54th massachusetts infantry

Why the TV show Timeless Deserves More Attention

Okay everyone listen up. This past year (meaning 2016 going into 2017), NBC seemed to have a good batch of new TV shows that have gained critical acclaim (This Is Us, I’m looking at you). But one that seemed to fly under the radar was the show Timeless. It was created by Eric Kripke, who is also known for creating the show of Supernatural which is on the CW, and Shawn Ryan.  

Now just a gist of what it’s about. It’s about a man who steals a time machine to go back into critical points of United States and early North American history to try and take out this organization called Rittenhouse, which seems to play a major role in basically every turning point of the historical timeline. The government takes over control of the industry who made the time machine and gets a trio of people to go back in time to stop the man. 

It seems that time machines and time travel seem to be an up and coming theme in media (Doctor Who reboot, Legends of Tomorrow to name two). But this one I found stood out in ways that deserve the recognition it’s due. 

Keep reading

Casualty List of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment from the Assault on Fort Wagner, South Carolina, 07/18/1863

The 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment was one of the most celebrated regiments of black soldiers that fought in the Civil War. Known simply as “the 54th,“ this regiment became famous after the heroic, but ill-fated, assault on Fort Wagner, South Carolina in July, 1863 (dramatized in the film Glory). Leading the direct assault under heavy fire, the 54th suffered enormous casualties before being forced to withdraw.

The courage and sacrifice of the 54th helped to dispel doubt within the Union Army about the fighting ability of black soldiers and earned this regiment undying battlefield glory. Shown here is one of the 54th’s casualty lists with the names of 116 enlisted men who died at Fort Wagner. Of the 600 men that charged Fort Wagner, 272 were killed, wounded, or captured.

Hand-colored tintype portrait of Union soldier Abraham F. Brown who served with Company E of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the Civil War.

4

Scenes From “Glory” (1989)

Robert Gould Shaw leads the US Civil War’s first all-black volunteer company, fighting prejudices of both his own Union army and the Confederates.

More than two years after the Civil War commenced at Fort Sumter, the guns thundered once again across Charleston Harbor. On July 18, 1863, the first regiment of African-American soldiers officially recognized by the U.S. Army led a bloody assault against Fort Wagner. The valor displayed by the 54th Massachusetts Voluntary Infantry Regiment that day inspired the 1989 movie “Glory” and changed the way the Union viewed black soldiers.

The closing narration reveals that Fort Wagner was never taken by Union forces. The sacrifice of the 54th, which lost nearly half its men in the battle, was not in vain; their bravery resulted in the Union accepting thousands of black men for combat which President Abraham Lincoln credited with turning the tide of the war.

Okay Robert Gould Shaw was so cute

He was such a babe

He was born to abolitionists and was famous for leading the all-black 54th Massachusetts volunteer infantry unit, and was known for running into his last battle yelling “Forward, Fifty-Fourth, forward!”

The poor guy got shot and was killed in that battle, which took place only 2 months after he married :(

Edward “Ned” Needles Hallowell: A Name Forgotten To History

He was an officer that commanded the all black 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry following the death of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw at the Second Battle of Fort Wagner in 1863. (of the Movie “Glory” Fame).  Legacy: The character of Major Forbes in the film Glory is based somewhat on Edward Hallowell.

He was a Quaker from Philadelphia who’s father was an abolitionist.  Lt. Edward Hallowell accepted an appointment in the 54th Massachusetts, which was to be led by Robert Gould Shaw as colonel and his brother Norwood as Lieutenant Colonel. The regiment was to be made up of white and black abolitionists fighting together for black freedom. Edward recruited African-American soldiers in Philadelphia and was actually the first officer to occupy the barracks set aside for the 54th at Camp Meigs in Reedville. Recruiting for the regiment proved so successful that a second regiment, the 55th, was formed. Norwood Hallowell was designated as the 55th’s colonel and Edward was promoted to major and was second-in-command to Shaw.

By the time of the famous assault by the 54th on Fort Wagner Hallowell was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. In the assault on Fort Wagner he commanded the left wing with half the regiment’s companies. Because of the narrow defile through which the 54th had to pass the left wing was deployed directly behind Shaw and the right wing. Hallowell suffered three wounds in the assault and went home to recuperate. Upon returning he commanded the 54th as a full colonel for the rest of the war, except when he was in temporary command of a brigade. The 54th and Hallowell continued to serve with distinction during the war. He fought at the Battle of Olustee, the Battle of Honey Hill and the Battle of Boykin’s Mill. At Boykin’s Mill, Hallowell was in command of Major General Potter’s 3rd Brigade.

He was mustered out of the Union Army volunteer service in 1865. Hallowell marched with the Massachusetts members of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment at a post-war victory review held in Boston in December 1865. After the war Edward returned to Medford and became a wool commission merchant. His wounds from the war undoubtedly cut his life short and he died in 1871. He is buried with his wife Charlotte at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge.

Little lasting recognition of either Edward or his brother Norwood exists. One exception is at the famous Union Club off of Boston Common which has meeting rooms dedicated to Edward and Norwood as well as Robert Gould Shaw.

Plan and Sections of Fort Wagner, 1863

An ill-fated assault was launched on the Confederate stronghold of Fort Wagner, South Carolina on July 18th, 1863.  Leading the attack was the 54th Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, one of the first official African American units.  The 54th lost two-thirds of their officers and half of their troops in the assault, memorably dramatized in the film Glory

5

Happy ‪#‎AskAnArchivist‬ Day!

We have five staff members from across the National Archives answering your archives questions. Tweet us your questions–our experts will be standing by at 11 am ET  on Twitter at @usnatarchives!

@NARAMediaLabs

Audrey Amidon and Criss Kovac
Audrey and Criss work in the Motion Picture Preservation Lab, where they and their colleagues perform conservation and preservation work on motion picture records held across the National Archives. They write about their work and their favorite film finds on The Unwritten Record. Audrey studied film archives at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England and previously worked at the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum. Criss studied film preservation at the L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation and has been supervisor of the Motion Picture Lab since 2005.


@DocsTeach

Stephanie Greenhut

Stephanie Greenhut runs DocsTeach.org, the online tool for teaching with documents from the National Archives, and shares teaching resources via National Archives Education on Facebook and the Education Updates blog. She focuses on education technology, incorporating primary sources into websites, apps, eBooks, and other online learning resources. She is a former classroom teacher.


@CongressArchive

Natalie Rocchio
Natalie specializes in digital outreach for the Center for Legislative Archives. She creates content, manages, and maintains the Center’s twitter and tumblr accounts, as well as the Center’s portion of archives.gov. She has a Master’s degree in History with concentrations in American History and Public History from American University.


@archivespres (Preservation Programs)

Nancy Stanfill
Nancy is a Preservation Technician at the St. Louis Preservation Program. She co-chairs the Preservation Programs Social Media accounts, which includes highlights from the Persons of Exceptional Prominence (PEP) records and updates on breakthroughs in filming and scanning severely burned records. She has a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science with a Certificate in Conservation from the University of Texas at Austin, where she was a member of the first class to begin the program in 1993.


@boston_archives

Joseph P. Keefe

Joe is an Archives Specialist and Reference Team Lead and Social Media co-coordinator with the National Archives at Boston. He began his National Archives career in the Federal Records Center where he worked in both research and the Transfer of records into the facility. He moved to his current position as an Archives Specialist in 2006. Joe has a bachelor’s degree in History from Framingham State University in Framingham, Massachusetts and a MA in American History from the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

He has lectured on numerous subjects in New England including genealogical research, Census, Naturalization and Passenger Lists and 18th 19th and 20th Century Military records, 54th Massachusetts Infantry and National Archives records related to World War II.

Lieutenant Colonel Warren Adams of Co. H, 1st South Carolina Infantry Regiment In Uniform

Lt. Colonel Warren Adams commanded of the 1st South Carolina Infantry Regiment in defense of Battery Wagner at Charleston. He fended off the attacks of the African American 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. Attacked twice on July 11 and July 18, 1863, he repelled the Union forces with modest losses. Colonel Robert Gould Shaw was killed in the second assault on the fort. It eventually succumbed to siege when the Confederates abandoned it on the evening of September 6-7, 1863. The Battles of Battery Wagner are the source of the 1989 movie Glory. Adams went on to serve the 2nd South Carolina Cavalry and was shot from his saddle at the Battle of Bentonville in 1865.- He was the son of South Carolina Governor James Hopkins Adams and Jane Margaret Scott Adams.

  • Purchased from: Cowan’s Auctions, Cincinnati, Ohio, June 2015.
  • Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress).