80s nostalgia

I just saw a post where someone complained about adults cosplaying as the kids from Stranger Things and saying in their tags that it’s gross. lol. What? So adults dressing up as a character in a non sexualised way, enjoying 80s nostalgia, who love the tv show, who love these characters and enjoying just the pure innocence and fun are gross? Sure. The only gross thing is that kind of thinking about such an innocent thing.


What’s the matter, my dear, don’t you like your toys?

This spectacular cosplay of Agnes, The Junk Lady from Labyrinth, is the latest awesome creation of Jen Yates of Epbot (previously featured here) and her husband John. They recently debuted Agnes at Megacon, taking turns wearing the costume around the convention, and won Best In Show at the MegaCon costume contest

Visit Epbot to get a good look at all the details Jen and John painstakingly packed into this costume. The even incorporated the he little blue “Ello!” worm riding on the back of Agnes’ junk pile:

But photos alone don’t do justice to this amazing cosplay. To fully appreciate it you must witness Agnes in motion:

And boy, how she Dance Magic-dances:

A video posted by Jen Yates (@epbot) on May 28, 2016 at 8:39pm PDT

Visit Epbot to read all about how Jen and John created this outstanding costume as well as their experience at Megacon.

Top photos by @Dwayne1977, all the rest by Epbot.

[via Fashionably Geek]


I stayed up way too late to finish this, haha. <3 But was worth it. I still want to add more star bead work all over, but for the most part this is done.  This vest has lots of vintage fabric on it, like Care Bears, My Little Pony, Lady Lovely Locks, and Popples.  The Little Twin star fabric is not vintage but it sure is cute as hell. Also has some of my own fabric I got printed at spoonflower, 2 custom Cardcaptor Sakura patches by Cherriesama, resin stars [x], and mint/pink spikes.


Keith Haring painting the National Gallery of Victoria mural in Australia, February 1984.

In 1984 during a three week visit to Australia, New York artist Keith Haring undertook a number of public art events. The artist’s willingness to create a deliberately ephemeral work at the NGV, on glass, accorded with “Haring’s desire to devaluate a presumed superiority of individualistic drawing on paper or canvas over other kinds of cultural artefacts, considering all surface as having equal worth.”

Haring first set up the small ghetto-blaster he carried everywhere, which was decorated by artist Kenny Scharf. John Buckley recalled him at work:

“With his beaut little Kenny Scharf radio that he brought over with him from New York, that was blasting away the whole time. He loved the scissor-lift. He was like a kid with a new toy, because he had never been on a scissor-lift before, andhe just had the best fun with that. [Before too long] he was a pro with it; he knew how to manoeuvre it in the finest possible way.”

Haring had been brought to look at the window only a day or two before he began the mural. Without any template or grid-lines he painted porportionally without any hestiation or mistakes. Haring painting constantly at eye level, not needing to move the cherry picker back to judge how the whole might be coming together. As Haring himself observed at this time:

“One of the things I have been most interested in is the role of chance in situations – letting things happen by themselves. My drawings are never pre-planned. I never sketch a plan for a drawing, even for huge wall murals.”

Haring was also happy to be interrupted at any point, frequently stopping his painting to talk to visiting schoolchildren, sign autographs and quickly sketch souvenir drawings for curious new fans of his work – returning to the mural after each of these intermissions without missing a beat.