75 years of survival

you know, as much as I’m trash for Fallout 4 and recognizing it has a lot of faults, one of the things that Fallout 4 never got right was the passage of time.

And I saw a post about this, and I completely agree, Bethesda really really does not want to do hundreds of years in the future.   

They want so badly to do a “The War Just Ended the World and Here I am Surviving™”.    

This feeling is conveyed in every single frame & setting.

one of the things that was jarring to me in Fallout 4, was them telling me over two hundred years have past, but buildings and cars and everything consumable are still standing.

like no..  cars & buses would be rusted out metal frames, not cherry red cars that have maybe been sitting in the garage for 75 years or smth

wooden houses surviving hundreds of years is completely possible, but that’s with constant upkeep.  Without human intervention, they would collapse back to the earth and become rotted out timbers and a lot of rusty nails.   

I know this personally because i live in the midwest in an old colonial that’s almost a hundred years old, and my dad’s side of the family lives in Appalachia, where you can go hiking in the woods and find the ruins of frontier/historical homes left to vagarities of time.  I’ve personally stumbled upon old abandoned historical homes and barns out in the woods by my Grandma. 

they do not look like the old abandoned wooden homes in Fallout where you can still blow off the dust and live in them 200-300 years later.

I’m saying this because I’m playing Horizon Zero Dawn and this game gets it exactly right

EDIT:

FOR THOSE IN THE REPLIES GOING “RADIATION!!!! (LONG POST)”, please note:

I’ve also played Fallout New Vegas who, with crappier older graphics, still managed to convey the passage of time better

Guess who won the Robins’ Rock, Paper, Scissiors battle to not take care of a flu-ridden Batman on patrol night (while Alfred’s on vacation)…

Dick: *hurriedly changing into his Nightwing suit*

Dick [to Jason, Tim, and Damian]: I survived Bruce for over 75 years. You guys can handle him for one itty bitty night.

Gross Pathology of Melanoma Tumor of the Brain

Melanoma is a cancer of the melanocytes (pigmented cells). While the majority of melanocytes are in the basal layer of the epidermis, giving us our skin pigment, they also exist in the meninges, uvea (in the eyes), inner ear, bones, and colon. As most melanomas are a result of UV radiation damage of melanocytes, the skin is the most common origin of this form of cancer. However, any melanocyte can give rise to it.

While most skin cancers are survivable and detectable, melanomas originating in the skin are the most deadly, causing 75% of all deaths related to skin cancer. Their 5-year survival rate is still over 91% if treated early, however. When not treated in a timely manner, or when originating elsewhere in the body, melanomas frequently spread to the thyroid, brain, and colon.

Reeve Collection at the National Museum of Health. Date unknown.

anonymous asked:

Top 5 most emotional shows

*grabs tissues*

5- 2009 Holy Name Cadets “West Side Story: Conflict and Resolution”.

4- 2011 Phantom Regiment “Juliet”.

3- 2010 Cavaliers “Mad World”.

2- 2013 Madison Scouts “Corps of Brothers - 75 Years of Survival”.

1- 2015 Blue Knights “Because…” *First show ever that brought me to tears*.

I’ve seen all of these shows live and they’ve left me overflowing with emotion.

With 2015 BK, I wasn’t sad or anything, but during the end of “Fly to Paradise” I felt tears rolling down my face. I guess my body felt something my brain couldn’t understand, and that’s why I love drum corps, it’s one of the few things that can have that effect on me.

Spitfire wreckage to be pulled from bog 75 years after crash

An excavation will begin to dig up a Spitfire from the field where it has lain for 75 years since it crashed during the Second World War.

Archaeologists hope to recover surviving parts of the plane from the Cambridgeshire peat before the agricultural landscape is restored to wetlands as part of a major conservation project.

After the excavation, which begins today, the land, owned by the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire, will continue to be turned into natural habitat to link up remaining fragments of fenland and create a 14 square mile Great Fen landscape.

Pilot officer Harold Edwin Penketh was just 20 when he died in the crash near Holme Lode Farm, Holme, on November 22, 1940, on a training flight, after what was thought to be a failure of the oxygen system or a physical failure of the plane. Read more.

Lung (The Living Transplant Series)

The lung is an amazing organ, possibly my favorite. The lung is an interesting organ because although it does not regenerate, we can use parts of it to help others. A living donor is able to donate a lobe of their lung (we have 5 total). The first successful transplant using lobes from living donors was carried out by Professor Starnes in the USA (from USC, fight on!). 

In 1996 he reported a 75% one-year survival rate for 20 CF patients who had had lung transplants from living lobe donors. This is a similar rate to that for conventional transplantation. There were no reports of mortality in the donors. The major advantage of a living lobe transplantation for patients with CF is that the patient gets a transplant instead of a 50% chance of dying on the waiting list.

The recipient has both their lungs removed, and requires two donors to donate a lobe each. Pictured above is not a living lung transplant, as they are rarer and harder to find a good photograph of, but is a lung transplant procedure with the healthy lung getting ready. What do you guys think, would you be able to donate a lobe of your lung to someone?

dailymotion

Madison Scouts 2013: Corps of Brothers-75 Years of Survival.

In case anyone is in the mood for crying tonight.

Part 3 - Gail & Holly - Texting saga continues

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10 | Part 11 | Part 12 | Part 13 | Part 14 | Part 15 | Part 16 | Part 17 | Part 18 | Part 19 | Part 20 | Part 21 | Part 22 | Part 23 | Part 24 | Part 25 | Part 26 | Part 27 | Part 28 | Part 29 | Part 30

Gail:
Hey, how u been doing today?

Lunchbox:
Pretty damn good. Today has been a good day. How about you?

Gail:
Apart from an old lady calling me cynical, fine. Boring even. Why has your day been so good? Find a dinosaur?

Lunchbox:
You make me laugh. Not quite, I did solve a cold case though.

Gail:
Really? I didn’t realise u worked cold cases. From how long ago? At any rate, that is impressive. Congrats.

Lunchbox:
Thank you. 50 years. Detectives are about to talk to the 75-year-old surviving husband.

Gail:
Well that should be a huge relief for him and his family. Pity you can’t be there to see his reaction.

Lunchbox:
Well yes and no. I tend to be a bit awkward in “real people” situations.

Gail:
I somehow find that hard to believe.

Lunchbox:
I tend to just want to hug people for no apparent reason and also run away at the same time. I am kinda awkward like that.

Gail:
Well in this case I think a hug would be warranted.

Lunchbox:
So why was an old lady calling you cynical?

Gail:
Isn’t it obvious? Because I am.

Lunchbox:
In what way?

Gail:
Oh boy.

Lunchbox:
C’mon, you can tell me.

Gail:
:S

Lunchbox:
Deep breath.

Gail:
I don’t know, sometimes I feel like I was put on this planet to be peoples punching bag. Though I guess I am just getting back what I put out there, so it’s not surprising really. I am just a really negative person. I’m like poison, and there are very few people I trust.

Lunchbox:
I wish I were with you right now.

Gail:
Whys that?

Lunchbox:
So I could give you a hug. Where are you?

Gail:
What? U gonna come attack me with those giant arms of yours?

Lunchbox:
We’ll see. I think we should celebrate - my cold case and you trusting me.

Gail:
Well I am sitting alone in the women’s locker room in a dress that is feeling just a little too tight. I think I ate too many donuts today.

Lunchbox:
And I thought the whole cop/donut thing was a cliché.

Gail:
Er, that would be a no, or it is but just not where I am concerned. I have to go to my boss and my colleagues wedding this evening. Did you wanna come?

Lunchbox:
Are you asking me to be your plus one?

Gail:
If you need to label things, then yes, I guess.

Lunchbox:
Lol. Okay, so what time and where?

Gail:
6pm and I will have to get back to you on the where.

Lunchbox:
You expect a girl to be showered and dressed in 45 minutes?

Gail:
I am sure that big brain of yours will figure it out. Besides, you could be wearing a paper bag and still manage to look pretty.

Lunchbox:
Lucky for you I don’t own any paper bags.

Gail:
It’s good to see you are looking after the environment :P

Lunchbox:
I’m not just a pretty face. I help the environment in many other ways. I will tell you all about it sometime.

Gail:
Please don’t. Lol.