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RSA: cash asserts royal prerogative

Cash is king in a bear(ish) market. RSA Insurance has opened its books to would-be acquirer Zurich and is willing to recommend a £5.6bn bid at just over 550p a share. When the gnomes beetled down from their alp at the start of this month management had hoped for up to 600p. Since then, shares in similar insurers have fallen about 10 per cent.

They could fall a lot further. Zurich, which has a $3bn regulatory surplus, is offering cash, not equity. So RSA is understandably keen to publish a ballpark price - 550p plus a 3.5p interim dividend - and extend the negotiating deadline by a month.

At 550p, 25p ahead of where Zurich is believed to have opened negotiations, the Swiss group would take RSA out at 19 times estimated 2015 earnings and 14 times the forecast for 2017. That does not look bad when the 2015 price/earnings ratio for the FTSE 100 has dropped from around 16 times to 14 times since the start of the month.

Trouble shooter Stephen Hester was starting to get results with his turnround plan for RSA, a pedestrian non-life business. Shareholders are likely to have edged the board towards the negotiating table. Mr Hester, previously chief executive of Royal Bank of Scotland, faces moving on again after less than two years in his new job. At least this time he is likely to do so with thanks from investors rather than a kick in the pants from the chancellor.

However, Zurich has made no formal offer. It can thus still withdraw, or reduce its price if it wishes. Shell, which made a formal agreed bid for BG in April that was valued at £47bn, does not have that luxury. It is just as well that most of the purchase price would be paid in shares. “For richer, for poorer”, as the Christian marriage service puts it. For richer at RSA, for poorer at BG.

jonathan.guthrie@ft.com

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3 Reasons To Sell RSA Insurance Group plc And Bag Some FTSE 100 Bargains

In yesterday’s Black Monday trading, there was one bright spot in the FTSE 100: RSA Insurance Group (LSE: RSA) rose as investors anticipated an improved offer for the firm from Zurich Insurance.

That hope became a reality this morning, when RSA announced a revised proposal from Zurich proposing a possible all-cash offer of 550p per share.

Although RSA has not yet received a formal offer from Zurich, the two firms have been in close negotiations and RSA’s board has said that it would recommend a 550p offer to shareholders subject to certain other details being agreed.

RSA boss Stephen Hester is thought to have been looking for 600p per share, while Zurich is thought to have been targeting a price range of 500-525p. Today’s deal looks like a decent result all round, in my view, especially given the market slide since discussions started.

However, Zurich hasn’t yet made a formal offer. RSA’s share price reflects this. The insurer’s shares are up by 5% to 520p this morning, 5.5% below the proposed offer price.

The question for shareholders is whether to sell RSA now and go bargain hunting elsewhere, or hold on until a formal offer is received.

Both approaches have pros and cons, but in the remainder of this article, I’m going to highlight a few reasons why selling now could be the most profitable move.

1. RSA isn’t cheap

One way of deciding whether to sell is to ask whether you would buy a share at its current price. While Zurich is taking a very long view with its purchase of RSA and can probably justify paying 550p per share, I don’t think many private investors would pay this much.

RSA shares have now risen by more than 25% since early July, from a low of around 400p. This has left the insurer trading on a fairly pricey 2016 forecast P/E of 16.4, with a prospective yield of just 2.8%.

2. Other insurers look cheap

In contrast, RSA peer Aviva trades on a 2016 forecast P/E of 9.0 with a prospective yield of 5.2%, while commercial insurer Amlin has a 2016 P/E of 12, and a whopping forecast yield of more than 6%.

By selling RSA and buying an insurer such as Aviva or Amlin, you should be able to lock in a high yield at a very reasonable price. This approach also avoids the risk of a sharp loss if the Zurich offer isn’t confirmed.

3. Buy when others are fearful

Warren Buffett famously suggested that investors should be greedy when others are fearful. Monday’s slide suggests there is a lot of fear in the market, but for investors with a long-term view, I reckon there are plenty of bargains on offer.

Consider Royal Dutch Shell, trading at 9.8 times 2016 forecast earnings with a yield of 7.4%. Or Neil Woodford favourite GlaxoSmithKline, which offers a yield of 6.2%.

Investors looking for a new turnaround play might want to consider Standard Chartered, Centrica or perhaps J Sainsbury, all of which offer yields of more than 4% — plus the potential for longer-term capital growth.

The FTSE looks like a buyers’ market to me.

If you’re on the hunt for new income and growth investments for your portfolio, I’d suggest a look at the companies featured in 5 Shares To Retire On before you hit the buy button.

These companies are all proven performers, but several of them have been battered by the market sell-off and now look decidedly cheap.

This exclusive report is FREE and carries no obligation.

For immediate access to this valuable report, simply click here now.

More reading

Roland Head owns shares of Royal Dutch Shell, Aviva, GlaxoSmithKline and Standard Chartered. The Motley Fool UK has recommended shares in GSK and Centrica. We Fools don’t all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.

3 Reasons To Sell RSA Insurance Group plc And Bag Some FTSE 100 Bargains

In yesterday’s Black Monday trading, there was one bright spot in the FTSE 100: RSA Insurance Group (LSE: RSA) rose as investors anticipated an improved offer for the firm from Zurich Insurance.

That hope became a reality this morning, when RSA announced a revised proposal from Zurich proposing a possible all-cash offer of 550p per share.

Although RSA has not yet received a formal offer from Zurich, the two firms have been in close negotiations and RSA’s board has said that it would recommend a 550p offer to shareholders subject to certain other details being agreed.

RSA boss Stephen Hester is thought to have been looking for 600p per share, while Zurich is thought to have been targeting a price range of 500-525p. Today’s deal looks like a decent result all round, in my view, especially given the market slide since discussions started.

However, Zurich hasn’t yet made a formal offer. RSA’s share price reflects this. The insurer’s shares are up by 5% to 520p this morning, 5.5% below the proposed offer price.

The question for shareholders is whether to sell RSA now and go bargain hunting elsewhere, or hold on until a formal offer is received.

Both approaches have pros and cons, but in the remainder of this article, I’m going to highlight a few reasons why selling now could be the most profitable move.

1. RSA isn’t cheap

One way of deciding whether to sell is to ask whether you would buy a share at its current price. While Zurich is taking a very long view with its purchase of RSA and can probably justify paying 550p per share, I don’t think many private investors would pay this much.

RSA shares have now risen by more than 25% since early July, from a low of around 400p. This has left the insurer trading on a fairly pricey 2016 forecast P/E of 16.4, with a prospective yield of just 2.8%.

2. Other insurers look cheap

In contrast, RSA peer Aviva trades on a 2016 forecast P/E of 9.0 with a prospective yield of 5.2%, while commercial insurer Amlin has a 2016 P/E of 12, and a whopping forecast yield of more than 6%.

By selling RSA and buying an insurer such as Aviva or Amlin, you should be able to lock in a high yield at a very reasonable price. This approach also avoids the risk of a sharp loss if the Zurich offer isn’t confirmed.

3. Buy when others are fearful

Warren Buffett famously suggested that investors should be greedy when others are fearful. Monday’s slide suggests there is a lot of fear in the market, but for investors with a long-term view, I reckon there are plenty of bargains on offer.

Consider Royal Dutch Shell, trading at 9.8 times 2016 forecast earnings with a yield of 7.4%. Or Neil Woodford favourite GlaxoSmithKline, which offers a yield of 6.2%.

Investors looking for a new turnaround play might want to consider Standard Chartered, Centrica or perhaps J Sainsbury, all of which offer yields of more than 4% – plus the potential for longer-term capital growth.

The FTSE looks like a buyers’ market to me.

If you’re on the hunt for new income and growth investments for your portfolio, I’d suggest a look at the companies featured in 5 Shares To Retire On before you hit the buy button.

These companies are all proven performers, but several of them have been battered by the market sell-off and now look decidedly cheap.

This exclusive report is FREE and carries no obligation.

For immediate access to this valuable report, simply click here now.

Roland Head owns shares of Royal Dutch Shell, Aviva, GlaxoSmithKline and Standard Chartered. The Motley Fool UK has recommended shares in GSK and Centrica. We Fools don’t all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.

3 Reasons To Sell RSA Insurance Group plc And Bag Some FTSE 100 Bargains

In yesterday’s Black Monday trading, there was one bright spot in the FTSE 100: RSA Insurance Group (RSA.L) rose as investors anticipated an improved offer for the firm from Zurich Insurance.

That hope became a reality this morning, when RSA announced a revised proposal from Zurich proposing a possible all-cash offer of 550p per share.

Although RSA has not yet received a formal offer from Zurich, the two firms have been in close negotiations and RSA’s board has said that it would recommend a 550p offer to shareholders subject to certain other details being agreed.

RSA boss Stephen Hester is thought to have been looking for 600p per share, while Zurich is thought to have been targeting a price range of 500-525p. Today’s deal looks like a decent result all round, in my view, especially given the market slide since discussions started.

However, Zurich hasn’t yet made a formal offer. RSA’s share price reflects this. The insurer’s shares are up by 5% to 520p this morning, 5.5% below the proposed offer price.

The question for shareholders is whether to sell RSA now and go bargain hunting elsewhere, or hold on until a formal offer is received.

Both approaches have pros and cons, but in the remainder of this article, I’m going to highlight a few reasons why selling now could be the most profitable move.

1. RSA isn’t cheap

One way of deciding whether to sell is to ask whether you would buy a share at its current price. While Zurich is taking a very long view with its purchase of RSA and can probably justify paying 550p per share, I don’t think many private investors would pay this much.

RSA shares have now risen by more than 25% since early July, from a low of around 400p. This has left the insurer trading on a fairly pricey 2016 forecast P/E of 16.4, with a prospective yield of just 2.8%.

2. Other insurers look cheap

In contrast, RSA peer Aviva trades on a 2016 forecast P/E of 9.0 with a prospective yield of 5.2%, while commercial insurer Amlin has a 2016 P/E of 12, and a whopping forecast yield of more than 6%.

By selling RSA and buying an insurer such as Aviva or Amlin, you should be able to lock in a high yield at a very reasonable price. This approach also avoids the risk of a sharp loss if the Zurich offer isn’t confirmed.

3. Buy when others are fearful

Warren Buffett famously suggested that investors should be greedy when others are fearful. Monday’s slide suggests there is a lot of fear in the market, but for investors with a long-term view, I reckon there are plenty of bargains on offer.

Consider Royal Dutch Shell, trading at 9.8 times 2016 forecast earnings with a yield of 7.4%. Or Neil Woodford favourite GlaxoSmithKline, which offers a yield of 6.2%.

Investors looking for a new turnaround play might want to consider Standard Chartered, Centrica or perhaps J Sainsbury, all of which offer yields of more than 4% – plus the potential for longer-term capital growth.

The FTSE looks like a buyers’ market to me.

If you’re on the hunt for new income and growth investments for your portfolio, I’d suggest a look at the companies featured in 5 Shares To Retire On before you hit the buy button.

These companies are all proven performers, but several of them have been battered by the market sell-off and now look decidedly cheap.

This exclusive report is FREE and carries no obligation.

For immediate access to this valuable report, simply click here now.

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Boardroom trades, August 15

Vindi Banga has spent four years as a non-executive at Marks and Spencer, a period in which the share price has risen by about two-thirds. Like most new directors he duly bought into the company when he joined but invested only £6,600 (about 17 per cent of his basic fee as a non-executive at the time). Shares stormed ahead over an eight-month period since last October topping out just short of 600p in May, as the company reported a return to growth in clothes sales.

Last month, the board reported another quarterly decline in the core activity, and the head of clothing quit his post. Competition in the clothing sector is hotting up, with George Davies, the former Next man behind the M&S Per Una range considering a return to the UK market, and Andy Bond, the former chief executive of Asda, who has just launched the Pep & Co value fashion chain. As a partner in an asset management group Mr Banga is not a rag man by trade, but knows about investments and is gambling on a return to growth, having bought a substantive stake last Wednesday.

There was a further crop of trades at aerospace group Rolls-Royce with three non-executives following up purchases by executive colleagues reported here a month ago. Those closer to the business gained first mover advantage buying shares in the jet engine manufacturer at 747p in the wake of another profit warning. Although the stock had been lower that week, the price provided a launch pad for rapid recovery, so chairman Ian Davies and his fellow non-executives paid 812p last Friday buying as the bounce had lost momentum. All three have made regular trades this year.

Investors who followed the December buying signal at Brammer would have been in the money during the first half of this year after three senior managers proved that their trades can be just as prescient as members of the board. Buying at around 300p that month, shares topped 400p before March was out but a May profit warning brought the party to an end. Paul Thwaite is unlikely to have been in party mood last week, having been forced to sell shares under a divorce settlement, but he bought some back on Wednesday.

Matthew Ingle became the fifth director or senior manager to part with shares in Howden Joinery this year, banking more than £6m for a quarter of his stake. The disposals have not hurt the company’s shares which added 27 per cent over the first half of this year as Howden continued to buy back its own stock and report results in line with expectations. However, concern over margins has pegged back the shares more recently.

New Aston Martin GT12 Is the V12 Track Brute We Wished For | car-tube.org

New Aston Martin GT12 Is the V12 Track Brute We Wished For | car-tube.org

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Reviews of the Aston Martin GT12 have started to surface, with Chris Harris being one of the first to deliver his verdict on the latest hardcore Aston Martin.

Limited to just 100 units, the Aston Martin GT12is essentially the road-going version of the GT3 race car. Lighter by 100kg and more powerful than the V12 Vantage S, the 600PS (592hp) track weapon is one of the most special road cars…

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