500 years away

The Dark River to Antares : Connecting the Pipe Nebula to the colorful region near bright star Antares is a dark cloud dubbed the Dark River, flowing from the pictures left edge. Murky looking, the Dark Rivers appearance is caused by dust obscuring background starlight, although the dark nebula contains mostly hydrogen and molecular gas. Surrounded by dust, Antares, a red supergiant star, creates an unusual bright yellowish reflection nebula. Above it, bright blue double star Rho Ophiuchi is embedded in one of the more typical bluish reflection nebulae, while red emission nebulae are also scattered around the region. Globular star cluster M4 is just seen above and right of Antares, though it lies far behind the colorful clouds, at a distance of some 7,000 light-years. The Dark River itself is about 500 light years away. The colorful skyscape is a mosaic of telescopic images spanning nearly 10 degrees . via NASA

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Frank: Percy, could you please inform Leo Valdez that he is being shunned?

Percy: Leo, Frank says welcome back and he could use a hug.

Frank: Okay, tell him that that’s not true.

Percy: Frank says that he actually doesn’t know one single fact about archery.

Frank: Okay, no, Percy, tell him the very first compound bow was made 500 years ago. [Leo walks away] Percy! Tell him!

Percy: Leo… nah, that’s too far.

Frank: Damn you.

  • me: i would sacrifice my first born to have EXO hip thrust in my general direction
  • also me: *looking at EXO'rdium US ticket prices* why are they asking so much from me

This craggy fantasy mountaintop enshrouded by wispy clouds looks like a bizarre landscape from Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” or a Dr. Seuss book, depending on your imagination. The NASA Hubble Space Telescope image, which is even more dramatic than fiction, captures the chaotic activity atop a three-light-year-tall pillar of gas and dust that is being eaten away by the brilliant light from nearby bright stars. The pillar is also being assaulted from within, as infant stars buried inside it fire off jets of gas that can be seen streaming from towering peaks.

This turbulent cosmic pinnacle lies within a tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula, located 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina. The image celebrated the 20th anniversary of Hubble’s launch and deployment into an orbit around Earth.

Scorching radiation and fast winds (streams of charged particles) from super-hot newborn stars in the nebula are shaping and compressing the pillar, causing new stars to form within it. Streamers of hot ionized gas can be seen flowing off the ridges of the structure, and wispy veils of gas and dust, illuminated by starlight, float around its towering peaks. The denser parts of the pillar are resisting being eroded by radiation much like a towering butte in Utah’s Monument Valley withstands erosion by water and wind.

Nestled inside this dense mountain are fledgling stars. Long streamers of gas can be seen shooting in opposite directions off the pedestal at the top of the image. Another pair of jets is visible at another peak near the center of the image. These jets (known as HH 901 and HH 902, respectively) are the signpost for new star birth. The jets are launched by swirling disks around the young stars, which allow material to slowly accrete onto the stars’ surfaces.

Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 observed the pillar on Feb. 1-2, 2010. The colors in this composite image correspond to the glow of oxygen (blue), hydrogen and nitrogen (green), and sulfur (red).

Object Names: HH 901, HH 902

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, and M. Livio and the Hubble 20th Anniversary Team (STScI)

Time And Space

Undersea corral? Enchanted castles? Space serpents? These eerie, dark pillar-like structures are actually columns of cool interstellar hydrogen gas and dust that are also incubators for new stars. The pillars protrude from the interior wall of a dark molecular cloud like stalagmites from the floor of a cavern. They are part of the “Eagle Nebula” (also called M16 — the 16th object in Charles Messier’s 18th century catalog of “fuzzy” objects that aren’t comets), a nearby star-forming region 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Serpens.

The pillars are in some ways akin to buttes in the desert, where basalt and other dense rock have protected a region from erosion, while the surrounding landscape has been worn away over millennia. In this celestial case, it is especially dense clouds of molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that have survived longer than their surroundings in the face of a flood of ultraviolet light from hot, massive newborn stars (off the top edge of the picture). This process is called “photoevaporation. "This ultraviolet light is also responsible for illuminating the convoluted surfaces of the columns and the ghostly streamers of gas boiling away from their surfaces, producing the dramatic visual effects that highlight the three-dimensional nature of the clouds. The tallest pillar (left) is about about 4 light-years long from base to tip.

As the pillars themselves are slowly eroded away by the ultraviolet light, small globules of even denser gas buried within the pillars are uncovered. These globules have been dubbed "EGGs.” EGGs is an acronym for “Evaporating Gaseous Globules,” but it is also a word that describes what these objects are. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars — stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually, the stars themselves emerge from the EGGs as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation.

The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly- ionized oxygen atoms.

Object Names: M16, Eagle Nebula, NGC 6611

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, STScI, J. Hester and P. Scowen (Arizona State University)

Time And Space

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

A stellar nursery in the Carina Nebula. A billowing cloud of cold interstellar gas and dust rising from a tempestuous stellar nursery located 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina. This pillar of dust and gas serves as an incubator for new stars and is teeming with new star-forming activity. Hot, young stars erode and sculpt the clouds into this fantasy landscape by sending out thick stellar winds and scorching ultraviolet radiation. The low-density regions of the nebula are shredded while the denser parts resist erosion and remain as thick pillars. In the dark, cold interiors of these columns new stars continue to form.

Kepler-186f ~ The first known Earth-size planet to lie within the habitable zone of a star beyond the Sun. Discovered using data from the prolific planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft, the distant world orbits its parent star, a cool, dim, M dwarf star about half the size and mass of the Sun, some 500 light-years away from us, in the constellation Cygnus. While the size and orbit of Kepler-186f are known, its mass and composition are not, and can’t be determined by Kepler’s transit technique. (NASA)

Stars and Dust in Corona Australis: Cosmic dust clouds and young, energetic stars inhabit this telescopic vista, less than 500 light-years away toward the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. The dust clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in the Milky Way. But the striking complex of reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, and IC 4812 produce a characteristic blue color as light from the regions young hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The dust also obscures from view stars still in the process of formation. At the left, smaller yellowish nebula NGC 6729 bends around young variable star R Coronae Australis. Just below it, glowing arcs and loops shocked by outflows from embedded newborn stars are identified as Herbig-Haro objects. On the sky this field of view spans about 1 degree. That corresponds to almost 9 light-years at the estimated distance of the nearby star forming region. via NASA

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Galaxies for the Signs

Aries:  Andromeda Galaxy

The Milky Way and Andromeda are expected to collide in 3.75 billion years. The apparent magnitude of the Andromeda Galaxy, at 3.4, is one of the brightest of any of the Messier objects

Taurus: Pinwheel Galaxy

Is a face-on spiral galaxy distanced 21 million light-years away. Contains an ultra-luminous X-ray source - a source more powerful than any single star but less powerful than a whole galaxy

Gemini: Mayall’s Object

Is likely to be not one galaxy, but two galaxies undergoing a collision. It is also   located 500 million light years away

Cancer: Bode’s Galaxy

Is a spiral galaxy about 12 million light-years away. The active galactic nucleus  harbors a  super-massive black hole.

Leo: Cigar Galaxy

Is a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away. It is about five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way

Virgo: Sombrero Galaxy

This Galaxy is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo (Main reason why I picked this one) located 28 million light-years from Earth. It is known for it’s very bright center.

Libra: Tadpole Galaxy

Its most dramatic features are a trail of stars about 280,000 light-years long and massive, bright blue star clusters. Which is said to be caused by another galaxy almost hitting Tadpole.

Scorpio: Black Eye Galaxy

It has a spectacular dark band of absorbing dust in front of the galaxy’s bright nucleus, giving rise to its nicknames of the “Black Eye” or “Evil Eye” galaxy. Not much is known about this galaxy also.

Sagittarius: Cosmos Redshift 7

Known  to contain some of the earliest first stars that produced the chemical elements needed for the later formation of planets and life as it is known

Capricorn: Whirlpool Galaxy

It was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral galaxy, and has a current high rate of star formation. A black hole, surrounded by a ring of dust, is thought to exist at the heart of the spiral.

Aquarius: Hoag’s Object

A nearly perfect ring of young hot blue stars circles the older yellow nucleus of this ring galaxy 600 million light-years away. Many of the details of the galaxy remain a mystery, foremost of which is how it formed. It is also very rare type of galaxy.

Pisces: Cartwheel Galaxy

Is a lenticular galaxy and ring galaxy about 500 million light-years away. “one of the most complicated structures awaiting its explanation on the basis of stellar dynamics.” - Zwicky

(NASA)  Molecular Cloud Barnard 68
Image Credit: FORS Team, 8.2-meter VLT Antu, ESO

Where did all the stars go? What used to be considered a hole in the sky is now known to astronomers as a dark molecular cloud. Here, a high concentration of dust and molecular gas absorb practically all the visible light emitted from background stars. The eerily dark surroundings help make the interiors of molecular clouds some of the coldest and most isolated places in the universe. One of the most notable of these dark absorption nebulae is a cloud toward the constellation Ophiuchus known as Barnard 68, pictured above. That no stars are visible in the center indicates that Barnard 68 is relatively nearby, with measurements placing it about 500 light-years away and half a light-year across. It is not known exactly how molecular clouds like Barnard 68 form, but it is known that these clouds are themselves likely places for new stars to form. In fact, Barnard 68 itself has been found likely to collapse and form a new star system. It is possible to look right through the cloud in infrared light.

Original imagine: Imagine being Klaus’s lover and Elijah’s best friend, but losing them for 500 years.

Author: Krystal

Reader Gender: Female

Word Count1789

The door opens with a large bang and a girl, with silky black hair swinging down to her hips and aqua blue eyes, struts in. Clothes soaked from the storm cracking outside she wipes the rain droplets off her pale face. ‘Mystic Grill’, as they call it, is relatively full for such a depressing day. Luna licks her lips, anticipating tonight’s feast. However the first thing she catches eye on is the bar and the wonderful stacks of Whiskey in the cabinets. Her long legs in tight black jeans stalk over to the bar, passing people who gape at her beauty. Ignoring the men drooling and the girls envy stares she walks up to the bar and sits down, she pulls off her leather jacket slowly, noticing the bartender grinning at her.
“Whiskey on the rocks please” she winks sexily. He nods and reaches to pour the drink.  Swivelling on the stool she begins to poke her nose into peoples conversations.
“Come on baby lets go home…”

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anonymous asked:

Why do you find diversity to be essential for urban environment, senpai?

Because in a place where the population is homogeneous there is nothing to learn from each other, there are no different points of view to consider and no challenging of the “norm”. The big advancements of civilization have never happened when one group is isolated from the rest, think how even today there are tribes following the same customs and rituals of hundreds of years ago. 

I truly think we are more similar than different across the world, regardless of where you come from. That is the only reason I can find beauty in a piece of art created half a world away 500 years apart or can read a book originally written in Russian and find myself engaged with the characters.

By the same token, there is power to be gained by reinforcing the differences and those that seek power know that far too well. It makes me sick to my stomach when I listen to some of them talk.

In NYC, here in DC and when I travel I have had the chance to speak with people from all around this world, and I can honestly say, I have learned something from every one of them. There is a reason why some cities seem to have the best of everything, and it is because they have a very diverse population.

Life is richer when you surround yourself with people from different backgrounds, anyone that tells you otherwise is wrong. That was the one thing I wanted to do when I started this blog, feature works of art and architecture from everywhere in the world (that is why the atlas is in the name).

Originally posted by vhspositive

Cosmic dust clouds and young, energetic stars inhabit this telescopic vista, less than 500 light-years away toward the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. The dust clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in the Milky Way. But the striking complex of reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, and IC 4812 produce a characteristic blue color as light from the region’s young hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The dust also obscures from view stars still in the process of formation. At the left, smaller yellowish nebula NGC 6729 bends around young variable star R Coronae Australis. Just below it, glowing arcs and loops shocked by outflows from embedded newborn stars are identified as Herbig-Haro objects. On the sky this field of view spans about 1 degree. That corresponds to almost 9 light-years at the estimated distance of the nearby star forming region.

Image Credit & Copyright: CHART32 Team, Processing - Johannes Schedler