80s part

anonymous asked:

Lena and Kara giving a TED talk. Lena has to do most of it because when Kara sees Lena starting to nerd out and enthusiastically talk on stage she forgets 80% of her part and her own name.

love this! although I still don’t know what a TED talk is

bubbling-tar-pit said:
“…there’s a thought that’s been burning away at the back of my head and that’s ‘What would these characters look like in a more modern time?’ Such as the 80s when everything was big, wild hair.”

I haven’t drawn all of the characters in more modern regalia (yet), but here’s a Zib and Mitzi à la 80s pop art - part of a thing I made for Patreon supporters a while back.

I love how every party I go it plays Gasolina, but now it have a whole new meaning to me

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Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter | 1984 | Dir. Joseph Zito

“Well, what happens if a psycho wanders in?”

“He’d probably challenge him to a game of Zaxxon.”

Part I | Part II | Part III | Part V | Part VI | Part VII | Part VIII

random thoughts/reminders about percabeth

Annabeth was without her best friend for 6 months and tbh probably everything reminded her of him

percy MISSED PROM. 

THAT MEANS ANNABETH HAD TO WATCH ALL OF THOSE PROMPOSALS AT HER SCHOOL WHILE HE WAS MISSING

percy saw annabeth’s face when looking at aphrodite

annabeth kissed percy for the first time and told him to be careful and then he immediately blew up Mount St. Helens, woke Typhon and went missing for two weeks 

percy turned into a guinea pig and annabeth will probably never let him forget

percy showed up to his own funeral and it was pretty much the funniest thing ever

percy and annabeth have never experienced as much shit as they have with any other person. I mean sure there were other people with them, but both of the them experienced ALL OF THAT SHIT together pretty much 100% of the time. 

no one will ever know the full story. 

probably every single person in existence cried at their wedding 

just imagine their vows. imagine

Kendrick Lamar and causal misogynoir

Humble by Kendrick Lamar came out and black social media collectively lost they shit. 

Personally, I thought the song was underwhelming, but that is just me.

There are a couple of bars that people have been pointing out as causal misgynoir or blatant misogynoir.

I saw these tweets here on tumblr highlighting this.

So I guess, it compelled me to speak on Kendrick and by extension, conscious rappers’ misogyny.

I never got why Kendrick Lamar and J. Cole have been heralded as women empowering because they are definitely not. It doesn’t excuse them, but I think in the “woke” community in general, people mistake anti-white supremacy with also being an advocate of feminism. And honestly, black men can speak from their experiences easily, and one would think they should be able to speak about oppression in general. But no, they can’t or it is wrong to assume that it is so easy to.

Kendrick’s first commercial album, Section.80, had two tracks that one could argue were women empowering or highlighting sexism(Tammy’s Song and Keisha’s Song). The issue with the songs that they either use the fear of women changing their sexual orientation in response of being with too many fuck niggas or subtly use a horrific tale of sex work gone wrong that somewhat reinforces rape culture and sex shaming under the guise of highlighting it without actually addressing the main contributors of instances like this. 

In summary, they are always from a male perspective which leads to open ended interpretations. To which, I guess that is okay because it is art and art does allow for some incomprehensible instances.

But the problem with these tracks is that they are so open-ended, they do not really penalize a wrong interpretation. I can go into Keisha’s Song and feel the remorse of how women in society are treated and sexualized by men. At the same time, any nigga can go into Keisha’s Song and get the perspective that Keisha should not have been selling her pussy. In fact, that seems to be the theme Kendrick was going for as the transition to HiiPower by Ab-Soul kind of asks the irrelevant question: “What if Keisha was celibate?”

So again, we have an instance of conflicting themes.

Good Kid, Maad City is a semi-autobiographical tale of a young Kendrick Lamar living in the gang and police infested streets of Compton. Good Kid, Maad City is probably my favorite project of his because 1. I love concept albums and 2. it’s rare when “conscious” rappers talk about their experiences with the police and racism. Rappers like Lupe Fiasco and Common like to talk about the concept of racism and white supremacy, but they usually divorce themselves from it. Tupac(mainly because his life is so fucking interesting) and NWA were some rappers who told their stories through song from personal experiences. In fact, Tupac was one of those artists that did both.

But as much as I love gkmc, it is as a concept is sexist because of one persistent character: Sherane. 

Sherane is the girlfriend of Kendrick Lamar during this tale. Her whole entire existence is to be a persistent antagonist to Kendrick’s “purity.” Sherane is the temptress that keeps getting Kendrick in trouble. Sherane is the corrupter. Sherane is the one who gets Kendrick beat up, ignoring that she also got jumped and beat up on with Kendrick. Sherane is the one who gives Kendrick a STD. Sherane, Sherane, Sherane.

Originally posted by allretrogifs

Kendrick does try to absolve some malice that he has towards her towards his crew who do get him to rob people and shit, but ultimately, he and by extension they are the ones who receive salvation and Sherane never does. Sherane is the characterized hood rat that keeps getting Kendrick in trouble.

Obviously, there are some parallels between Sherane and the mainstream interpretation of Eve, but that there lies the problem. Eve is seen as an accomplice of mankind and woman kind’s fall from paradise, instead of the provider of reason and life. Eve saved us from ignorance. The story of Adam and Eve can be interpreted as women being the first to have reason or the ability to reason. Eve is not a bad person.

Because Kendrick tacked on this character and made this biblical parallel that is sexist, there is also some sanctimonious thing Kendrick got going on. Kendrick is never at fault for anything he does ever. What is also peculiar with Kendrick as an artist is that unlike most conscious rappers, he is extremely personal with racism and black empowerment, but as soon as he speaks on women, he divorces himself from the topic and Lupe Fiascos it.

Kendrick’s most commercially and critically successful album, To Pimp A Butterfly. I love this album. Like, it is the embodiment of black power from a cis-heterosexual point of view. This shit is fire. You feel the anger and rage in Blacker The Berry save for those very problematic last two bars. You empathize with Kendrick’s struggle with depression with u. You fucking celebrate black resilience with i and Alright. You take pride in your blackness when you listen to Complexion and Wesley’s Theory. You contemplate materialism and politics with soulful tracks like How Much A Dollar Cost, Mortal Man, and Hood Politics.

This was the quintessential black album before Beyonce took that spot with Lemonade.

Originally posted by queenbeyoncegkc

I love this album. I really do. But again, it does have some shade of misogynoir and continues this trend with Kendrick who can’t seem to mention black women without colluding them with sex or their bodies. You can say complexion was the one song that he didn’t do this, but again, it is subtly a love song so it is still a problem.

And finally we have the Heart Part 4, and Kendrick’s debut single, “Humble” with the above bars about a woman’s ass with stretch marks. The issue here is not that Kendrick is celebrating positive images of a woman’s body. The issue here is that he sexualizes it.

Originally posted by northgang

There is a fine line between sexualizing a woman’s body and celebrating it. And male rapper’s fall for this line every fucking time women are brought up. They always relate to black women while mentioning how beautiful they are. It is always about their attractiveness. The only artists that I feel that succesful averted this in a song directed at black women was Tupac and Keep Ya Head Up and even that was just him bemoaning the accusations of rape that were levied against him(That is complicated). 

In fact, male rappers seem completely incapable of hiding their misogyny unless it comes to their mother and significant other. The only rapper that I know who speaks ill of both are Eminem and Angel Haze and the former is because he has this pseudo Fight Club white male rage thing going on and Haze dealt with a neglectful mother and lover.

This also stems from the fact that womanism and black femininity revolves around beauty and sexuality which contrasts white feminism which usually denounces it or internalizes the feeling, black womanism,because society tends to de-femininize them, are often criticized(unfairly) as being hyper-femme and materialistic, utterly devoid of anti-capitalist sentiment. And black men tend to see aesthetics as the main focus of womanism because it appeals to them and allows black men to continue to sexualize black women without actually addressing black patriarchy.

And don’t think I am forgetting rappers like Jermaine Cole who uses respectability politics in songs like No Role Modelz and homophobia in G.O.M.D. It is as Elexus says, we have to challenge our artists to do better. 

I am going to tag @reverseracism and @fightingmisogynoir because I kind of want to open this up to discussion to black women, and I as a relatively small tumblr blogger, do not have that clout to bring people in this discussion and I also have a dick so it is relatively patronizing of me to speak on shit without having any objections.

10

80s movie kisses (part 3)

i really hope that there are no redemption arcs in the star wars sequel trilogy, period. they feel outdated; like, it fit the late ‘70s and early ‘80s in part because it was very fresh storytelling at the time (esp in genre fiction) and in part because of the culture of the era

but tfa was very updated for the late 2010s, even if the basic story arc was still the monomyth (which doesn’t prescribe redemption or forgiveness or w/e anyway so it’s not A Given Just Because It’s Star Wars)

what would be fresh and culturally relevant storytelling today would be accountability arcs

I’m totally open to Rey and Finn and Poe d fucking up and having to be accountable and fix their own mistakes. I’m totally open to Luke and Han and Leia being acknowledged to have made mistakes in creating the New Republic and the new Jedi and being held accountable to fix them. but the difference is… no one ever held Vader accountable. that’s why i don’t believe he was redeemed, too, bc he got the easy way out of his massive bad choices. he just did one semi-decent thing and immediately died. neither he nor palpatine was ever held accountable for what they did.

i think it’s time to leave the idea of absolution or redemption or forgiveness being some kind of inherent rights to feel as outdated as the rest of 1977’s cultural landscape. that shit has to be earned through hard fucking work on yourself and accountability. just saying you’re sorry and doing nothing to change your behavior bc you conveniently immediately die means nothing tbh

i want to see Kylo Ren’s punishments fit his crimes. i don’t want anyone to forgive him just because he asks for it. I’m about accountability arcs. i want him to have to truly, truly face what he’s done and i want his victims to have the latitude to choose not to forgive him, even if he does get held accountable by some higher authority I’m the story. his victims owe him nothing and never will.

our culture right now needs to make accountability the priority of the decade in fucking general. that includes in our stories. i don’t think you can really call any idea a significant part of a culture until it’s embedded in its stories.

3

save him.