70's

Two weeks into the U.S. leg of the 1978 “Yes Tour”, Atlantic recording group Yes played two sold-out shows at Philadelphia’s Spectrum on September 11-12. The new Yes album (their eleventh), “Tormato”, is set for release in two weeks. Shown from left are: (bottom row) Yes’ Rick Wakeman, Lee Abrams of Burkhart-Abrams & Associates, Yes’ Jon Anderson and Steve Howe, Yes’ manager Brian Lane; (top row) Yes’ Alan White, WIOQ air personality Ed Sciaky, Atlantic west coast a&r director John David Kalodner, senior vice president Michiael Klenfner, Yes’ Chris Squire.

From the September 23rd, 1978 issue of Record World Magazine.

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On this day in music history: November 24, 1979 - “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” by Barbra Streisand & Donna Summer hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks, also peaking at #20 on the R&B singles chart on January 5, 1980. Written by Paul Jabara and Bruce Roberts, it is the fourth pop chart topper for Streisand and Summer. Having previously written the Oscar winning smash “Last Dance” (#3 Pop, #8 R&B) for Donna Summer and the pop/disco hit “The Main Event/Fight” (#3 Pop) for singer and actress Barbra Streisand, songwriter Paul Jabara sets his sights on writing a song pairing the two divas. A joint production between Summer’s producer Giorgio Moroder and Streisand’s producer Gary Klein, the basic track for “Tears” is recorded at Rusk Sound Studios in Hollywood, CA and features musicians James Gadson (drums), Neil Stubenhaus (bass), Greg Mathieson (keyboards), Jay Graydon, Jeff “Skunk” Baxter (guitars), and is arranged and conducted by Mathieson. The vocals are recorded at Village Recorders in Los Angeles on August 28, 1979. The track also features background vocals by Maxine & Julia Waters and Luther Vandross (also the vocal arranger). Though the record is an instant smash, it effectively ends Summer’s working relationship with Casablanca Records label head Neil Bogart. Summer is infuriated when she discovers that Bogart has leaked the song to radio early while her then current single “Dim All The Lights” is still climbing the charts. Donna is anxious to see her single reach number one on the pop chart as it would be her first completely self written song to hit number one. She asks her label boss to hold back the new single for a couple weeks, until her record peaks. Bogart agrees, and then goes back on his word leaking “No More Tears”. Radio stations begin playing it immediately, forcing it to be rush released. When this happens, several major stations drop “Dim All The Lights” from their playlists in favor of the new song, causing it to stall at number two, while the duet rockets past it to number one. The uptempo dance track is simultaneously released on Streisand’s album “Wet” and Summer’s greatest hits album “On The Radio”. “Tears” is released with differing mixes on each singers’ album, featuring one or the other more prominently in the mix. Entering the Hot 100 at #59 on October 20, 1979, it rockets to the top of the chart five weeks later. Selling more than two million copies between the 7" and 12" single releases, it is one of the biggest selling singles of 1979. The song is later parodied by comedian Eddie Murphy on his self-titled debut album in 1982. “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” are certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: November 24, 1973 - “The Love I Lost (Part 1)” by Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 2 weeks, also peaking at #7 on the Hot 100 on December 8, 1973. Written and produced by Kenny Gamble & Leon Huff, it is the second R&B chart topper for the Philadelphia, PA vocal group fronted by singer Teddy Pendergrass. Coming off of the huge success of their breakthrough hit “If You Don’t Know Me By Now” and the singles “I Miss You” (#7 R&B, #58 Pop) and “Yesterday I Had The Blues” (#12 R&B, #63 Pop), producer and songwriters Gamble and Huff begins writing new material for R&B vocal quintets’ follow up release. “The Love I Lost” is originally composed as a ballad, but is transformed into an uptempo dance record during the recording sessions for it. Drummer Earl Young (of MFSB) is instrumental in this change, with his commanding cymbal work and solid kick drum tempo setting the pace, along with Pendergrass’ spirited vocals. Released as the first single from the groups’ second album “Black & Blue” in September of 1973, it quickly becomes the Philly Soul groups’ second million seller. “The Love I Lost” is later regarded as a landmark record in what is credited as one that helps usher in the “Disco Era” in pop music. “The Love I Lost (Part 1)” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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Remembering rock music icon Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara in Stone Town, Zanzibar (Tanzania, Africa) ) - September 5, 1946 - November 24, 1991

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On this day in music history: November 24, 1971 - “Muswell Hillbillies”, the ninth album by The Kinks is released (UK release date is on November 26, 1971). Produced by Ray Davies, it is recorded at Morgan Studios in Willesden, North London, UK from August - October 1971. The album takes its name from “Muswell Hill”, the neighborhood in North London where Ray Davies and his brother Dave grew up. The songs reflect on themes of working class life, poverty and the destruction of the old Victorian neighborhoods in London during the 70’s. Though its sales are disappointing (failing to chart in the UK), in time the album is regarded as one of The Kinks’ finest. The albums’ cover photo is taken at The Archway Tavern, pub located in North London, a couple of miles from Muswell Hill.  The album is remastered and reissued numerous times over the years, most recently in November of 2014 with the CD version containing seven additional bonus tracks, and a DVD featuring live performances from “The Old Grey Whistle Test” and the complete performance of BBC TV program “The Kinks At The Rainbow” from July of 1972. “Muswell Hillbillies” peaks at number forty eight on the Billboard Top 200.