45th floor

They got the definition wrong.

It has been said that the definition of insanity is “doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results”. I understand the sentiment behind the saying, but it’s wrong.

I entered the building on a bet. I was strapped for cash and didn’t buy into the old legends of the hotel to begin with, so fifty bucks was more than enough to get me do it. It was simple. Just reach the top floor, the 45th floor, shine my flashlight from a window.

The hotel was old and broken, including the elevator, so that meant hiking up the stairs. So up the stairs I went. As I reached each platform, I noted the old brass plaques displaying the floor numbers. 15, 16, 17, 18. I felt a little tired as I crept higher, but so far, no ghosts, no cannibals, no demons. Piece of cake.

I can’t tell you how happy I was as I entered that last stretch of numbers. I joyfully counted them aloud at each platform. 40,41,42,43, 44, 44. I stopped and looked back down the stairs. I must have miscounted, so I continued up. 44. One more flight. 44. And then down ten flights. 44. Fifteen flights. 44.

And so it’s been for as long as I can remember. So really, insanity isn’t doing something repeatedly and expecting different results. It’s knowing that the results will never ever change; that each door leads to the same staircase, to the same number. It’s realizing you no longer fall asleep. It’s not knowing whether you’ve been running for days or weeks or years. It’s when the sobbing slowly turns into laughter.

Day 12: Last day and flight home

Well it’s been great. Last day today which meant we had to organise a couple of things first up such as packing, checking out, buying bus tickets to the airport, and booking a pick-up for when we arrive in Sydney. All done. So now to set off for our last day of sight-seeing.

Firstly, we tried to find a shop (recommended) that sold yukatas (Japanese-style bath robes). No luck. So noodle soup with tofu for breakfast in a small and local-looking cafe.

We then bought a metro day pass and went to Shinjuku to see the view from the 45th floor of the Government Metropolitan Building. Great view. We could see Mt Fuji which has given us the inspiration to go and climb it on the same trip when we walk from Kyoto to Tokyo!!! :)

We then walked to a department store called Isetan but it was closed.

So making the most of our metro pass, we decided to head to Kagurazaka which is meant to have a quaint small town feel to it. And it did. Narrow streets, old paved walkways, a mixture of old and cool shops. It was a good choice of places to visit for a couple of hours. Before long, it was time to head back as our bus was leaving at 5:30pm.

So now here we are at the airport waiting for our flight. It’s always bitter/sweet ending a holiday. It’s lovely to get home to carry on with the familiarity of routine but it lacks the excitement of discovery which is what holidays are all about.

I’ll have another champagne to think about this a little more … :)

Sino-Korean Numbers and How to Use Them

There are two ways to express numbers in Korean and it can be confusing for a beginner. Sino-Korean numbers and Native Korean numbers:

Sino-Korean Numbers

영/공 - 0                     육 - 6

일 - 1                         칠 - 7

이 - 2                         팔 - 8

삼 - 3                        구 - 9

사 - 4                        십 - 10

오 - 5                        십일 - 11

Note: After 10, 11-19 are 10+ one of the numbers from 1 to 9

e.g. 십팔 is eighteen.


Sino-Korean numbers are used for phone numbers, bus route numbers, height, weight, years, months, minutes, seconds, address numbers, and prices:

Examples:

사십오 층 = The 45th floor(of a building)

저는 177 (백칠십칠) 센티미터예요. = I’m 177cm tall

그것 2천 300 (이천 삼백) 원 = That’s 2,300 won


Phone numbers: There are two different ways of reading telephone numbers in Korean.

Note: In this case,  의 is pronounced like 에 and  공 is generally used for phone numbers in Korean.

E.g. 001-8890-4335 = 공공일 팔팔구공의 사삼삼오

or

E.g. 001-8890-4335 =  공공일 팔천팔백구십 국의 사천삼백삼십오

Numbers in the tens (like 20, 30, 40, 50, etc) are made by taking the ones and putting them in front of the tens.

E.g. 이십 - 20, 삼십 - 30, 사십 - 40, etc

백  - 100                만 - 10,000
천  - 1,000             십만  - 100,000
                             백만  - 1,000,000

Note: Numbers 16, 26, 36, all the way up to 96 are pronounced as 심뉵, 이심뉵, 삼심뉵, 사심뉵, ……. 구심뉵 

Note: For some odd and confusing reason, Korean numbers are read in units of ten thousand rather than thousands so a number like 457,980 in Korean would be read as 45,7980 AKA 45만 7980(사십오만 칠천구백팔십) …..fun


Note: Numbers that are larger than 1 that begin with 1 aren’t pronounced:

E.g. 114 = 백십사  11,345 = 만 천삼백사십오


So making numbers in Korean is somewhat similar to making numbers in Chinese(I’m only familiar with Mandarin but I assume it’s the same) and Japanese.

E.g. 38 = three + ten + eight = 삼십팔

400 = four + hundred = 사백

3,490 = three + thousand + four + hundred + nine + ten = 삼천사백구십

The list goes on….

Use of Native Korean Numbers coming soon.

Personally, I still mess up from time to time when it comes to saying numbers out loud but it takes practice.

They got the definition wrong

credit to- Lloiu

It has been said that the definition of insanity is “doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results”. I understand the sentiment behind the saying, but it’s wrong.


I entered the building on a bet. I was strapped for cash and didn’t buy into the old legends of the hotel to begin with, so fifty bucks was more than enough to get me do it. It was simple. Just reach the top floor, the 45th floor, shine my flashlight from a window.

Keep reading

MBTI as MORE things that are great

ENTJ: The feeling you get when you leave the house dressed to kill and looking better than ever

INTJ: When someone admits you were right. Bonus: when people brag on your behalf about how clever you are and you just get to stand there and act humble while soaking it in

ISFP: When someone compliments your music taste and asks who the artist is

ESFJ: Seeing your waiter walks toward your table with your food on a huge tray

ESTP: Not being able to finish a joke because you’re laughing so hard

ESTJ: Reaching into your pocket and finding the $20 you forgot about

ISTJ: All white linens, hardwood floors, and floor-to-ceiling windows on the 45th floor

ISTP: Waking up before your alarm and then realizing you still have hours to sleep

ENFP: That feeling you get in July when you’re watching the sun reflect off of the bright blue bottom of a swimming pool and you know you have zero responsibilities and not a care in the world

ISFJ: When your pet falls asleep in your lap and it’s not uncomfortable and you can just let them rest

ENTP: Not being able to sleep the night before a big trip or event because you’re so excited

INFJ: When someone asks you about something you love and you get to explain it to them in great detail and they listen carefully the whole time

ENFJ: When you have plans all week doing different things with different people each time

ESFP: Doing something perfectly on the first try and everyone around you is mega impressed

INFP: The feeling you get when you’re on a long car trip and it’s raining and you’re not driving, you’re wearing a blanket in the passenger’s seat and watching the drops on the window

INTP: Finally getting home after a long day, changing into sweatpants, microwaving a hotpocket, and throwing yourself on your bed with your laptop because tomorrow is Saturday anyway