50th anniversary audio

The Beatles - “Love You To” - Revolver

Recorded: 11 & 13 April 1966, EMI Studios, Abbey Road

Written by: George Harrison

Musicians:
George Harrison: vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, sitar
Paul McCartney: backing vocals, bass
Ringo Starr: tambourine
Anil Bhagwat: tabla
Other Asian Music Circle musicians: tamboura

Love You To was one of the first tunes I wrote for sitar. Norwegian Wood was an accident as far as the sitar part was concerned but this was the first song where I consciously tried to use the sitar and tabla on the basic track: I over-dubbed the guitars and vocal later.“ - George Harrison, I Me Mine

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"I wrote ‘Love You To’ on the sitar, because the sitar sounded so nice and my interest was getting deeper all the time. I wanted to write a tune that was specifically for the sitar. Also it had a tabla part, and that was the first time we used a tabla player.” - George Harrison, The Beatles Anthology

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“The session came out of the blue. A chap called Angadi called me and asked if I was free that evening to work with George. I didn’t know who he meant - he didn’t say it was Harrison. It was only when a Rolls-Royce came to pick me up that I realised I’d be playing on a Beatles session. When I arrived at Abbey Road there were girls everywhere with Thermos flasks, cakes, sandwiches, waiting for The Beatles to come out.

George told me what he wanted and I tuned the tabla with him. He suggested I play something in the Ravi Shankar style, 16 beats, though he agreed that I should improvise. Indian music is all improvisation. I was very lucky, they put my name on the record sleeve. I’m really proud of that, they were the greatest ever and my name is on the sleeve. It was one of the most exciting times of my life.” - Anil Bhagwat, The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions by Mark Lewisohn

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Courtesy of YouTube (user Ocsor6), George and Ringo’s letter to the BBC radio program, broadcast 50 years ago today, on 12 January 1964.
Along with the actual message, bloopers are included in the video as well. :)

George and Ringo’s message:

[Read out by George] Dear Public Ear,

We heard your programme on December the 29th when Tony Hall said it’d be nice if the people who liked our kind of music would also appreciate the kind of records and music that we play at home - like Mary Wells, [the] Miracles and not to mention Marvin Gaye.

[Ringo interjects] Marvin Gaye?

Told you not to mention Marvin Gaye.

We believe the fans would like these singers if they had the chance to hear them, y'see. Because we don’t seem to hear enough of them these days on the radio.

So you’d make us very happy, Tony, and you’d [Ringo joins in] absolutely break us up, if you’d play us some.

Your sincerely,

George Harrison and Ringo Starr

A band

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Courtesy of YouTube (user: Lord Basil), George Harrison being interviewed on Ready, Steady, Go!, 20 March 1964.

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These are the first six eighth doctor stories I’ve listen to. Really it’s five stories but the behind the scenes discs on Limited Collector’s Edition of “The Light at the End” is well worth it’s money. I recommend all the above stories. My favorites are “The Stones of Venice” and “Minuet in Hell”. I loved “An Earthly Child” for the reunion of the doctor and his granddaughter Susan. I suggest listening to “Storm Warning” for introduction of Charley Pollard as eighth doctor’s first companion in the audio adventures. Please support Big Finish they make great Doctor Who audio stories!

A Hard Day’s Night, The Beatles’ third album (and the only one to feature solely Lennon-McCartney compositions), released 50 years ago today on 10 July 1964. Image courtesy of thebeatles.com.

You can also listen to the full album - whether you own it on vinyl, CD or digitally - online via YouTube (user: zZzTheBeatleszZz) here.

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Courtesy of YouTube (user: Beatroom7D), The Beatles - with Jimmie Nichol, Ringo’s stand-in, on drums - on VARA-TV, Treslong, Hillegom, Netherlands, with “Roll Over Beethoven”, one of several songs and an interview recorded 50 years ago today, on 5 June 1964.

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Courtesy of YouTube (user: SailAwayRaymond7): The Beatles in Sweden, 50 years ago today, 29 July 1964. John Lennon reading a boy of “Good Dog Nigel” from In His Own Write - with a little help from “George Parasol,” “Ringo Stone,” and “Paul McCharmly.”