8LA

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Chris Colfer's Script on 8 in LA
  • Chris: I was a very precocious kid. So one day I ended up looking up the word "homosexual" in the dictionary, something along the lines of a romantic attraction between members of the same sex, and I saw it, dawned on me that that's what I was.
  • George: Given your prior testimony about homosexuals, how did you feel when you realized that you were gay?
  • Chris: Well, once I realized what a homosexual was, I was scared by that. I realized this was bad news for me. So I hid it as far away from everyone as I could.
  • George: Around this time, did anyone talk to you about being gay?
  • Chris: When I was in seventh grade, I remember being taunted about being gay.I was called a fagot. I was called a homo, a queer. It was scary going into that building, realizing these kids were taunting me with a word that was so close to the truth. I would go home crying
  • George: Did your parents find out that you were gay?
  • Chris: When I was 13 years old, my parents discovered my journal and for the first time I had admitted to myself that I was gay. And I had actually written those words. And they found that and read it.
  • George: What happened when they read that journal?
  • Chris: They were very upset. They were yelling.I remember my mother looking at me and telling me that I was going to burn in hell.It was shocking. I never heard anything like that from my mother. I mean, you don't get much worse than eternal damnation.
  • George: And what is NARTH?
  • Chris: NARTH stands for the National Association for Reparative therapy for homosexuality. It's a reversal therapy organization based in Encino, California.
  • George: How long were you at NARTH? What ages?
  • Chris: 14 to 16.
  • George: During the time that you were at NARTH, how was your homelife?
  • Chris: Uhm, my mother would tell me that she hated me. Once she told me that she wished she had had an abortion instead of a gay son. She told me that she wished I had been born with Downs Syndrome or I had been mentally retarded.
  • George: Who did you meet with at NARTH?
  • Chris: I met with Dr. Joseph Nicolosi.
  • George: Where would you meet with Mr. Nicolosi?
  • Chris: I did, actually, fly out to California to do in-person sessions. I recall Nicolosi saying that, you know, "Homosexuality is incompatible with what God wants for you, and your parents want you to change," and that this was a bad thing.
  • George: Were you given any advice on how you would be able to suppress your homosexuality, in these therapy sessions?
  • Chris: I remember it as a general admonishment, but not a specific technique, no.
  • Brad: And Mr Cooper, you may cross examine.
  • Kevin: Mr. Kendall. Have you ever lived in the state of California?
  • Chris: No, I have not.
  • Kevin: You have never read a scientific study addressing the concept of sexual orientation, isn't that true?
  • Chris: That is true.
  • Kevin: And isn't it also true that you have never studied whether a person's sexual orientation can change throughout the course of his or her lifetime?
  • Chris: No, I haven't studied it.
  • Kevin: And nothing involved in conversion therapy was yourdecision, it was all your parents' decision. Isn't that true?
  • Chris: Yes.
  • Kevin: At some point you communicated to your parents objections to the counseling treatment but your parents compelled you to go against your will?
  • Chris: That's correct.
  • Kevin: Your only goal for conversion therapy was to survive the experience, isn't that true?
  • Chris: Absolutely true.
  • Kevin: You didn't have the goal of changing your sexual orientation -- I'm sorry, correction. You didn't have the goal of changing your sexual attraction, is that correct?
  • Chris: That's correct.
  • Kevin: Indeed, you admit that you did not truly want to reduce your sexual attraction to persons of the same sex, isn't that true?
  • Chris: That's correct, it is my experience that people don't want to go to programs like NARTH.
  • Chris: You acknowledged in your deposition, did you not, that some people report to have effective results with conversion therapy, isn't that true?
  • Chris: Yes.
  • Kevin: I have no further questions, Your Honor.
  • George: And was it successful in that you were able to suppress your homosexuality?
  • Chris: No. I was just as gay as when I started.
  • George: While you were in conversion therapy, were you introduced to any people who purported -- or were purported to you to have successfully undergone conversion therapy?
  • Chris: I remember during one of the group therapy sessions Nicolosi trotted out his perfect patient, the guy who had been cured of his homosexuality. And his name was Kelly.
  • George: Did meeting Kelly have any impact on your views of conversion therapy?
  • Chris: I remember once, when Nicolosi stepped out of the room, we were talking amongst ourselves. And Kelly told me that later that night he was going to a gay bar and that he was, essentially, just pretending to be cured for the sake of his family.
  • George: Why did you stop going to reversal therapy?
  • Chris: During this whole thing, my life had kind of fallen apart. I didn't have the world that I grew up in, my faith, which was very important to me, my family, which was even more important to me. Everything had just kind of stopped. And I just couldn't take any more. And I realized, at one point, that if I didn't stop going I wasn't going to survive.
  • George: What do you mean by that?
  • Chris: I would have… I would have probably killed myself.
youtube

Chris Cofer in 8 LA on You Tube (by daxterdd)

Script in dialogue box is here

Chris: I was a very precocious kid. So one day I ended up looking up the word “homosexual” in the dictionary, something along the lines of a romantic attraction between members of the same sex, and I saw it, dawned on me that that’s what I was.

George: Given your prior testimony about homosexuals, how did you feel when you realized that you were gay?

Chris: Well, once I realized what a homosexual was, I was scared by that. I realized this was bad news for me. So I hid it as far away from everyone as I could.

George: Around this time, did anyone talk to you about being gay?

Chris: When I was in seventh grade, I remember being taunted about being gay.I was called a fagot. I was called a homo, a queer. It was scary going into that building, realizing these kids were taunting me with a word that was so close to the truth. I would go home crying

George: Did your parents find out that you were gay?

Chris: When I was 13 years old, my parents discovered my journal and for the first time I had admitted to myself that I was gay. And I had actually written those words. And they found that and read it.

George: What happened when they read that journal?

Chris: They were very upset. They were yelling.I remember my mother looking at me and telling me that I was going to burn in hell.It was shocking. I never heard anything like that from my mother. I mean, you don’t get much worse than eternal damnation.

George: And what is NARTH?

Chris: NARTH stands for the National Association for Reparative therapy for homosexuality. It’s a reversal therapy organization based in Encino, California.

George: How long were you at NARTH? What ages?

Chris: 14 to 16.

George: During the time that you were at NARTH, how was your homelife?

Chris: Uhm, my mother would tell me that she hated me. Once she told me that she wished she had had an abortion instead of a gay son. She told me that she wished I had been born with Downs Syndrome or I had been mentally retarded.

George: Who did you meet with at NARTH?

Chris: I met with Dr. Joseph Nicolosi.

George: Where would you meet with Mr. Nicolosi?

Chris: I did, actually, fly out to California to do in-person sessions. I recall Nicolosi saying that, you know, “Homosexuality is incompatible with what God wants for you, and your parents want you to change,” and that this was a bad thing.

George: Were you given any advice on how you would be able to suppress your homosexuality, in these therapy sessions?

Chris: I remember it as a general admonishment, but not a specific technique, no.

Brad: And Mr Cooper, you may cross examine.

Kevin: Mr. Kendall. Have you ever lived in the state of California?

Chris: No, I have not.

Kevin:You have never read a scientific study addressing the concept of sexual orientation, isn’t that true?

Chris: That is true.

Kevin: And isn’t it also true that you have never studied whether a person’s sexual orientation can change throughout the course of his or her lifetime?

Chris: No, I haven’t studied it.

Kevin: And nothing involved in conversion therapy was yourdecision, it was all your parents’ decision. Isn’t that true?

Chris: Yes.

Kevin: At some point you communicated to your parents objections to the counseling treatment but your parents compelled you to go against your will?

Chris: That is correct.

Kevin: Your only goal for conversion therapy was to survive the experience, isn’t that true?

Chris: Absolutely true.

Kevin:  You didn’t have the goal of changing your sexual orientation – I’m sorry, correction. You didn’t have the goal of changing your sexual attraction, is that correct?

Chris: That’s correct.

Kevin: Indeed, you admit that you did not truly want to reduce your sexual attraction to persons of the same sex, isn’t that true?

Chris: That’s correct, it is my experience that people don’t want to go to programs like NARTH.

Chris: You acknowledged in your deposition, did you not, that some people report to have effective results with conversion therapy, isn’t that true?

Chris: Yes.

Kevin: I have no further questions, Your Honor.

George: And was it successful in that you were able to suppress your homosexuality?

Chris: No. I was just as gay as when I started.

George: While you were in conversion therapy, were you introduced to any people who purported – or were purported to you to have successfully undergone conversion therapy?

Chris: I remember during one of the group therapy sessions Nicolosi trotted out

his perfect patient, the guy who had been cured of his homosexuality. And his name was Kelly.

George: Did meeting Kelly have any impact on your views of conversion therapy?

Chris: I remember once, when Nicolosi stepped out of the room, we were talking amongst ourselves. And Kelly told me that later that night he was going to a gay bar and that he was, essentially, just pretending to be cured for the sake of his family.

George: Why did you stop going to reversal therapy?

Chris: During this whole thing, my life had kind of fallen apart. I didn’t have the world that I grew up in, my faith, which was very important to me, my family, which was even more important to me. Everything had just kind of stopped. And I just couldn’t take any more. And I realized, at one point, that if I didn’t stop going I wasn’t going to survive.

George: What do you mean by that?

Chris: I would… I would have probably killed myself.

I just finished watching '8'

I think I’m going to sit on my comfy chair for a while and just process the entire thing. Even though there were quite a few jokes, or things that appeared to be a joke, it was all pretty real, wasn’t it?

I hope this will go to the highest court in America, because if you ask me the defendants don’t have anything that will back them up. And maybe, or rather hopefully, the message from this fight will reach to every corner of America and maybe the entire world and everyone will learn.

You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one (Woohoo, see what I did there c; ). I’m from the Netherlands and I’m proud to say I’m from the first country that made same sex marriages legal. The part about my country in ‘8’ made me jump up and laugh. I joked along with Mr Cooper. How wrong and ignorant can someone be? I have always wondered why people are so afraid.

Everything changes, nothing will be the same as two years ago. Maybe for worse, but most of it for the better. So why aren’t there more people with an open mind who curiously want to know all about the new things that come towards us? Why are there so many people desperately holding on to what they have now, when they can have so much more?

Is it just me being overly optimistic? Or is it them being too ignorant?