7

Drow-  In a race that has a traditional, set look, I really like to play with variance in skin tones, hues, hair colors and textures so as to highlight the genetic diversity that would be present.  I like to give assumed features like the generic elf ear unique shapes and tilt and unless two characters are related, I really try to push that distinction so that a race that can tend towards blandness feels broader, more interesting, and more realistic.

These are some characters from probably the best D&D game I’ve ever played.  The elfess with the facial scar is Lilith, and I played the guy with the big spider-shaped scar on his chest, Zyrus.  I wanted to play an underdog type character and rise up through the system, so I went with a very average looking male in training to become a wizard.  He was rude, blasphemous, ambitious and insensitive, and just a blast to play.  He got involved with Lilith, a priestess of Lolth and it went about as well as a heathen carrying on with the zealous acolyte of a murder-godess can go.

I’ve always loved Drow for some reason, so this game was right up my alley.  It was a lot of fun to design a world that is so different from traditional, pristine fantasy.  Thinking about how a matriarchal, evil society (and later a matriarchal good society) would realistically work was so so fun, and I still plan on doing some more art with actual armor at some point in the future, especially since Lilith was such a boss. 

The Trickle Chamber

Deep underground, our intrepid adventurers explore a network of caverns carved through bedrock by a long forgotten civilisation.
Upon entering one chamber, they see a large stone grid on the floor, roughly twenty feet by ten in size. There are two doors leading into this room: the one they entered through, and another leading out (sealed by a perfectly smooth stone slab).

Upon one square of the grid is a short stone pillar, one foot high. Affixed to the top of this is a shallow, carved stone basin, filled with an ethereal and intangible liquid which glows faintly in the darkness of the cavern. The basin has a hole in one side, and the liquid is trickling out, vanishing as it falls. The source is not depleted.
An adjacent square bears a similar (but empty) basin at ground level, with an inlet on one side which points in the opposite direction to the outlet of the raised basin. Neither basin can be lifted or rotated.

The other thirty squares of the grid are covered with stone tiles. Each of these has a strangely shaped carving: shallow channels which crisscross each tile.

If a character attempts to catch the mysterious liquid in their hands, it feels incredibly heavy but vanishes almost instantly on contact. It is immune to magical interaction.

Inspection of the tiles reveals that they are mounted on an ingenious gear system carved from marble. Each tile can be rotated through 360 degrees, given that all other tiles are currently aligned. They are quite heavy and require a strength score of 12 to move one. Each character can turn one tile per turn as an action.
As soon as a character rotates any of the tiles, a stone door falls into place, blocking the way back out. It is impenetrable and resistant to magic.

From this moment onwards, a swarm of 1d4 carnivorous bats enters the chamber every 30 seconds, through a small hole in the lofty stone ceiling.

Once a circuit of channels linking the raised basin to the lower one is completed, the glowing liquid flows along the path, draining from one bowl to the other. When the second bowl is filled, the weight of the magical liquid activates a hidden mechanism, raising the door which leads deeper into the caverns.

A Guide to Roleplaying Systems

Player: Can I do the thing?

Mutants and Masterminds: Yes you can do the thing.

GURPS: Fill out these forms in triplicate.

Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition: Yes, but it’s really not worth it unless you are a Dream Elf with the Godblooded feat and at least five levels in the Thingomancer Prestige class from Complete Thing. Or you could just play a Wizard, they get The Thing as a 3rd level spell.

Call of Cthulu: You can do the thing, but you REALLY don’t want to.

FATE: That depends, can you bullshit the GM into believing that one of your vaguely-worded aspects supports you doing The thing?

7th Sea: Only if the thing is properly dramatic!

Shadowrun: Yes, but you’ll need a bathtub full of D6s.

Paranoia: The thing is treason.

Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition:

[I copied the above from this brilliant post, and I reblogged as text because I really felt the need to add the gif for 5e, and chat posts don’t allow gifs, dammit.]

5

More D&D art.  This is my current solo game character, Kender, so there’ll probably be a lot more art to come from this one.

Kender is a sweet-heart.  He’s been through a lot of suffering but is still positive and makes the best out of life.  He thinks the world should be better than it is and whenever possible, he works to improve it.  To him everyone has value and he tries to treat each person he meets with kindness and compassion.  That doesn’t go all that well because he’s a Tiefling (and he has a bit of a temper), but he has no intention of giving up just because a few people treat him badly.  He has his share of bad days, but his mantra is that ‘tomorrow will be better’ and if tomorrow will be better, he can make it through today.

I like to play around with my D&D drawings and try different styles cause they’re pretty much just to entertain me.  Those horns have changed a ton since I first started drawing him, and boy do I get lazy drawing them sometimes.