6 adults

Super detailed questions about your OCs

1. What’s their full name? Why was that chosen? Does it mean anything?
2. Do they have any titles? How did they get them?
3. Did they have a good childhood? What are fond memories they have of it? What’s a bad memory?
4. What is their relationship with their parents? What’s a good and bad memory with them? Did they know both parents?
5. Do they have any siblings? What’s their names? What is their relationship with them? Has their relationship changed since they were kids to adults?
6. What were they like at school? Did they enjoy it? Did they finish? What level of higher education did they reach? What subjects did they enjoy? Which did they hate?
7. Did they have lots of friends as a child? Did they keep any of their childhood friends into adulthood?
8. Did they have pets as a child? Do they have pets as an adult? Do they like animals?
9. Do animals like them? Do they get on well with animals?
10. Do they like children? Do children like them? Do they have or want any children? What would they be like as a parent? Or as a godparent/babysitter/ect?
11. Do they have any special diet requirements? Are they a vegetarian? Vegan? Have any allergies?
12. What is their favourite food?
13. What is their least favourite food?
14. Do they have any specific memories of food/a restaurant/meal?
15. Are they good at cooking? Do they enjoy it? What do others think of their cooking?
16. Do they collect anything? What do they do with it? Where do they keep it?
17. Do they like to take photos? What do they like to take photos of? Selfies? What do they do with their photos?
18. What’s their favourite genre of: books, music, tv shows, films, video games and anything else
19. What’s their least favourite genres?
20. Do they like musicals? Music in general? What do they do when they’re favourite song comes?
21. Do they have a temper? Are they patient? What are they like when they do lose their temper?
22. What are their favourite insults to use? What do they insult people for? Or do they prefer to bitch behind someone’s back?
23. Do they have a good memory? Short term or long term? Are they good with names? Or faces?
24. What is their sleeping pattern like? Do they snore? What do they like to sleep on? A soft or hard mattress?
25. What do they find funny? Do they have a good sense of humour? Are they funny themselves?
26. How do they act when they’re happy? Do they sing? Dance? Hum? Or do they hide their emotions?
27. What makes them sad? Do they cry regularly? Do they cry openly or hide it? What are they like they are sad?
28. What is their biggest fear? What in general scares them? How do they act when they’re scared?
29. What do they do when they find out someone else’s fear? Do they tease them? Or get very over protective?
30. Do they exercise? Regularly? Or only when forced? What do they act like pre-work out and post-work out?
31. Do they drink? What are they like drunk? What are they like hungover? How do they act when other people are drunk or hungover? Kind or teasing?
32. What do they dress like? What sorta shops do they buy clothes from? Do they wear the fashion that they like? What do they wear to sleep? Do they wear makeup? What’s their hair like?
33. What underwear do they wear? Boxers or briefs? Lacey? Comfy granny panties?
34. What is their body type? How tall are they? Do they like their body?
35. What’s their guilty pleasure? What is their totally unguilty pleasure?
36. What are they good at? What hobbies do they like? Can they sing?
37. Do they like to read? Are they a fast or slow reader? Do they like poetry? Fictional or non fiction?
38. What do they admire in others? What talents do they wish they had?
39. Do they like letters? Or prefer emails/messaging?
40. Do they like energy drinks? Coffee? Sugary food? Or can they naturally stay awake and alert?
41. What’s their sexuality? What do they find attractive? Physically and mentally? What do they like/need in a relationship?
42. What are their goals? What would they sacrifice anything for? What is their secret ambition?
43. Are they religious? What do they think of religion? What do they think of religious people? What do they think of non religious people?
44. What is their favourite season? Type of weather? Are they good in the cold or the heat? What weather do they complain in the most?
45. How do other people see them? Is it similar to how they see themselves?
46. Do they make a good first impression? Does their first impression reflect them accurately? How do they introduce themselves?
47. How do they act in a formal occasion? What do they think of black tie wear? Do they enjoy fancy parties and love to chit chat or loathe the whole event?
48. Do they enjoy any parties? If so what kind? Do they organise the party or just turn up? How do they act? What if they didn’t want to go but were dragged along by a friend?
49. What is their most valued object? Are they sentimental? Is there something they have to take everywhere with them?
50. If they could only take one bag of stuff somewhere with them: what would they pack? What do they consider their essentials?

youtube

shiro’s birthday card!!! LEAKED!!!

:^)) tfw when Memories™ pop up :^)) and you gotta wonder why no one noticed you were an abused kid :^))) the symptoms were all there :^)) I wasn’t just a ‘weird kid’ like y'all said I was :^))) adults always say they know more about kids than they let on but if that’s really the case they must really not give a shit about us when the ignore very obvious signs of abuse :^^))) I spoke about some fucked up shit right in front of teachers and parents and none of them said anything, none of them reacted :^)) if they’re actually listening they don’t give a damn

Things to expect in your first year of uni:

1. Sometimes you don’t make a solid group of friends straight away, so don’t feel too upset. I’m a second year and I’ve only really now started adding people on Facebook and forming casual friendships. It happens. If you do make good friends - awesome.

2.  Pre-readings and online modules prior to lectures and/or tutorials. DO THEM. Skim through readings if you’re short on time, and do the prep work the week before. Trust and save yourself from having to go through everything within days (multiplied by X units) before your exams.

3. Realising once you’re in your new home no, you did not need to pack every belonging you have, because yes, everything DOES. NOT. FIT.

4. Realising how much stuff you have but don’t need.

5. If moving out of home, bills and rent or paying for accommodation can be STRESSFUL.

6. ~Adulting~

7. How sometimes boring general core units are. It sucks but have to be done.

8. Your tutor not haggling you about studying more and stuff, ‘cause that’s all on you. If it’s the tutor’s fault, I would suggest bringing that up with the head of the school/faculty or even your student guild to think of solutions.

9. By approx. week 5 to week 6, class numbers begin to exponentially drop, most significantly within the last three weeks of semester.

10. Yes, older people study at uni too. Most of them are nice, genuine, and nervous. Yes, sometimes they do older people things.

11. There are many, many intelligent and kind people in university.

12. Some people have significantly different work ethics.

13. Going to the wrong class across the year is a-OK. I walked into an upper year math lecture and realised the lecturer wasn’t who mine actually was. Whispered very loudly “OH MY GOD” and walked straight out. We’ve all been there. Just kindly walk out and pretend nothing even happened.

14. University life is more than academics. Take a leap and do things.

15. You’ll have to do more than your degree to get to where you want to be.

16.  People party a lot, you can be one of them but if you want to keep up your grades, please balance it with your studies, work and other commitments!

17. University can either be harder or easier than high school. For me? Easier so far. Further units will be difficult. But you’ll learn a lot of useful and enriching knowledge which is worth something more than what you might learn in high school.

18. Seating plans don’t exist, but if you’re gonna change seats every week, you’re most definitely messin’ up the system.

What other things can first years expect? Whether you’re fresh out of first-year like me or a tertiary education veteran, I’ll make sure to update this continuously with all of our input!

Lisa Lawrence’s Archetypes and Symbols List

Archetypes and Symbols

SITUATION ARCHETYPES

1. The Quest – This motif describes the search for someone or some talisman which, when found and brought back, will restore fertility to a wasted land, the desolation of which is mirrored by a leader’s illness and disability.

2. The Task – This refers to a possibly superhuman feat that must be accomplished in order to fulfill the ultimate goal.

3. The Journey – The journey sends the hero in search for some truth of information necessary to restore fertility, justice, and/or harmony to the kingdom. The journey includes the series of trials and tribulations the hero faces along the way. Usually the hero descends into a real or psychological hell and is forced to discover the blackest truths, quite often concerning his faults. Once the hero is at this lowest level, he must accept personal responsibility to return to the world of the living.

4. The Initiation – This situation refers to a moment, usually psychological, in which an individual comes into maturity. He or she gains a new awareness into the nature of circumstances and problems and understands his or her responsibility for trying to resolve the dilemma. Typically, a hero receives a calling, a message or signal that he or she must make sacrifices and become responsible for getting involved in the problem. Often a hero will deny and question the calling and ultimately, in the initiation, will accept responsibility.

5. The Ritual – Not to be confused with the initiation, the ritual refers to an organized ceremony that involves honored members of a given community and an Initiate. This situation officially brings the young man or woman into the realm of the community’s adult world.

6. The Fall – Not to be confused with the awareness in the initiation, this archetype describes a descent in action from a higher to a lower state of being, an experience which might involve defilement, moral imperfection, and/or loss of innocence. This fall is often accompanied by expulsion from a kind of paradise as penalty for disobedience and/or moral transgression.

7. Death and Rebirth – The most common of all situational archetypes, this motif grows out of the parallel between the cycle of nature and the cycle of life. It refers to those situations in which someone or something, concrete and/or metaphysical dies, yet is accompanied by some sign of birth or rebirth.

8. Nature vs. Mechanistic World – Expressed in its simplest form, this refers to situations which suggest that nature is good whereas the forces of technology are bad.

9. Battle Between Good and Evil – These situations pit obvious forces which represent good and evil against one another; typically, good ultimately triumphs over evil despite great odds.

10. The Unhealable Wound – This wound, physical or psychological, cannot be healed fully. This would also indicate a loss of innocence or purity. Often the wounds’ pain drives the sufferer to desperate measures of madness.

11. The Magic Weapon – Sometimes connected with the task, this refers to a skilled individual hero’s ability to use a piece of technology in order to combat evil, continue a journey, or to prove his or her identity as a chosen individual.

12. Father-Son Conflict – Tension often results from separation during childhood or from an external source when the individuals meet as men and where the mentor often has a higher place in the affections of the hero than the natural parent. Sometimes the conflict is resolved in atonement.

13. Innate Wisdom vs. Educated Stupidity – Some characters exhibit wisdom and understanding intuitively as opposed to those supposedly in charge.

SYMBOLIC ARCHETYPES

1. Light vs. Darkness – Light usually suggests hope, renewal, OR intellectual illumination; darkness implies the unknown, ignorance, or despair.

2. Water vs. Desert – Because water is necessary to life and growth, it commonly appears as a birth or rebirth symbol. Water is used in baptism services, which solemnizes spiritual births. Similarly, the appearance of rain in a work of literature can suggest a character’s spiritual birth.

3. Heaven vs. Hell – Humanity has traditionally associated parts of the universe not accessible to it with the dwelling places of the primordial forces that govern its world. The skies and mountaintops house its gods; the bowels of the earth contain the diabolic forces that inhabit its universe.

4. Haven vs. Wilderness – Places of safety contrast sharply against the dangerous wilderness. Heroes are often sheltered for a time to regain health and resources.

5. Supernatural Intervention – The gods intervene on the side of the hero or sometimes against him.

6. Fire vs. Ice – Fire represents knowledge, light, life, and rebirth while ice like desert represents ignorance, darkness, sterility, and death.

7. Colors

A. Black (darkness) – chaos, mystery, the unknown, before existence, death, the unconscious, evil

B. Red – blood, sacrifice; violent passion, disorder, sunrise, birth, fire, emotion, wounds, death, sentiment, mother, Mars, the note C, anger, excitement, heat, physical stimulation

C. Green – hope, growth, envy, Earth, fertility, sensation, vegetation, death, water, nature, sympathy, adaptability, growth, Jupiter and Venus, the note G, envy

D. White (light) – purity, peace, innocence, goodness, Spirit, morality, creative force, the direction East, spiritual thought

E. Orange – fire, pride, ambition, egoism, Venus, the note D

F. Blue – clear sky, the day, the sea, height, depth, heaven, religious feeling, devotion, innocence, truth, spirituality, Jupiter, the note F, physical soothing and cooling

G. Violet – water, nostalgia, memory, advanced spirituality, Neptune, the note B

H. Gold – Majesty, sun, wealth, corn (life dependency), truth

I. Silver – Moon, wealth

8. Numbers:

A. Three – the Trinity (Father, Son, Holy Ghost); Mind, Body, Spirit, Birth, Life, Death

B. Four – Mankind (four limbs), four elements, four seasons

C. Six – devil, evil

D. Seven – Divinity (3) + Mankind (4) = relationship between man and God, seven deadly sins, seven days of week, seven days to create the world, seven stages of civilization, seven colors of the rainbow, seven gifts of Holy Spirit.

9. Shapes:

A. Oval – woman, passivity

B. Triangle – communication, between heaven and earth, fire, the number 3, trinity, aspiration, movement upward, return to origins, sight, light

C. Square – pluralism, earth, firmness, stability, construction, material solidity, the number four

D. Rectangle – the most rational, most secure

E. Cross – the Tree of life, axis of the world, struggle, martyrdom, orientation in space

F. Circle – Heaven, intellect, thought, sun, the number two, unity, perfection, eternity, oneness, celestial realm, hearing, sound

G. Spiral – the evolution of the universe, orbit, growth, deepening, cosmic motion, relationship between unity and multiplicity, macrocosm, breath, spirit, water

10. Nature:

A. Air – activity, creativity, breath, light, freedom (liberty), movement

B. Ascent – height, transcendence, inward journey, increasing intensity

C. Center – thought, unity, timelessness, spacelessness, paradise, creator, infinity,

D. Descent – unconscious, potentialities of being, animal nature

E. Duality – Yin-Yang, opposites, complements, positive-negative, male-female, life-death

F. Earth – passive, feminine, receptive, solid

G. Fire – the ability to transform, love, life, health, control, sun, God, passion, spiritual energy, regeneration

H. Lake – mystery, depth, unconscious

I. Crescent moon – change, transition

J. Mountain – height, mass, loftiness, center of the world, ambition, goals

K. Valley – depression, low-points, evil, unknown

L. Sun – Hero, son of Heaven, knowledge, the Divine eye, fire, life force, creative-guiding force, brightness, splendor, active awakening, healing, resurrection, ultimate wholeness

M. Water – passive, feminine

N. Rivers/Streams – life force, life cycle

O. Stars – guidance

P. Wind – Holy Spirit, life, messenger

Q. Ice/Snow – coldness, barrenness

R. Clouds/Mist – mystery, sacred

S. Rain – life giver

T. Steam – transformation to the Holy Spirit

U. Cave – feminine

V. Lightning – intuition, inspiration

W. Tree – where we learn, tree of life, tree of knowledge

X. Forest – evil, lost, fear

11. Objects:

A. Feathers – lightness, speed

B. Shadow – our dark side, evil, devil

C. Masks – concealment

D. Boats/Rafts – safe passage

E. Bridge – change, transformation

F. Right hand – rectitude, correctness

G. Left hand – deviousness

H. Feet – stability, freedom

I. Skeleton – mortality

J. Heart – love, emotions

K. Hourglass – the passage of time

CHARACTER ARCHETYPES

1. The Hero – In its simplest form, this character is the one ultimately who may fulfill a necessary task and who will restore fertility, harmony, and/or justice to a community. The hero character is the one who typically experiences an initiation, who goes the community’s ritual (s), et cetera. Often he or she will embody characteristics of YOUNG PERSON FROM THE PROVINCES, INITIATE, INNATE WISDOM, PUPIL, and SON.

2. Young Person from the Provinces – This hero is taken away as an infant or youth and raised by strangers. He or she later returns home as a stranger and able to recognize new problems and new solutions.

3. The Initiates – These are young heroes who, prior to the quest, must endure some training and ritual. They are usually innocent at this stage.

4. Mentors – These individuals serve as teachers or counselors to the initiates. Sometimes they work as role models and often serve as father or mother figure. They teach by example the skills necessary to survive the journey and quest.

5. Hunting Group of Companions – These loyal companions are willing to face any number of perils in order to be together.

6. Loyal Retainers – These individuals are like the noble sidekicks to the hero. Their duty is to protect the hero. Often the retainer reflects the hero’s nobility.

7. Friendly Beast –These animals assist the hero and reflect that nature is on the hero’s side.

8. The Devil Figure – This character represents evil incarnate. He or she may offer worldly goods, fame, or knowledge to the protagonist in exchange for possession of the soul or integrity. This figure’s main aim is to oppose the hero in his or her quest.

9. The Evil Figure with the Ultimately Good Heart – This redeemable devil figure (or servant to the devil figure) is saved by the hero’s nobility or good heart.

10. The Scapegoat – An animal or more usually a human whose death, often in a public ceremony, excuses some taint or sin that has been visited upon the community. This death often makes theme more powerful force to the hero.

11. The Outcast – This figure is banished from a community for some crime (real or imagined). The outcast is usually destined to become a wanderer.

12. The Earth Mother – This character is symbolic of fulfillment, abundance, and fertility; offers spiritual and emotional nourishment to those who she contacts; often depicted in earth colors, with large breasts and hips.

13. The Temptress – Characterized by sensuous beauty, she is one whose physical attraction may bring about the hero’s downfall.

14. The Platonic Ideal – This source of inspiration often is a physical and spiritual ideal for whom the hero has an intellectual rather than physical attraction.

15. The Unfaithful Wife – This woman, married to a man she sees as dull or distant, is attracted to a more virile or interesting man.

16. The Damsel in Distress – This vulnerable woman must be rescued by the hero. She also may be used as a trap, by an evil figure, to ensnare the hero.

17. The Star-Crossed Lovers – These two characters are engaged in a love affair that is fated to end in tragedy for one or both due to the disapproval of society, friends, family, or the gods.

18. The Creature of Nightmare – This monster, physical or abstract, is summoned from the deepest, darkest parts of the human psyche to threaten the lives of the hero/heroine. Often it is a perversion or desecration of the human body.

RECOGNIZING PATTERNS

The following list of patterns comes from the book How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster who teaches at the University of Michigan. If you are serious about literary analysis, then it is highly recommended that you buy this book. It goes into detail what is just briefly mentioned and is written in such a lively, witty voice that it does not read like a textbook at all! It will be well worth your time and effort to read it.

Ø  Trips tend to become quests to discover self.

Ø  Meals together tend to be acts of communion/community or isolation.

Ø  Ghosts, vampires, monsters, and nasty people and sometimes simply the antagonists are not about supernatural brew-ha-ha; they tend to depict some sort of exploitation.

Ø  There’s only one story. Look for allusions and archetypes.

Ø  Weather matters.

Ø  Violence and be both literal and figurative.

Ø  Symbols can be objects, images, events, and actions.

Ø  Sometimes a story is meant to change us, the readers, and through us change society.

Ø  Keep an eye out for Christ-figures.

Ø  Flying tends to represent freedom. What do you think falling represents?

Ø  Getting dunked or just sprinkled in something wet tends to be a baptism.

Ø  Geography tends to be a metaphor for the psyche.

Ø  Seasons tend to be traditional symbols.

Ø  Disabilities, Scars, and Deformities show character and theme.

Ø  Heart disease tends to represent problems with character and society.

Ø  So do illness and disease.

Ø  Read with your imagination.

Ø  Irony trumps everything!

Ø  Remember the difference between public and private symbols.

MLA Citation (7th Edition)

Lawrence, Lisa. “Archetypes and Symbols.” West Morris Central High School. West Morris Regional High School District, n.d. Web. 23 Jan. 2013. <http://central.wmrhsd.org/FACULTY…/Archetypesandsymbols.pdf>.

“Good wombs hath borne bad sons.” - William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 1, Scene 2, Page 6

Remembering and acknowledging the mothers of some of history’s most notorious serial killers and mass murderers. No one can truly know how they would react to their own flesh and blood committing acts of true horror unless it actually happens to them. Let us hope it never happens to you. But to these women it did. Their own sons went out and committed acts of unspeakable cruelty and malice. In some cases they defended their own son’s guilt in the face of irrefutable evidence out of the blindness of love, others have been brave enough to learn from their son’s acts and speak out, others have understandably hidden from the public eye, and most tragic of all - some of these women were the victims of their own sons.

Clockwise, starting from the top left.

Sue Klebold, mother of Columbine High School shooter Dylan Klebold - On April 20th 1999 Sue Klebold’s son Dylan called out ‘Bye!’ to her before leaving the house unusually early. This was the last word she would ever here from him as later that day he murdered five people during the Columbine High School massacre. Sue is perhaps the most well known of these women, speaking publicly several times about her son and writing a book ‘A Mother’s Reckoning’ about her son and her experience as well as campaigning tirelessly for greater recognition on mental health issues.

Eleanor Louise Bundy, mother of Ted Bundy - Eleanor Louise Bundy gave birth to Ted unmarried. His true father is unknown and for many years during Ted’s childhood he lived under the masquerade that his mother was actually his sister. Eleanor long proclaimed her son’s innocence even during his Florida trials, describing Ted as the ‘perfect son’. Bundy murdered at least 35 women and was executed in Florida in 1989. Eleanor Louise Bundy died in 2012.

Joyce Dahmer, mother of Milwaukee Cannibal Jeffrey Dahmer - During much of Jeffrey’s childhood his mother Joyce and father Lionel were embroiled in bitter arguments contributing to Jeffrey’s descent into alcoholism. Joyce Dahmer stayed in contact with her son Jeffrey during his incarceration, stating that in her weekly phone calls whenever she conveyed worry for her son Jeffrey would answer with comments to the effect of: “It doesn’t matter, Mom. I don’t care if something happens to me.” Joyce Dahmer died in 2000, six years after her son was murdered in prison.

Kathy Harris, mother of Columbine High School Shooter Eric Harris - Kathy Harris has, unlike Sue Klebold, made no media appearances since her son’s murder of eight people during the Columbine High School massacre and his subsequent suicide. Sue Klebold has stated that she had been in contact with the Harris’ since the massacre but would not want to speak on Kathy or Eric’s father Wayne’s behalf. One can only imagine what a heartbreaking experience Kathy has had.

Peggy Brady, mother of Moors Murderer Ian Brady - Described as ‘Britain’s most evil serial killer’ Brady was responsible for the murder of at least five children alongside his accomplice Myra Hindley. Ian was born to his unmarried mother Peggy in Glasgow, Scotland in 1938. The identity of Ian’s father remains unverified and he was given up for adoption to a local couple a few months after his birth as Peggy was unable to raise him alone. The mother and son remained in contact however, Brady even being permitted to leave prison in 2013 to visit his mother aged in her 90′s. Ian Brady died earlier this year aged 79.

Kitty Menendez, mother of Erik and Lyle Menendez - Mary Louise Menendez worked as a teacher until she quit after the birth of her son Lyle. She attended the University of Southern Illinois where she met Cuban emigre José Menendez. The couple married and had two sons: Erik and Lyle Menendez before moving to California. Kitty and her husband José were murdered by their own sons. Kitty was shot in the leg and several times in the arm, chest and face leaving her unrecognisable.

Nancy Lanza, mother of Sandy Hook Elementary School shooter Adam Lanza - Nancy Lanza was married to Adam’s father Peter until their divorce in 2009. Nancy suffered from health problems, having to visit New York for treatment for her MS. Nancy loved art, music and going to baseball games being an avid fan of the Boston Red Sox. On the morning of December 14th 2012 Nancy was asleep in her bed in her pajamas when her son Adam shot her in the face with a shotgun before driving to Sandy Hook Elementary School and killing 20 children and 6 more adults before committing suicide.

Clarnell Stage, mother of Co-Ed Killer Edmund Kemper - Edmund was Clarnell’s only son. Clarnell separated from her husband (and Edmund’s father) in 1957 wherein Edmund was moved to Montana to live with his mother permanently. Clarnell exhibited abusive behaviour to her son, forcing him to sleep in a locked basement, calling him “a real weirdo” to his face and refusing to coddle him because “it would turn him gay”. After a span of killings that took the lives of 9 others, Edmund bludgeoned his mother Clarnell to death in her sleep and cut her throat with a knife on April 20th, 1973. He then turned himself in to the police.

Arlene Holmes, mother of Aurora Theatre Shooter James Holmes - Arlene has spoken publicly since her son’s massacre in 2012. She is currently working to increase awareness of mental health issues stating: “The way that I want to honour [the victims’] injuries and their distress is to try and help prevent something this bad from happening again.” She has urged more importantly than anything else that those suffering from mental illness seek help immediately.

Zubeidat Tsarneva, mother of Boston Bombers Tamerlan Tsarnaev and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev -  Zubeidat has long protested her son’s innocence. She has remained unwavering in her support for him and stated in 2013 that America were “the real terrorists”.

Li-Chin Rodger, mother of Santa Barbara gunman Elliot Rodger - Li-Chin is a Malaysian Chinese emigre who met her husband Peter Rodger whilst working as a research assistant for a film company. They had two children: Elliot and Georgia. Li-Chin and her husband divorced in 1998 less than two years after they had moved to Los Angeles from England. Li-Chin saw her son’s youtube videos wherein he complained about the unfairness of females not noticing him. Because of their content the police were alerted, they interrogated Elliot but made no arrest or further investigation. Elliot murdered 6 people and injured 14 others before committing suicide.

Augusta Wilhelmine Gein, mother of Ed Gein - Augusta married George Phillip Gein but came to resent him later in life due to his alcoholism and inability to hold down a steady job. Augusta was a zealous Lutheran Christian, preaching to her son Ed frequently about hell and immorality whilst they lived together in complete isolation on a 155 acre farm they owned in Wisconsin. She would often choose the most graphic old testament verses of the Bible to read to young Ed. After Augusta had a stroke after her husband’s death she required constant care from Ed. She became enraged when Ed took her to visit a nearby farmer to buy straw and witnessed him living with a woman to whom he was not married. Augusta died of a second stroke on December 29th 1945 causing Ed Gein irrevocable devastation - he had lost his one friend and love in the entire world.

Marion Elaine Robinson, mother of John Wayne Gacy - Gacy was abused by his alcoholic father and sexually abused by other members of his family during his youth. He also suffered from a heart condition which Gacy’s father denied existed. Gacy however had a good relationship with his mother. She never doubted his illness and was sure to get him the help he needed. Additionally when he stole at a young age his mother publicly forced him to apologise and return the items. However this led to him gaining the reputation of being a ‘mama’s boy’ and a ‘sissy’. Marion remained in contact with her son even after his incarceration. She died in 1989, five years before her son’s execution in 1994.

Mercedes Ramirez, mother of Night Stalker Richard Ramirez - Mercedes Ramirez had five children with her husband Julian Ramirez. She was a Catholic Christian and raised Richard in the same faith. She and her husband emigrated to El Paso, Texas in the United States from Mexico. She worked in a factory wherein she was exposed to chemicals without a face mask during her pregnancies. Her carrying and birth of Richard was difficult but he was born a seemingly healthy baby boy. Mercedes was devastated by her son’s crimes, travelling to California to speak in court.

Well there you go, I wrote all this and made the image so don’t delete my caption or use it uncredited. We should all take a moment to remember how the atrocities committed by murderers destroy the lives of not only their victims but also all those around them.

“At 14.3 hands this horse is perfect for a small child or 4’ tall elf”
Me, a human adult, with a 14.0 hand horse: 👌