45 cents

THE SIGNS AS PUNS
  • Aries: Shout out to the people that don’t know what the opposite of in is!
  • Taurus: I had a crazy dream last night. I was swimming in an ocean of orange soda. Turns out it was just a Fanta sea...
  • Gemini: My sister bet that I couldn’t build a car out of spaghetti. You should’ve seen her face when I drove pasta..
  • Cancer: I used to hate maths but then I realized decimals have a point.
  • Leo: I’m close friends with 25 letters of the alphabet, I don’t know y...
  • Virgo: I don’t trust stairs because they’re always up to something...
  • Libra: What kind of concert only costs 45 cents? A 50 Cent concert featuring Nickelback.
  • Scorpio: Had an argument with my friend 5 years after i super glued his phone to his hand, he just couldn’t let it go...
  • Sagittarius: I want to be cremated as it is my last hope for a smoking hot body.
  • Capricorn: What do you do when you are cold? Stay in the corner, it’s about 90 degrees there.
  • Aquarius: Did you hear about the restaurant on the moon? I heard the food was good, but it had no atmosphere.
  • Pisces: Rick Astley will let you borrow any of his Pixar collection DVDs but he will never give you Up.
  • -
  • *CREDS TO THE BLOG JUST-BAD-PUNS FOR THESE AMAZE PUNS*

MY DATE WITH THE McCARTNEYS

Do you know how to work the washing machine, Sir Paul? Can I have a discount, Stella? Will you adopt me, Mary? Deborah Ross meets Macca and his girls to celebrate Linda’s legacy – and leaves wishing she could be one of the family

MAY 6, 2017 (Robert Wilson/The Times).- So, off to meet Stella McCartney (fashion designer), Mary McCartney (photographer and food writer) and their father, Sir Paul McCartney, who was once in some band or other, back in the day. (It may come to me.) I had previously been asked: did I wish to meet Stella and Mary and also Sir Paul, who was in some band or other, back in the day? I said, “Yes,” and, “You bet,” and, “Is Stella generous with discount cards if you suck up enough?”
So I was committed, prior to realising the proposed encounter had “poisoned” and “chalice” written all over it, as it would be strictly about the 25th anniversary of the Linda McCartney frozen food range, and Linda’s legacy in this regard, with any other subject being verboten. Also, it would be brief. (Forty-two minutes, as it turns out.) But I was determined to look on the bright side, as in: is Stella generous with discount cards if you suck up really, really quickly?

Armed with “Talking Points for Deborah Ross”, as helpfully provided by the PR people involved – “Paul, Stella and Mary continue to be heavily involved in the day-to-day activity of the brand …” – I make my way to the appointed venue, a house in Soho in London that belongs, I believe, to a friend of Mary’s. It is wonderfully stylish inside, all mid-century modern, but it is tiny, and when I arrive there is barely space to take a breath. The photographer and the photographer’s assistants are still knocking about. The Linda McCartney Foods PR is here, as is Paul’s press person. There are various factotums doing this and that and putting a lunch together. I ascend the stairs – out of the way, top-flight journalist with Talking Points coming through! – to find Paul on the top landing. He isn’t doing that thumbs-up thing – he is sometimes known as Paul “thumbs aloft” McCartney – but does have open arms and is saying, “Hello, Deborah,” which is nice, and superfriendly, and does makes me wish that, in return, I could think of that band. (It may yet come to me. Do you know it?)
They are a striking-looking family. Mary, 47, is darkly pretty. Stella, 45, is 82 per cent eyes. (And also pretty. I’m not playing favourites here.) Meanwhile, Paul, 74, has brown hair and looks fresh as a daisy in a crisp, white shirt and a deep navy suit, both by Stella McCartney. “It’s my new menswear,” says Stella. “He’s my male model.” They are all wearing Stella McCartney because, as Paul says, “We had our instructions.” I say to Stella that I apologise in advance should I happen to call her “Stelvis”, because I’ve a niece called Stella, who has always been known as “Stelvis”. “Why?” she asks. I don’t know. It’s a bit funny, I suppose. “Right.” Sometimes she’s also known as “Stelton John”, I could have said, but instead I opt for: “And are you still heavily involved in the day-to-day activity of the brand?” They confirm that they are. (I think I pulled that back, and still have, “Does the brand have exciting consumer-facing events planned for National Vegetarian Week?” up my sleeve.)
Some would say vegetarian food has evolved since Linda McCartney founded her frozen ready-meal brand, that it has moved on from textured vegetable protein and meat facsimiles, but I don’t know. If your household is non-meat and you come in late and tired, or your kids truck up with friends, what are you going to want to do? Whip some McCartney “burgers” out of the freezer or embark on an Ottolenghi featuring 72 ingredients, several of which you’ve never heard of? (Some of those recipes “run to five pages”, confirms Mary.) It remains the bestselling frozen-food range of its kind – sit on that, Quorn! – and I have to say that, when I cooked a load at home, to see what it was like, the “sausage rolls” went down brilliantly well. “People can’t tell the difference,” says Mary. “I think they are amazing. The meat in sausage rolls is so overprocessed. Is it really meat? Or just eyeballs?”
As it happens, I found a copy of Linda McCartney’s first vegetarian cookbook – Home Cooking, published in 1989 – knocking about my house. I know I have used it down the years, particularly the recipe for beetroot with dill and sour cream. “That’s Mum’s Russian-Jewish heritage coming in,” says Mary.
“Borscht,” says Paul, gnomically.
“Borscht didn’t even exist in this country at that time,” says Mary. “Or quiche. We didn’t have quiche in Britain in that day and age.”
“It depended what class you were from,” says Paul. “3A or 3B.”
“This idea,” says Mary, “that Mum took things people weren’t eating in this country and had the courage to write a book and be ridiculed.”
“It was for one reason,” says Paul. “She loved, loved, loved animals. People would see something a bit creepy, like a frog or something, and they’d go, ‘Ewww,’ and Linda would always say, ‘Its mummy loves it.’ ”
“And you can’t argue with that,” says Stella.
I put it to them that Linda was truly a pioneer, no question, but I am not convinced by the recipe for spaghetti omelette. “My kids love it,” says Stella. On the other hand, it could work, I add, really, really quickly.
Home Cooking was, in fact, Bloomsbury’s bestselling book until Harry Potter came along. But finding a publisher was not easy initially. Linda wrote it with food author Peter Cox, and as he is quoted as saying, in Philip Norman’s biography of Paul, “I went to see one woman who was supposedly a legend in the industry, and who always wore white gloves to the office. She told me a vegetarian cookbook couldn’t possibly sell unless it had some chicken in it.”
“That,” says Paul, “was the climate of the time. There wasn’t vegetarian food. There was one restaurant, Cranks, which Yehudi Menuhin was something to do with, and I always thought that was kind of funny, that he called it Cranks. It was kind of self-deprecating and I liked that.” Was it good? “I never went there as I wasn’t vegetarian then.” I guess we’ll never know.
I say the other thing Peter Cox said is that, throughout the writing process, he kept a copy of Jane Asher’s bestselling book on cakes to hand, so that whenever Linda’s attention flagged, as it was wont to do, he’d take it out and start flicking through it with great interest, and that brought her back into the room. Paul laughs and claps, while Stella says, “That is very funny … Would bring her back into the room!”
We then flick through Linda’s book while I comment on the dated photography, which makes everything look so … dingily brown. The “macaroni turkey” – a substitute for a Christmas turkey, sculpted from macaroni – looks especially worrying. “You had to make it because you couldn’t get a vegetarian turkey at Christmas,” says Paul. “It was great,” says Stella. I can now see it could be great, I say, really, really quickly.
And do you remember Linda writing it? “She would have Peter Cox round,” says Paul, “and quite often I’d be in the kitchen, because I was just there, and she’d cook something.” And then photograph it in brown? “And then she’d photograph it in brown.”
“Mum,” says Stella, “was instinctive in the way she cooked, and Peter had to stop her.”
“He’d say,” continues Paul, “ ‘Just before you put that in, let me measure it.’ ”
“I remember,” says Mary, “making a stew and thinking, ‘This tastes rubbish,’ and I phoned Mum and the extra thing was celery.” “Celery is critical,” adds Stella. “She would start all her soups with celery,” says Paul. “Mum and celery, it’s true,” concludes Stella.
Linda – who died of breast cancer in 1998 – was, indeed, ridiculed for her vegetarianism, as all the McCartneys have been. Oh no, here they come, the bloody McCartneys, banging on about not killing cows, and now fish, too. “At the end of the day, what people are forgetting to talk about is fish,” says Stella. “We need to be aware that fish is a stealth industry,” says Mary.
But they’ve proved themselves menschen, have kept at it, haven’t caved on their principles, or gone away quietly. “Almost a third of land is used for livestock production,” Stella might say. “Ninety-five per cent of soya is grown for farm animals,” Paul might add. “The reality of the conversation is that it has to become political,” Mary might further add.
But more and more people have come round to their way of thinking, which must be satisfying. “When I was a child and we said we were vegetarian it was a case of, ‘Why don’t you kill animals to eat them?’ I was the outsider, and you did meet a lot of aggression and anger. But now the landscape is changing,” says Mary. I ask if they’ve seen Simon Amstell’s Carnage, which puts the best case against meat-eating ever. Not yet, they say. You should, I say. They will, they promise. I can’t believe I had to alert you to it, I say. How have you all managed without me for so long? “I’m all for shadowing you and just absorbing,” says Mary. I’m busy, but might be able to fit you in for an afternoon, as a favour. “Thanks,” she says.
I am quite interested in Paul’s food memories. As a working-class boy from Liverpool, when did you first encounter an avocado, say? “I was in Soho,” he remembers, “and we went to a restaurant with George Martin. We were all slightly mystified by the menu and I thought, ‘I can do this,’ so I ordered an avocado pear for dessert, because I’m thinking pear melba, or maybe it’s going to be like stewed pears, and this sniffy Italian waiter said, ‘That is not a dessert, sir.’ I said, ‘Yeah, I know that. Just kidding you.’ I was about 21.”
“And your dad,” says Stella, “brought you back bananas, didn’t he? Because he worked in the cotton trade.”
“It was after the war,” says Paul, “when nobody had had bananas, and he brought some back and said, ‘Look! Bananas!’ We’d never seen them or tried them or anything, and we didn’t like them. He was annoyed.”
And was your mum a good cook? “Yeah, in the traditional way. I ate what everyone else ate growing up. There was no variation. You knew that if you went to a friend’s house it would be the same as at your house. Just like us, they would have mandarin oranges from a tin with Carnation milk. That was very well accepted.”
After you left home and before Linda, would you have cooked? “I lost my mother when I was 14, so there was my dad, my brother and me. My dad would drop into the Cavern where we were playing at lunchtime and he’d say, ‘Here’s tonight’s meal, son,’ and he’d leave me a few chops. I’d get home before him so I’d grill the chops and do mashed potato.”
“It’s always his job, the mash,” says Stella.
Are you competent in other domestic areas, Paul? Could you work a washing machine? “No, I can’t.”
“But,” says Stella, “you can hand-wash in a sink with soap.”
“When we were on tour you did do your socks, because they would get a bit smelly,” confirms Paul. “So before you’d go to bed you’d give them a good rub in the hotel sink, with the little soap, then rinse them out and hang them on the radiator.” I think he is referring back to when he was in that band, whatever it was.
They do miss Linda dreadfully. We meet just before Mother’s Day, and I think they wouldn’t have been willing to say how much they still miss her if I hadn’t mentioned it’s a hard time to get through when you’ve lost your mother, as I have, and there’s all this stuff in the shops. They do it because, much as I’ve been joking around, they are, clearly, kindly people. “You definitely notice it,” says Mary. “I also notice mums and daughters walking down the street and you know they are having a lunch or a shop and are having that little moment.”
“At the end of the day,” says Stella, “for a fraction of a second, I think I can’t believe Mum hasn’t called me today.”
“You did that recently?” asks Paul. “That’s normally the first year, when that happens a lot.
“A friend has just lost her husband and I was saying to her, ‘You think he’s going to walk in the door, don’t you?’ And she said, ‘Yes.’ ”
“You’re going to get me going,” says Stella.
“But look at Mum’s achievements,” counters Mary. “They are so relevant. The balls she had. I am so proud she left a legacy and that she is in each and every one of us.”
Stella adds that she gets it in the neck “for not using fur or leather in my career”, but she doesn’t care. Is grateful to her mother, in fact, “for giving me the spectacles that have allowed me to have a point of view”.
The PRs are madly trying to wind us up now so, as she’s mentioned her fashion range, I decide I’m just going to have to come out with it straight, so I do: can I get a discount? “Yes,” she says, adding, almost with a wink, “and Stelvis.” We’ve bonded. I’ve arrived.
Typically, I then push my luck. I could be up for adoption, I say to them all. I would make a good McCartney. I would bring my own celery. And I’d bring your Jewish quotient zooming back up. “My wife [Nancy Shevell] is Jewish,” says Paul. Decent cook? “No, bless her. When we married she was intimidated by Linda’s reputation, so she said, ‘I’m a lousy cook.’”
“She’s a very good orderer,” says Stella. “She is a very good orderer,” confirms Paul.
They’re half out the door, but time for one last question. Paul, were you in some band or other, back in the day? “Yes. The Quarrymen.” Were you any good? “Damned good. Great little band.” Never heard of them. Sorry.

Deborah Ross has since given up meat
——–
Photos: Robert Wilson
Shoot credits Stella McCartney: Make-up Jane Bradley, hair Lewis Pallett

Fur prices are so confusing like…

Why, does a professional trapping/fur selling/fur buying place say that a squirell pelt is worth 45 cents. Raccoon $2. Opossum 5 cents!!??

I get that the pelts are untanned but I’ve never seen a pelt untanned sell for any less than like $20.

Anyone know why it’s like that? Is it in bulk of like 1000!? They should still be worth more. God knows I wouldn’t be able to kill an animal for 45 cents.

TalesFromYourServer: When you need to do math and it goes wrong.

Hey there, first time post. Also, English is not my first language.

I work in a Chinese take away behind the till, so I don’t know if this story fits here. I’m not exactly a server per se, but I wanted to share.

So, I’m at work and this customer orders his food at me. His total came at €30,55. He pulls out a €50 bill and to make it easier for me, he also gives me another €1, making his change €20,45. When I went into my till to give him his change he says: “Keep the change.” I was stunned. I wanted to say something about it, but he already took a seat to wait for his order to be made. He probably thought the change would just be 45 cents.

It took me like half a minute to speak out. “Sir, you do know that it’s 20 euros and 45 cents in change, right??”

He realized he made a mistake, stood up, and apologized. “Ow, damn, my bad”, he laughs awkwardly. I gave him his change in full, also laughing awkwardly.

Would he have missed that 20 euro bill if I hadn’t told him? Sometimes I do wonder…

By: SolarJoker

!!A LOT OF THE NUMBERS ARE GUESSTIMATE BECAUSE REBUBBLE WON’T LET ME UPLOAD NEW WORKS OR LOAD MY EXISTING WORKS!!

Ok serious talk, if you’re able to make your own stickers instead of having to use a website like say, Redbubble, then please do.

Why?

Redbubble changes the price of a product depending on how much of the percentage you want to earn. (I.e. you want 50% of profit) 
A reasonable price for stickers is $2 (which is like 10% profit or so)
“But what does that mean?”
 That means you the artist will get paid in dirt. A measly .45 some cents.

Right now I have my own stickers set at like 100 some%, that makes the public price $4+ dollars just so I can get $2 back.

THAT’S TOO EXPENSIVE FOR A SMALL 2″ STICKER

And get this, most of your sales (if you’re lucky) will come from like “If you bought this, you’ll like this” recommendations to customers and that’s usually to apply a discount.
Now you’re small .45 cents will now be .23 cents.

Redbubble is shit and you deserve better.

Now, if you don’t have the essentials to make your own and you have no other way besides Redbubble and other similar sites to make your stuff, that’s ok. I understand the struggle. 
But please, do try to find a way to eventually make your own because
 you deserve so much more for your work!

Theatre will be dead in 50 years unless it fixes 'disgusting' ticket prices

Theatre will be dead within 50 years unless outrageous ticket prices are curbed, an award-winning director has said.

Robert Icke, who is currently directing Andrew Scott as Hamlet in the play’s transfer to the Harold Pinter Theatre, said younger audiences simply could not afford the amount now charged for seats.

Scott, who agreed to Hamlet’s West End transfer only on the condition that it would offer cheap seats for the under 30s, called modern price schemes “disgusting”.

Robert Icke, the director

A study by the Society of London Theatre earlier this year found the average theatre ticket price had risen by five per cent to £45, although top-priced tickets for West End shows have been known to go as high as £240.

“I am so passionate about it,” said Scott, best-known to fans for his role as Moriarty in Sherlock. “I think it’s disgusting the pricing of theatre tickets in this country. We have to do something about it.

“However much we talk in the theatre about bringing young people in, you can’t pay £75 or £80 or £90 for a ticket.”

Andrew Scott in Hamlet, transferring to the West End

Speaking on BBC Front Row, Icke added: “It makes me really angry because theatre has a big problem with younger audiences.

“The industry’s going to have to address it and sort it out because otherwise we’re dead. In 50 or 60 years, there will be no audience.”

Hamlet, which transfers to the West End from the Almeida Theatre, has tickets on sale from £15 to £95, with 300 tickets for under £30 at every performance.

Hamlet is designed to captivate younger audiences

The discount tickets, Scott said, were “absolutely a condition of doing the transfer, for both of us”.

Speaking of the importance of winning younger audiences over to modern theatre, Icke said: “It’s sort of a one shot kill now because theatre is so expensive that it’s our responsibility to make it as exciting as Netflix or the Xbox.

“So that if there is somebody who’s never been to see this play, or indeed a Shakespeare play, or maybe any play before…I want them to leave thinking ‘that was exciting. And I might like to do that again, or go back and see something else’.”

Labour now has a six-point lead over the Tories, new poll finds

Labour is now ahead of the Tories for the first time since Jeremy Corbyn became leader, a new poll has found.

Mr Corbyn’s party is now polling at 45 per cent, six points ahead of the Tories who are lagging behind on 39 per cent.

The Survation poll, conducted for the Mail on Sunday, shows a swing of eight points in Labour’s favour since the general election on 8 June.

Labour has now overtaken the Tories despite being more than 20 points behind when Theresa May first called for a general election.

The news comes as Ms May is expected to enter a “confidence and supply” arrangement with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) in an attempt to shore up her position as Prime Minister.

The Tories fell short of a majority in the general election, losing 13 seats, and it is now expected they will now be running a minority government via a non-binding agreement with the DUP.

Under the confidence and supply deal, the DUP would not have any of its MPs become government or cabinet ministers but would support Conservative legislation on a case-by-case basis.

It potentially hands the party more leverage over the Conservatives than a formal coalition in which they would become part of the government.

The move has been met with widespread criticism, as questions have been raised about the DUP’s stance on homosexuality and abortion.

Anti-DUP protestors stood outside the Downing Street gates on 10 June and chanted “Tories out, refugees in” and “Tories out, Corbyn in”.

General election poll: Tory lead shrinks by 10 points in two weeks

The Conservative Party lead over Labour has narrowed to five points, down from 15 points two weeks ago, according to an opinion poll by Ipsos Mori.

Just six days before the general election, the poll showed the Tories’ share of the vote had fallen to 45 per cent, down four percentage points since the previous poll published on 18 May.

Labour’s share of the vote increased by six points to 40 per cent.

The poll is the latest to show a narrowing lead for the Prime Minister – who held a 24-point lead before the start of campaigning.

Meanwhile, the Liberal Democrats hold a total of seven points, according to the Ipsos Mori figures, published in the London Evening Standard on Friday.

Theresa May’s personal opinion poll ratings are also said to have fallen to their lowest yet, following a series of blows to the Tory campaign.

Ms May has struggled in recent weeks after she was forced into an embarrassing U-turn over the party’s proposals to reform social care.

She faced further criticism this week after she declined to take part in televised debates, sending Home Secretary Amber Rudd in her place.

A YouGov opinion poll this week showed the Conservatives’ lead had fallen to just three points.

Support for Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour leader, is said to be growing because of Ms May’s proposals to scrap universal free school meals, and fears of higher care costs under a Conservative government.

Before the publication of the Tory manifesto, women were divided 49-35 for the Conservatives over Labour.

Since the row over social care came to light, the gap has closed to 45-44.

Gideon Skinner of Ipsos Mori said: “Here’s more evidence of the Conservatives’ wobbly week, with Labour improving again and the last two weeks of campaigning seeing a big hit to the Prime Minister’s personal ratings.

“But remember this is just a snapshot of a period of time, not a prediction – the Conservative vote share remains high, May is still seen as the most capable Prime Minister, and they still have the support of older people.”

The Conservative leader still held a clear lead of 50 per cent when voters were asked who would be a more capable Prime Minister, although that gap has also narrowed by six points since last month.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF DAVID N. DONIHUE

Poster from 1999 play by underground writer / director David N. Donihue

Below is a collection of works and hard to find memorabilia taken from 20 years of Donihue’s writing and directing of poems, plays, films and music videos. Below is taken from a series of articles and a couple photos from Donihue’s own private collection.

Donihue was born in rural Eastern Washington and raised near the Green River Killer in Auburn, Washington. He started writing plays that were performed for 45 cents in his back yard and local parks when he was as young as seven. His first film was made when he was eleven, utilizing a rented video camera and two borrowed VCR’s with stereo cables. His father was a pastor. His mother, a well known Christian Devotional author. 

The controversial writer got his first negative reviews at the age of 15, when he was nearly expelled from his conservative town’s high school for writing the below story -


MR. CLOWN (1990, Age 15)

Mr. Clown was a happy clown.
He loved making children happy.
And they were happy and the parents were happy.
And everyone was happy.

Until Mr. Clown realized he could no longer please children.

They wanted to be transformers and deformers and things with no form whatsoever.
And so then the children were unhappy and the parents were unhappy.

Until Mr. Clown decided to blow himself up into many little pieces and then
the children were happy and the parents were happy and Mr. Clown never had to be sad again.

The End.


Donihue handled the rejection of his early art well yet refused to take another writing course again. It should be noted, he was later nominated for a Film Fare Award for his writing on Parzania, the highest honors in India and one of the largest international awards one can receive. The film, was an anti-religious violence piece.

By his mid teens, Donihue was writing feature length plays. During these years, Donihue began to work graveyard shifts at a local college radio station, KGRG-FM, as an overnight DJ.

There, he became obsessed with experimental music and film, and directed a series of student films. These included Anthony’s Apocalypse and Inside Anthony’s World. During this era, at age 18, he wrote Hold My Hand & Tell Me I’m Not Insane, a comedy-drama about a young playwright whose scripts follow his life, yet later dictate it. The play was produced in Seattle with its premiere at the Scottish Rite Hall on Capitol Hill.

During his early twenties, Donihue wrote, directed, acted in and produced a string of independent plays within the northwest including Hey Baby Do Ya Wanna Come Back To My Place and Justify My Existence, and another pop psychology comedy Brain Aches And The Quest For Redemption Of A Telephone Psychic as well as the forty-minute short film Love Me Tender, Pay Me Well.

In 1998 Donihue began performing under the stage name Punko and released an indie album titled The Day Bob Went Electric. The comedicly performed yet earnest album garnered regional radio and Donihue continued to perform the sad and sweet parody like tunes until his final show at sxsw in 2007.


POEMS & LYRICS - LATE 90′s


projections (1997)
you expect me to become what you project

my eyes are drifting to the clouds once again

I see the colorless planet and am ashamed

I see the vibrant vivid crashing rain

crashing down with sincerity

why does it take pain to 

transcend us a bit of honesty 

in this day and age


and all of my daydreams come crashing in

singing dum dee da lum dum dum dee lumm dum

and all of your projections threaten to transend

screaming dum de da lum dumand 

all of my daydreams function once again
run in the sunshinelike 

your drift in the daydream light

like that colorless drifting look in your eyes

I’m still the same no matter what you bring to my life

I’m still the same I can drift inside


on account (1997)
on account that your strung out and

there’s no doubt I lost my mind

I’m a tripper & a spinner & I’m stuck on overdrive

I’m a preacher and a seeker 

like watching Jimmy kiss the sky

And all about that day & how you sat me down 

& changed my life

There’s no reason to be seasoned 

if you’ve seen the world flash by

Look at what’s going on

Yet they are strong

He’s my brother like a summer like a daydream whitworth time

He’s a prisoner and I miss him wonder who he’ll be next time

He’s a liver & a giver & I’m sorta trapped inside

Look at what’s going on

Yet they are strong


I’ve seen all the young idealist turn into what they despise

I’ve seen all my daydreams take me right on through this daylight life

I’ve seen people try to heal me just so they could feel alive


Donihue during this era directed the little seen feature The Humanity Experiment.

In 2005, Donihue wrote and produced the first “non-trippy” film of his career, Parzania. It was directed by Rahul Dholakia.

The internationally acclaimed feature was nominated for the eastern hemispheres Oscars, the film fare award for Best Picture and Best Screenplay and Best Story. Leads Sarkia and Naseeruddin took home Best Actor Nominations. The film is considered by many accounts, to be one of the most controversial films in the eastern hemisphere.[8]

The English language thriller, based on the true story of the Gujarat Riots of 2002, was initially banned in India, caused a storm of protests and bomb threats, and later garnered praise from the New York Times, Variety, Indiewire and many others.[9] It was shown in New York as part of the Museum of Modern Arts’ India Now film exhibition.[10] Donihue was nominated for Filmfare Awards for Best Screenplay and Best Story for Parzania. The film won the Screen Gem Award for Best Picture.

While at the same time, he was developing something revolutionary -

In 2010 Donihue’s epic four and a half hour interactive choose your own adventure film The Weathered Underground was released by Indican starring Heroes Brea Grant. The comic book inspired picture went on to become a small cult classic and is now shown as part of curriculum at many of the worlds best film schools. Considered one of the most daring voices to come out of the independent underground film scene, 

in 2014 Donihue directed another socially driven action comedy, The Bang Brokers, which is currently headed for distribution.

Mr. Donihue’s love for music driven short films continues, having recently directed over 30 music videos / short films in the last two years for EDM acts such as Moguai, Mark Sixma, Thomas Gold and EDM legend John Dahlback.

Below is a collection of poems and stills from the music videos from the last two years.

Keep reading

youtube

Shocking anti-Semitism on streets of Britain.

With as many as 45 per cent of British Jews fearing they ‘may not have a future in Britain’, according to a survey by the Campaign Against Antisemitism - and following an experiment by Israeli Zvika Klein on the streets of Paris, British journalist

Jonathan Kalmus decided to test the levels of prejudice in two British cities with shocking results.

'You Jew’ was the anti-Semitic scream which came from a passing car. My shaken wife tried to explain it away to my seven-year-old daughter as a very large sneeze. They were simply playing in a local park in Manchester a few weeks ago when the incident ripped through what should have been a peaceful and wholesome time for any mother and child.

'Fight the Jewish scum’ and 'Jew, Jew, Jew… Run’, were the more vicious threats hurled at me in the past few days, however, when I decided to secretly film and find out whether 'Jew-hatred’ really is alive and kicking on British streets.

The answer to that question is a resounding and heart-sinking yes.

Language Warning : Read more here

Herb of the Week-Cashew

Common names

Cajueiro
Cashew Nut Shells
Jambu

Cajueiro (botanical name, Anacardium occidentale) is an evergreen tree found in the tropical regions and belongs to the plant family which also includes mango, poison oak and poison ivy. Although cajueiro is indigenous to Brazil, it now grows in all regions of the world having tropical climatic conditions. This tree grows up to a height of 30 feet (10 meters) and produces big oval-shaped leaves. Cajueiro bears flowers that have a yellow hue with pink stripes and emerge on the extended stems. The fruit of cajueiro is basically a coagulated stem. However, the actual fruit of this tree is found immediately under the thickened part of the stem and it encloses red or yellowish flesh that envelops the cashew nut. After the bark or shell of the nut is removed, it is mainly used as a food.

As mentioned earlier, cajueiro is indigenous to the northeast coast of Brazil, people in the region had domesticated (started cultivating) cashew much before the Europeans arrived in the country around the end of the 15th century. Later, the European traders as well as explorers ‘discovered’ and also documented cashew in 1578. From Brazil, cajueiro was taken to India as well as East Africa and it became naturalized in these places soon.

Cajueiro has a number of medicinal uses and is available in the form of a tincture. This tincture is effective for treating diabetes, but in this case the patients need to have patience before the results are evident. It would take a minimum of three to four weeks before the favorable results of low blood sugar are noticed. Nevertheless, diabetics using this tincture should measure their blood sugar levels every day to ensure that the combination of the prescribed insulin and/ or additional medications with cajueiro does not reduce the blood sugar levels too much. The shell of the cajueiro cashew encloses natural oil that may result in irritation of the skin provided it is not heated earlier to remove much of the caustic property of the oil. Hence, it is advisable that you should never consume raw cashew. However, they are safe after they are roasted in their shell.

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  Okay guys so I’m still in need of money for my traveling situation. For some background on what’s going on, this March I’m going on a trip to China through my college for spring break. The trip itself is 10 days long and while I have most of it covered I’m responsible for extra expenses, such as 20 meals for myself, a SIM card for my phone, visa, extra money to buy plenty of water (as an alternative to boiling tap water in the hotel), trinket money, etc. So that’s a LOT to cover.

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