70's

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On this day in music history: July 30, 1977 - “I Just Want To Be Your Everything” by Andy Gibb hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 4 weeks (non-consecutive), also peaking at #19 on the R&B singles chart on the same date. Written and co-produced by Barry Gibb, it is the debut and first chart topping single for the then nineteen year old younger brother of the Bee Gees. Gibb will come up with song while vacationing on manager/label boss Robert Stigwood’s estate in Bermuda. During that same period, Barry and Andy will also write “(Love Is) Thicker Than Water” together, which will initially be considered to be the younger Gibb brothers’ debut release. At the last minute they will change their minds and issue “I Just Want To Be Your Everything” instead. Released in late March 1977, the single will enter the Hot 100 at #88 on April 23, 1977. Making a slow but steady ascent up the chart, it will climb to the top of the chart fourteen weeks later. “I Just Want To Be Your Everything” will spend three weeks at the top, and fall as low as #3 (bowing to The Emotions’ “Best Of My Love”) then after four weeks will regain the number one spot on the charts for one more week. “Everything” is the first of three consecutive number one singles Andy Gibb will score on the Hot 100 over the next eleven months. “I Just Want To Be Your Everything” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: July 30, 1977 - “Slide” by Slave hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also peaking at #32 on the Hot 100 on August 20, 1977. Written by Steve Washington, Mark Hicks, Mark Adams, Daniel Webster, Timothy Dozier, Floyd Miller, Thomas Lockett, Orion Wilhoite, and Carter Bradley, it will be the biggest chart single for the Dayton, OH based R&B/Funk band. The last song written for their self-titled debut album, it is born out of a rehearsal jam between Washington and Hicks, with the rest of the band members falling in behind them. They will record the track in a single take the next day. The band’s producer Jeff Dixon will take the completed track to Henry Allen, the head of Atlantic subsidiary Cotillion Records who will immediately sign them to a contract. With most its members just barely out of high school, the young band will enter the studio to record their self-titled debut album. An immediate smash on R&B radio, “Slide” will generate enough attention for it to breach the top 40 on the pop singles chart, and drive sales of their debut album to Gold status in the US.