from Sony Music Entertainment. Let’s call him John. I won’t disclose his function and real name because I don’t want to reveal where I was, but based on his title he definitely knows what he‘s saying and has a lot of industry experience.

His speech was mainly  about how to engage with a variety of different target audiences. Of bloody course one of the first slides he showed was a picture of 1D engaging with fans which was supposed to drive the point home that there are some audiences who are more passionate about a brand than others.He mentioned then that he’s worked with 1D on their albums which drove me into a bit of a freeze.

Because I’m embarrassing, I recorded parts of his speech on my phone and wrote the most important things down to share some interesting insights he gave about how Sony manages their artists’ target audiences, crafts their artists’ social media actions and deals with the fact that at the end of the day they always need to get people to buy music.

 

HOW DOES SONY UNDERSTAND AND MONITOR AUDIENCES (like fandoms for instance)?

According to John, they have their very own data-driven digital tool that helps them identify and manage different target groups for an artist (it’s not perfected yet but has been rolled out a lot of countries, I think he said 50?) and see where there might be connections to other artists, who the influencers are, what the specific target groups are or will be interested in and to identify collaboration opportunities.

Target groups are being split into four categories: Fanatics, enthusiasts, casuals, indifferents. These segments are being broken down into even smaller groups defined by age, genre preference, gender and country. They found that the older you get, the less likely you’ll be a fanatic or enthusiast.

How does Sony find this stuff out? Well, they survey polled music audiences of every age in a way that covers either nationally representatives or represent one of the major top tier cities. People shared their music preferences, consumption habits, lifestyle, media habits etc. Sony gathered all that information, analysed the insights and created their own audience understanding tool.

According to John, that way everyone at Sony has access to an interactive map of the world of Sony that looks into segmentations and audiences for every artist while being searchable in a number of different ways. The tool is pulling from real data, but they are also adding to that „with things like analytics of platforms like Spotify where we are able to gather lots of informations about user behaviours and reference that against things that we do“.

 

HOW SONY STRATEGICALLY SHAPES PR STORIES

John gave the example of Snoop Doggy Dog who had launched a new album (song? Idk) around that time: „There was a week-long debate in parliament around the legalization of Marihuana, so we just jumped on this conversation and did lots of social marketing around Snoop with his rolling papers and his spliffs… so maybe that’s bad taste, I’ll allow you to judge that for yourselves. The point is though that you are also marketing into a wider cultural context. [You need] an understanding how that works and where you can have a conversation that is seamless and not fake, genuineness is quite important.

“The way you can get people to connect is: You’ve got a lot of stuff that you want to say. Start under the assumption that people actually don’t give a shit about 95 percent of it. And then see which are the bits that might overlap. This is where the understanding of the audience really comes into its own. It forces us to think before we jump to execution. The quest for relevance is vitally important.”

Why are people to connect with a brand/band though? John thinks this is one of the most underused questions when planning an approach. Why is it that they do specific things? He gave an example: „We would normally take a record to radio because we always believe that radio is the thing that breaks the record. But if my core audience, my phase one audience – the people that are gonna give that band its first lift – are on Spotify, what am I doing on radio??“


ENGAGEMENT AROUND ARTIST IS KEY

„The thing is that you don’t start with a conversation around a product. The consumption of the product is the end point of a journey where you built an engagement and a fan. So again, for us that means that when we sit down and do our plan around our next Robbie Williams album, we start with „How are we gonna maximize the engagement around Robbie Williams“? because that will then sell us albums. Not „Okay, we’ll be releasing in a week in November, eight weeks out we need to be here, here and here“. So we’re not doing product launches anymore unless [it is suitable for the target demographic]. We have to built a tension and an engagement around an artist.“

 

ABOUT THEIR ARTISTS‘ SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS

„We run most of our artists social media channels or at least their official  pages, so we are involved in all of those conversations.“


Shocking, I know.

Based on the situation we face in this fandom,with this band, feel free to draw your own conclusions about what this information means.

HERE ARE MY KEY TAKEAWAYS:

1.       It’s not news at all, but the existence of their own audience understandig tool confirms it: the 1D fandom is being monitored, segmented and analyzed. Sony’s strategies are tightly tied to that fact. Collaborations or artist interactions such as Louis/James Arthur or One Direction/ Little Mix are most likely the result of a data-driven analysis of whose fan groups are similar and whose are likely to be open towards that particular other artist too.

2.       Again no news, but the example of Snoop Doggy Dog shows that there are strategies behind even the most random photos. Often placements of specific pictures or stories serve a wider purpose. Hello pap walks, hello b**ygate, hello Louis Twitter, hello Liam visibly being linked to L.A.‘s cool singer/songwriter crowd before his first album drop.  

3.       The decision to not promote Louis‘ song could very well have been a logical outcome of the team asking themselves the question „Why?“: Why should we promote his song with huge effort when we KNOW his own fans are going to do it passionately, especially if they think  we don’t give a shit? Why not playing that game in order to make them promo it the hardest way they can?“ Why indeed??

4.       One Direction is a huge deal for Sony. John was talking about a lot of bands during his speech but whenever he was talking about major acts, he always listed One Direction amongst them (along with gems like Beyonce, David Bowie, Adele). He name-dropped them at least 5 -6 times in a 60 minute speech. He really didn’t have to because the audience was in no way whatsoever a target audience. So yes, they clearly have been and are a very huge deal for them.

5.       The part about social media? Well :))))))

Shit my wife has said to the cat, part 5

- I was going to say “a plight upon your house,” Miss Kitty, but then I realized I am your house.

- I swear Miss Kitty you get five feet within my sphere you little shit fuck, guardian spirits will come and rip you apart.

- OH MY GOD. Fire. Brimstone! That’s what’s coming to sinners like you, you’re so fucking cute, fuck! I’m LASHING OUT.

- There’s my fat boy!!!! HOLD UP! We’ve got a situation here. (goes to get treats)

- I’m not going to pet you very long because you’re a sociopath. You lure them in with charm and then you slaughter them with nails. Sharp nails.

- What’s this one? Chicken Dinner in gravy! And the ‘in gravy’ is italicized so you know it’s gourmet, you little shit!

- No, no. You’re going to sit your ass down on this floor and we are going to play with this motherfucking bell ball, you bastard.

- Miss Kitty, are you aware that you are a cat? (to me) She’s absorbing the news. (thoughtful pause). There, you’re coming to grips with it now, aren’t you, Miss Kitty?

- You were made by a great, dark, wizard dollmaker, back in Mother Russia. And he called you… “Russian Blue.” And one day, you may find that your clockwork heart– oh no…. (looks at me) she’s typing this.

- You gotta do something about your face, buddy. It’s like… 95 percent on-party.

- You’re on your own now, you barbarian.

- Don’t look at me with that cute face! Don’t flash it around like a VIP ticket to my side of the bed!

- WHY do you always hold your paws as if you’re holding an opera fan? “Oh dear! I’ve got the vapors!” (sees me typing). No, they can’t see his paws. They don’t know he’s the queen of the opera, singing his song to the rafters. He does not know that the audience has long since left him…

- LIE BACK DOWN I MADE YOU AN OPERA FAN.

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4

10

Star Wars: The Clone Wars Meme || Quotes (1/8)

“Hurry it up Dooku.”

“You should be more patient Master. After all the Count is an elderly gentlemen and doesn’t move like he used to.”

“I suppose you’re right.”

“I would kill you both right now if I did not have to drag your bodies.”

Solar System: Things to Know This Week

From images to virtual reality and interactive simulations, NASA offers plenty of ways to explore our solar system – and beyond – in 3-D.

1. Step One: Get the Glasses

Many of the images and interactive features require special glasses with red and blue lenses.

2. Breaking News (Virtual Reality Edition)

Big news from 40 light-years away (235 trillion miles). Our Spitzer Space Telescope revealed the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star. Three of these planets are firmly located in the habitable zone, all of them have the potential for water on their surfaces.

No glasses required.

This image was created by combining two images from STEREO B (Feb. 24, 2008) taken about 12 hours apart, during which the sun’s rotation provides sufficient perspective to create a nice 3-D effect.

3. Free-Range 3-D Exploration

Our Eyes on the Solar System app allows free exploration of Earth, our Solar System and thousands of worlds discovered orbiting distant stars. And, you also can explore it all in 3-D!

Under visual controls just check 3-D, pop on your glasses and explore.

4. Your Star in 3-D

The STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory) mission studied the sun in 3-D with twin satellites.

5. National Parks in 3-D

The Earth-orbiting Terra satellite’s Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument provides 3-D views while orbiting Earth, including some great shots of our National Parks.

6. Get in the Pilot’s Seat

Take a look inside the cockpit of our high altitude ER-2 aircraft as it descends for landing at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. This month, scientists used used the aircraft to collect data on coral reef health and volcanic emissions and eruptions. Flying at 65,000 feet, above 95 percent of Earth’s atmosphere, the ER-2 has a unique ability to replicate the data a future satellite could collect. Data from this mission will help in developing a planned NASA satellite mission to study natural hazards and ecosystems called Hyperspectral Infrared Imager, or HyspIRI.

7. Moon Views

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter creates 3-D images from orbit by taking an image of the moon from one angle on one orbit and a different angle on a separate orbit.

This stereo scene looking back at where Curiosity crossed a dune at “Dingo Gap” combines several exposures taken by the Navigation Camera (Navcam) high on the rover’s mast.

8. Martian 3D

Our Mars fleet of rovers and orbiters captures the Red Planet from all angles - often in 3-D.

9. Saturn in 3-D

The Cassini spacecraft’s mission to Saturn is well-known for its stunning images of the planet and its complex system of rings and moons. Now you can see some of them in 3-D.

10. Want More? Do It Yourself!

Put a new dimension to your vacation photos. Our Mars team created this handy how-to guide to making your own eye-popping 3-D images.

BONUS: Printer-Friendly

Why stop with images? The Ames Research Center hosts a vast collection of 3-D printable models ranging from the moon craters to spacecraft.

Discover more lists of 10 things to know about our solar system HERE.

Follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

[…] According to Carrie Bradshaw, when you live in New York, you’re always looking for a job, a significant other or an apartment — the three elusive keys to success and happiness. Now that list has grown to include tickets to “Hamilton.”


Yes, “Hamilton,” the groundbreaking musical that’s sold out months in advance. When a single ticket can cost over $1,000, revealing just how much money you spent on the show has become a status symbol in cocktail-party conversation.


I have seen “Hamilton.” I have seen it three times, in fact, thanks to my job as a journalist, which frequently involves writing about theater. And when I’m dating, somehow that one aspect of my existence is all anyone wants to talk about.


I can see why, if people read my work, they might think I somehow have easy access to the show. I’ve interviewed most of the original cast, including the women who played the Schuyler sisters and Chris Jackson, who played George Washington. I wrote about Javier Muñoz’s triumph over cancer and, in what is by far the most unexpected moment of my career, I have beat-boxed while the show’s creator, Miranda, free-styled.


When New Yorkers meet someone for the first time, they usually ask “What do you do?” or “Where do you live?” When meeting potential gentlemen callers, I’ve come to dread answering that question, because about 95 percent of the time, the conversation immediately turns to “Hamilton.” The exchange usually goes something like this:


Him: What do you do?
Me: I’m a journalist.
Him: What do you write about?
Me: Culture and politics. I focus on feminism and health care.
Him: What kind of culture?
Me: I write a lot about theater. And film and TV as well.
Him: Have you seen “Hamilton”?
Me: Yes …
Him (leaning in, speaking quietly): Can you get me tickets? Or do you know how to get them?


[…]


I would love to meet a man who enjoys seeing theater and would appreciate all of the dates we’d go on together — not just “Hamilton.” One of the musical’s most famous lyrics states: “I am not throwing away my shot.” I wish these men would realize that when they ask if I can get them tickets, they have already thrown away theirs.

Concert Review: Harry Styles’ New Direction Receives Warm L.A. Welcome at the Greek

Styles is quickly finding his footing, going from boy-band ensemble player to rock star in a pop world, even if he waited well into the set to get his full Jagger on.

With the classic-rock-steeped solo debut he released three months ago, Harry Styles claimed rights to making the dad-rock album of the year. At least in theory, anyway. That potential audience of older dudes who share his newly revealed affection for 1970s Americana and ‘90s Brit-rock may still not have gotten the memo that they’d probably like his self-titled album even better than One Direction fans. They’re certainly not the types to have signed up in advance for Ticketmaster’s “Verified Fan” program so they could sell out his fall tour within seconds.

And so it came to be that Styles performed at L.A.’s Greek Theatre Wednesday night for an audience that was (by conservative estimates) 97 percent female, 95 percent 17-to-25, and 120 percent ear-piercingly shrieky. Narrowcasting doesn’t get any louder, so he can probably live with putting off the demographic expansion just a little longer.

The Greek is the second of 13 “intimate” venues he’s playing at this month and next — Radio City Music Hall being a similarly cozy stopover Sept. 28 — before ramping up to arenas like the Forum and Madison Square Garden next summer. (Also already all sold out months ago; sorry, again, we’re sure, late-blooming dude fans.) He already did a gig some time ago at the Troubadour, so he’s smart enough to know that it looks better to look like you’re working your way up, even if your natural habitat before going solo was stadiums, and could well be again before a world tour finds its final leg.

The more modest touring start may not all be for appearance’s sake, though. Styles may also know that reinventing his performing style as a lone frontman is something that won’t be completely mastered in a gig or two. At the Greek, you could sense Styles still sussing out exactly how to make the transition from boy-band ensemble player to rock star — not that, being the most debonair twentysomething in the western hemisphere, he’s ever going to let you see him sweat it.

He’s well on his way to having it down. There’s a lot of savvy to the way Styles has structured his relatively brisk 80-minute set. As the show began with some of the new album’s least ostentatious numbers, like “Ever Since New York” and the acoustically inclined “Two Ghosts,” Styles was nearly board-stiff as a frontman. You might have thought: Is this his rockist way of doing atonement for all those years of two-dimensional 1D video frolic? Even a revival of One Direction’s “Stockholm Syndrome” early in the set had him playing it reserved.

But when the glam-rockiness of “Only Angel” kicked in just shy of the halfway point, Styles traded in the Tim Buckley part of his neo-retro persona to start getting his Jagger on a little more, even giving the girls a frisky wag of the tongue. In a show that’s still this short, it was smart to start with a slow folkie burn and work up to a cocksure crescendo.

“Thank you for coming to see me when I’ve only got 10 songs,” he told the crowd late in the show, perhaps to diminish expectations that it would end with an epic reprise of One Direction’s greatest hits. He did expand the set list to 14 by throwing in not just “Stockholm Syndrome” but 1D’s “What Makes You Beautiful,” made far less cloying than its original smash incarnation by its transformation into a legitimate guitar-rocker. A revival of the song he co-wrote for Ariana Grande a few years back, “Just a Little Bit of Your Heart,” also lent the show some familiarity. Although Styles is known to have rehearsed a lot of covers, the only one he’s busting out at present is an encore of Fleetwood Mac’s “The Chain.” (Mick Fleetwood was in attendance, going unrecognized at length in the concession area as hundreds of young women passed by on their way to the epic merch line.)

Styles tends toward a poker face, but that does lend extra volubility to the mere breakout of an unexpected grin, as when he reacted with good humor to a microphone repeatedly going floppy during the Ariana Grande number. Even in the more grandstanding, hard-rocking numbers late in the show, there’s still a slight sense of reserve in his physicality, at times. But holding back a little may be a good instinct to have when you’re so iconic that the slightest twitch or unexpected vocal trill gets the kind of roar that’s usually only afforded a football touchdown. He’s still gaging exactly how to work the audience, in this new mode, and you’d be silly to bet against him getting it wrong.

There were few actual dads in the audience, since Styles’ One Direction fan base has aged up to the point where not many of them need chaperoning. But the ones who did get pressed into service may have had some of the most satisfied smiles of all: Getting to fulfill a teenager’s wishes and personally relive the Britpop glory years of Bowie through Blur definitely counts as killing two birds with one stone.

Special props are also due to whoever designed Styles’ very stylin’ turquoise flower-print suit, which looked like it might have refashioned from the greatest 1970s couch ever made. He’s a man who knows how to bring revivalist sexy back in all sorts of ways.

Senate Update from Washington

I woke up to an email from Senator Maria Cantwell– who i’d emailed/faxed etc through Resistbot. 
I can’t take a screenshot bc of format of my email but i can copy/paste:

Dear Ms. P,

Thank you for contacting me regarding net neutrality. I appreciate hearing from you on this important issue. 

As you know, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai announced that he is starting proceedings to repeal the FCC’s net neutrality regulations. I strongly oppose the Chairman’s proposal to repeal these rules. I have consistently urged the FCC to use the strongest possible regulatory authority that will lead to robust and durable rules to prevent blocking, throttling, fast lanes, and safeguard transparency for consumers. 

A two-tiered Internet is unacceptable. Americans do not pay different rates for slow or fast telephone service and should not have to for the Internet, either. The Internet is a bedrock component of the 21st Century innovation economy and we must continue to fight hard for a level playing field. Americans understand this. When the FCC first sought comments on its net neutrality rules, four million Americans registered their views with the FCC, the highest number on any issue in FCC history. These comments deliver one message overwhelmingly—nearly 95 percent are in favor of strong net neutrality protections. 

As a senior member of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, I have consistently fought for strong net neutrality rules and will continue to push the FCC to keep rules protecting equal access to the Internet. These regulations enable commerce, idea sharing, and communication on a scale that could not have been imagined even a few decades ago. The Internet is one of the greatest economic and innovative engines in human history. 

An open Internet that provides equal access to all of us is the foundation of the leading-edge and entrepreneurial activity which has been the driver of our economic growth.  I strongly support net neutrality principles that protect consumers, innovators and promote economic growth. Consumers need access to open Internet. We cannot allow the FCC to imperil our innovation economy ingenuity and stifle our economic growth.

Thank you again for contacting me to share your thoughts on this matter. Please do not hesitate to contact me in the future if I can be of further assistance.

Sincerely,
Maria Cantwell
United States Senator

We are getting their attention, one, and two it’s a lot more reassuring that at least one of my senators is on the same page.

The dent of racism is not hard to detect in West Virginia. In the 2008 Democratic primary there, 95 percent of the voters were white. Twenty percent of those—one in five—openly admitted that race was influencing their vote, and more than 80 percent voted for Hillary Clinton over Barack Obama. Four years later, the incumbent Obama lost the primary in 10 counties to Keith Judd, a white felon incarcerated in a federal prison; Judd racked up more than 40 percent of the Democratic-primary vote in the state. A simple thought experiment: Can one imagine a black felon in a federal prison running in a primary against an incumbent white president doing so well?
—  Ta-Nehisi Coates, on race and Trump’s election
“In a context in which 95 percent of adoptees are girls, it is important to address questions of how racialized desire might intersect with the construction of Asian female bodies. Cheung (2000), for example, argues that in American cultural history Asian women have been endowed with an “excess” of womanhood (alongside the full manhood denied Asian men). And in China/U.S. adoption, mothers Deena Houston and Jackie Kovich were not alone in conjuring the image of beautiful, enthralling Chinese girls. Adoption agencies consistently use photos of cute, dolled-up Asian girls in their advertising; some use phrases such as “From China with Love” to attract would-be parents. Some of those prospective parents said they had become enchanted with their friends’ or neighbors’ Chinese girls. Margaret Jennings said she saw a photo of a Chinese adopted girl in the paper and “knew I wanted to adopt from China right then.” Some expressed embarrassment at what they suspected hinted at “racist love”— embrace of the “acceptable model” of the racial minority (Chan 1972, quoted in Cheung 2000: 309). Just days after she had met her daughter, Barbara and I were discussing what seemed among some new adoptive mothers an obsession with dolling up their daughters, when Barbara stopped to say in a low tone, “I hate to ask this, but are all the children beautiful? It seems like they’re all beautiful.”
—  Sara Dorow, “Why China?: Identifying Histories of Transnational Adoption,” Asian American Studies Now (2010)  
The Virus

Got a smack of inspiration and knocked this one out in a couple of hours! Starring a new boy, V1RuS! Enjoy!

Heads up, this one is LONG.


You giggle excitedly as you plug the jump drive into your computer; you’d finally managed to get your hands on a copy of an old game you’d been trying to find for ages. You quickly pull up the installer and sit back, watching as the little progress bar did its thing across the screen. You briefly think back to something your friend had said about not being connected to the internet while installing it, but you shook your head; it was an online game, right? Shouldn’t it be connected when it’s installed for patches and such?

You gleefully hop when the progress bar nears the end, and watch it as the percentages go up: 95 percent, 96 percent, 97 percent….

Abruptly the screen flashes black, startling you. You get the briefest of impressions that the screen had been looking out at you before the display returns to normal.

100 percent.

You shake your head and put the weird blip out of your mind; it was time to start playing!

Keep reading

Actress Gabourey Sidibe On Anxiety, Phone Sex And Life After ‘Precious’

Sidibe’s break-out role was in Precious, Lee Daniels’ 2009 film about a girl who is sexually abused by her father and physically abused by her mother. She speaks with Terry Gross about landing the title role despite the fact she didn’t have acting experience, overcoming anxiety and depression as a kid, and what it was like to work for a phone sex hotline:

“It was good practice for this interview right now! … You think that phone sex is about getting the caller off, but it’s about keeping the caller on. It’s about leading with your personality and making sure that they’re still listening and they’re still interested in you, because you cannot make money when they hang up. … They pay by the minute, and I get paid by the minute. …

[The company wouldn’t] hire you if you had no ability to make your voice white, because that’s who the men on the phone wanted to talk to. … The company was [run] by 95 percent plus-size black women. It’s so interesting that … we were all plus size and these men would not normally be into us, and if they were it’s a fetish or whatever. …

So it’s very strange to go from undesirable, into the office, you clock in, and [they say,] “I love you so much. I’ll call you every day” … but they think I’m white. … You think you’re talking to Megan Fox, but you’re talking to Precious. Look how dope and fierce and amazing and smart and genius we are to fool you into thinking that we’re the opposite.”

  • Sam: How can you defend a country where five percent of the people control 95 percent of the wealth?
  • Tucker: I'm defending a country where people can think, and act, and worship any way they want!
  • Sam: Can not.
  • Tucker: Can too.
  • Sam: Can not!
  • Tucker: Can too!
  • Lancer: Please, please, kids, stop fighting. Maybe Mr. Foley's right about America being the land of opportunity, and maybe Miss Manson's got a point about the machinery of capitalism being oiled with the blood of the workers.