4th recruit training battalion

Sgt. Candice Puente, a drill instructor for Platoon 4011, Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, looks over her recruits’ marksmanship data book on the rifle range Feb. 25, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits use marksmanship data books to keep track of their progress and to adjust their techniques accordingly. Rifle qualification is one of eight requirements recruits must fulfill to become Marines. Puente is a 26-year-old native of El Paso, Texas. Oscar Company is scheduled to graduate April 4, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple)

Rct. Kathryngra Plata, Platoon 4010, Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, shouts during an incentive training session Jan. 17, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Incentive training develops discipline and motivation through physical exercises in a controlled environment. Plata, a 20-year-old native of Arlington, Va., is scheduled to graduate April 4, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple)

Drill Instructor Spotlight

Only about 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. This handful of dedicated DIs is entrusted with sustaining a more than 238-year legacy by transforming men and women into the next generation of Marines. This is one of those drill instructors.

Name: Sgt. Jamie Murray
Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion
Joined Marine Corps in December 2007
Became a DI in June 2013
Military Occupational Specialty: C-130 Electrician
Hometown: Mt. Clemens, Mich.

“I became a drill instructor because I want to better the Marine Corps like everybody else, but I want to change these girls’ lives - to take them from where they may not have felt worth anything where they came from and make them part of the family that we are. They want to do better for the country, and I want to make them better to be better for the country. To make us stronger as a nation through the Marine Corps and instill some type of discipline and pride into these girls so they become proactive women in society.”

Drill Instructor Spotlight

PARRIS ISLAND, S.C. – Only about 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. This handful of dedicated DIs is entrusted with sustaining a more than 238-year legacy by transforming men and women into the next generation of Marines. This is one of those drill instructors.

Name: Sgt. Daniela Sosa
Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion
Joined Marine Corps in April 2006
Became a DI in September 2013
Military Occupational Specialty: Avionics Technician
Hometown: Santa Ana, Calif.

“I want to have something to do with making not only female Marines but good ones. It’s the quality over the quantity that counts.”

(Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple)

Recruits of Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, run, crunch and shout throughout an incentive training session Feb. 4, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Incentive training consists of physical exercises administered in a controlled and deliberate manner and is used to correct minor disciplinary infractions. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors must instill in recruits. Papa Company is scheduled to graduate April 25, 2014. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

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The recruits of November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, replaced their soft caps with Kevlar helmets when they ventured to the island’s field training area for lessons in common field and combat skills April 29-May 3, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. One of the week’s main events required recruits to maneuver in teams of four through an obstacle-filled course that challenged their teamwork and tactical skills. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training week, a time when recruits learn the rudimentary combat and field skills all Marines must know. These skills are broadened during training at Camp Lejeune, N.C., if the recruits graduate May 23, 2014. (Photos by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Sgt. Dana Lucio, senior drill instructor of Platoon 4043, Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, leads her platoon during graduation ceremony’s pass in review Dec. 20, 2013, on Parris Island. The review is a military courtesy which allows those in the reviewing stands to gaze at the passing units. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Rct. Christy Franco, 27, guide of Platoon 4017, Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, awaits commands from her senior drill instructor during her platoon’s final drill evaluation May 15, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The guide is the formation’s base in close-order drill. Franco is scheduled to graduate May 24, 2013, and is a native of Palmdale, Calif. (Photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)