40-followers

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Juan Manuel Montes may be the first “DREAMer” deported under Donald Trump

  • Federal authorities deported 23-year-old California resident Juan Manuel Montes, who has lived in the U.S. since the age of nine and twice received Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals protections under Barack Obama’s administration, in what appears to be the first case of a DACA-protected “DREAMer” being deported under President Donald Trump.
  • According to USA Today, Customs and Borders Protection officers approached Montes in Calexico, California on Feb. 17, after Montes had left his wallet in a friend’s car. 
  • Just three hours later, Montes found himself deported to Mexico.
  • “Some people told me that they were going to deport me; others said nothing would happen,” Montes told USA Today. “I thought that if I kept my nose clean nothing would happen.” Read more (4/18/17 5:40 PM)

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2

Standing Rock prepares for what could be its last stand against the Dakota Access pipeline

  • A confrontation is coming to Standing Rock.
  • After  Trump signed an executive order to restart construction for the Dakota Access pipeline project, both sides are settling in for what could be the final confrontation between law enforcement and the peaceful resistance at Standing Rock.
  • Leaders of the Standing Rock Sioux and their allies have received word that after Feb. 22, the evacuation deadline set forth by the Army Corps of Engineers, police will begin a forcible evacuation of the camp and its structures. According to Chase Ironeyes of the Lakota People’s Law Project, this could begin as soon as the day after the deadline.
  • As they hope for thousands of additional bodies to arrive in time for the showdown, hundreds remain at the Standing Rock camps intent on seeing the resistance through.
  • But their numbers are a far cry from the 8,000 to 10,000 who were present in early December when a tentative victory was declared. Read more (2/14/17 12:40 PM)

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Off-duty LAPD officer fires gun during physical struggle with Latino teenage boy

  • An armed off-duty Los Angeles police officer fired his weapon during a scuffle with a 13-year-old boy on Tuesday, sparking protests in Anaheim, California, on Wednesday night.
  • According to KTLA 5, the Anaheim Police Department cited kids continually walking on the officer’s lawn as the reason for the altercation. Cell phone footage, however, suggests there’s more to the story.
  • A bystander began filming once the struggle was already underway and later posted the video to YouTube. 
  • In it, a teenage boy in a hooded sweatshirt pushes back against a bald man in a blue checkered shirt who is holding him by the collar. Read more (2/23/17 6:40 AM)

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40 FOLLOWERS !!!!!!!

THANK YOU SO MUCH!! 

i didnt see the 40 followers landmark but we currently have 42, THANK YOU SO SO SO SO SO MUCH !!!! i never thought my blog would even get past 20 followers and im so happy :’) thank you for all the support and notes and i wish i could give you something back in return !!!! BUT APRIL FAVOURITES IS COMING SOOOON..

thank you for everyone who has stuck around !! 

Hey guys, my Conspiracy crew, can you do something for me? For yourselves? For literally everyone on this site? Please don’t fight with strangers on the Internet. After all these years I still don’t understand why we’re doing this. There are SO many people on this site that don’t like what we have to say and you know what? That’s perfectly fine. Don’t fight them. Don’t call them names. And you know what else? Don’t stick up for yourselves when they do it to you. Yeah. I’m suggesting you take it.

Everyone on this site is trying to have fun. I get dragged all the time but I’ve never once, not once in a year on this site, engaged someone who vehemently disagreed with me. Anyone can check my blog, you’ll never find an example of me 1) attaching myself to other’s posts to disrespect them 2) publishing hateful anons 3) Calling anyone names 4) giving the microphone to people who don’t like me. It’s not hard.

I once lost 40 followers in one day a few months ago because I stuck up for a Sheriarty blog who, I believed, made a good point. And you know what? Good. I didn’t want those people on my blog anyways.

People are going to attack you all day long. Stay in your own lane. Use the appropriate tags. Don’t take everything personally. We’re here to have fun. How can you possibly have fun arguing with strangers about a TV show? Block who you need to. Avoid certain tags.

People are going to read your blog. They decide if they like what you have to say or if they don’t. The choice is always theirs. No need to assert your ideas to people who don’t agree with you or don’t like what you have to say. Those who want to listen, they will stay. And, honestly, most of those bloggers you don’t like will leave you alone if you leave them alone.

You don’t have to listen to anything i just said, if you don’t want to. This is just a suggestion. But I’m having a great time on this site because I get back what I put in.

7

Morrissey is selling a t-shirt with his lyric “black is how I feel on the inside” and a photo of James Baldwin

  • British singer Morrissey is in hot water after selling merchandise at concerts featuring the face of writer James Baldwin, who is currently the subject of critically beloved documentary I Am Not Your Negro.
  • Featuring Baldwin’s face is not the problem. On the shirt, hovering around Baldwin’s face like a racist halo, are the lyrics to the Smiths’ “Unloveable”: “I wear black on the outside ‘cause black is how I feel on the inside.” Yikes.
  • People on Twitter were quick to point out the racism of using Baldwin’s image to promote a lyric that has nothing to do with blackness — and doing so to make a profit. Read more (3/17/17 11:40 AM)

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Journal of a New Graduate:

Day 1:

I’m a new grad, I went to a great school, didn’t miss a clinical, a good study group, focused prep for NCLEX, passed with relief at only 75 questions, accepted into the first position applied for - the position I’d dreamed of all through nursing school. It just seemed too good to be true. I’m excited to be here in nursing orientation, excited but nervous about what the next twelve weeks will bring.


Day 7:

I’m a bit confused with what I’m supposed to be doing. My educator seems to be disorganized, giving me the wrong packet, one that’s supposed to be for another nurse, and vaguely waving her hand she’ll get it to me “at some point”. That was two days ago, I’m in the Library, doing some online learning that I happened to find out about from a fellow new graduate. I hope that’s what I am supposed to be doing. My educator waved me off again, saying she would catch up with me at some point.
Sure.


Day 12:

I’m on the unit. Gulp. I completed the online learning, mostly in my own time, since the modules I was doing wasn’t actually what I was supposed to be doing. I completed the work on my own, as my educator emailed me a packet late Friday, stating it needed to be completed by Monday. I was two days late, despite staying up late every night to do it. Today I’m on the unit, I’m shadowing my preceptor, who wasn’t told I was coming. I’m beginning to think I chose the wrong place. My Preceptor seems really annoyed, muttering to another nurse that she was tired of orienting new nurses. I feel like I don’t belong.


Day 18:
I’m tired, and It hasn’t even been a month yet. My preceptor yelled at me for fumbling with an arterial line set up, saying I would have to do this on my own someday, and I shouldn’t be expecting her to be right next to me every time. I sat in my car on my lunch and cried, so no one would see. Fine. I can take the yelling, except I haven’t ever actually seen an arterial line before, just on the computerized learning module. I haven’t practiced with one yet. I don’t belong here.


Day 24:
I saw my educator today. I’d forgotten what she looked like. She pulled me into a mid point evaluation with the nurse manager and preceptor. They all looked grim. I wasn’t progressing in the way they’d hoped, or expected by this point. They wrote up my error in levelling the EVD, when I had never seen one before, despite my asking my preceptor for help, only to hear the same, “You have to learn to do these things on your own.” They wrote a verbal warning that I wouldn’t make it through orientation with my slow time management skills, and I just sat there and nodded. They didn’t ask me how I was feeling, and I didn’t want to tell them. They already wrote me off a long time ago.


Day 30:
I asked my preceptor today what her experience was like as a new graduate. She said I had it easier than her, then she turned away. Whatever.


Day 40, last day orientation:
Today, I met a patient who probably saved me (even though we’re supposed to be saving them, I suppose). She was young, maybe 21, s/p cardiac arrest r/t overdose on red bull, Her family and friends perched on seats at her bedside, praying. “Get them out,“ barked my preceptor, “you always spend too much time talking to the families. Just another young punk overdose.” So, after 40 days of following her instructions, today I did the opposite. Today I closed the curtains in the little corner room of the ICU, and I sat with the family, and asked them to tell me about her; tell me about your daughter, tell me about your sister, tell me about your friend. Tell me about how she’s been feeling, tell me about what she did the night before the ER. “She was quiet, she wanted to be a nurse, but she just kept failing all her exams. We think she might have tried to take her own life, but the doctors breezed through all that. They just assumed she was some wasted teen on a Saturday night trying to get high.”
And I knew, it wouldn’t matter what my preceptor had said about taking too long with patients, some day I would speed that up, it wouldn’t matter that I had fumbling hands with A-line, someday I would get it, someday I wouldn’t be so nervous. It wouldn’t matter that every day I felt abandoned by my educator or preceptor, or apologetic for the disappointment they thought I was, as one day I would have the confidence to not look for that validation. It would matter only that I could listen, and maybe use what little skill I had, not learned from any textbook, not garnered from any preceptor, something that would remind me to keep fighting for the patients who couldn’t fight for themselves. Someday I would be faster at that, too.
And so, on the very day I planned to quit, the very day I “graduated” from my preceptorship, I survived. I survived orientation, and it wasn’t because anyone had fought for me. It was because I fought for myself, alone.


~ As told by a graduate nurse, 6 years before she became a preceptor, a mentor, and a charge nurse who remembered what it was like to walk in a new orientee’s shoes.