8th Century

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PLACES IN THE ANCIENT WORLD: Copan (Honduras) 

Copán (in modern Honduras) is located on the floodplain of the river of the same name. It was the most southerly of the Classic Maya centres and, at an altitude of 600 metres, the highest. Copán reached the height of its power in the 8th century CE when it boasted 20,000 inhabitants. 

An artificial platform, built to a height of over 30 metres, forms a main 12 acre acropolis with lesser platforms spreading out to form an imposing mass of precincts of monumental courts and pyramids.

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Info by Mark Cartwright on Ancient History Encyclopedia 

The Goddess Ganga (the Ganges River)
Right door jamb (pedya)

Artist/maker unknown, Indian

Geography:
Made in Madhya Pradesh, India, Asia
Possibly made in Madhya Pradesh, Mandasor Region, India, Asia
Date:
Mid- 8th to mid- 9th century
Medium:
Sandstone

Philadelphia Museum of Art

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“Skellig Michael (Irish: Sceilig Mhichíl), or Great Skellig (Irish: Sceilig Mhór), is an island (the larger of the two Skellig Islands) in the Atlantic Ocean, 11.6 km west of the Iveragh Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland. A Christian monastery was founded on the island at some point between the 6th and 8th century, and was continuously occupied until its abandonment in the late 12th century. The remains of the monastery, along with most of the island itself, became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996.

Skellig Michael was uninhabited prior to the foundation of its monastery. Folklore holds that Ir, son of Míl Espáine, was buried on the island, and a text from the 8th or 9th century states that Duagh, King of West Munster, fled to “Scellecc” after a feud with the Kings of Cashel, although it is not known whether these events actually took place.

The monastic site on the island is located on a terraced shelf 600 feet above sea-level, and developed between the sixth and eighth century. It contains six beehive cells, two oratories as well as a number of stone crosses and slabs. It also contains a later medieval church. The cells and oratories are all of dry-built corbel construction. A carefully designed system for collecting and purifying water in cisterns was developed. It has been estimated that no more than twelve monks and an abbot lived here at any one time. A hermitage is located on the south peak.”

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Images of the Oseberg Ship
The Oseberg ship (Norwegian: Osebergskipet) is a well-preserved Viking ship discovered in a large burial mound at the Oseberg farm near Tønsberg in Vestfold county, Norway. The Oseberg burial mound (Norwegian: Oseberghaugen ved Slagen from the Old Norse word haugr meaning mound or barrow) contained numerous grave goods and two female human skeletons. The ship’s interment into its burial mound dates from 834 AD, but parts of the ship date from around 800, and the ship itself is thought to be older. It was excavated by Norwegian archaeologist Haakon Shetelig and Swedish archaeologist Gabriel Gustafson in 1904-1905. This ship is widely celebrated and has been called one of the finest finds to have survived the Viking Age. The ship and some of its contents are displayed at the Viking Ship Museum, in Bygdøy.

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The Coppergate Helmet (also known as York Helmet) is an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon helmet found in York. It is remarkably well preserved and is one of only four Anglo-Saxon helmets discovered to date. The partial remains of a fifth helmet were found in the Staffordshire Hoard.

Like many other helmets of Germanic Western and Northern Europe in the Early Middle Ages the construction of Coppergate helmet is derivative of Late Roman helmet types. 

Link

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Anglo-Saxon Finger Ring, 7thC - 8thC AD. Gold finger-ring; broad, flat hoop expanding to large oval bezel; covered with bands of twisted wire, simulating plaiting and diverging at the shoulders to enclose a circular design in pearled wire and pellets. Principal motive may be a quatrefoil, pellets in centre and interspaces forming a cross pattee. | ↳THE BRITISH MUSEUM

An old warrior

You are looking at a warrior with a raised weapon in an 8th-century law manuscript. The book was made in 793 in Lyons, France, by someone who called himself Wandalgarius. The text is written in a pre-Caroline script, curly but surprisingly easy to read (especially if you’ve done it before). I love the colours and simplicity of the drawing. Very few manuscripts from 800 survive and only a fraction of them are illustrated. So this warrior is as rare as he is old. In fact, this may well be the oldest representation of a fighting figure in any European book.

Pic: St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, MS 731 (8th century). Browse the complete manuscript here.

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Anglo-Saxon Sword Pyramid from the Stafforshire Hoard, c. 7th-8th century

The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork ever found. It was discovered in a field near the village of Hammerwich, in Staffordshire on 5 July 2009. The items, over 3,500 in all, date from the time of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia, c. 7th-8th century.

The sword pyramid is one of a pair. These pyramids are hollow inside, with a bar across the opening rather like on a belt buckle. Pyramids like this have been found in a number of Anglo-Saxon graves, lying beside sword scabbards. The pyramids would have adorned a leather strap that would have been attached to a scabbard (which is a cover for a sword).  Straps like this are mentioned in the Viking sagas, where they are called ‘peace bands’. They could be tied around the handle of the sword, securing it in place in the scabbard so warriors were not able to draw their swords suddenly in anger.

The Staffordshire Hoard is remarkable for the extraordinary quantity of sword fittings. Most are of gold and many are beautifully inlaid with garnets. Such elaborate and expensive decoration would have marked out the weapon as the property of the highest echelons of nobility. The discovery of a single sword pyramid is a notable event - to find several pairs together is absolutely unprecedented.