4 rifles

Jeopardy Question:

On Jeopardy the other night, the final question was “How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the tomb of the Unknowns?” All three contestants missed it!

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

1. How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the tomb of the Unknowns
and why?

21 steps:
It alludes to the twenty-one gun salute which
is the highest honor given any military or foreign
dignitary.

2. How long does he hesitate after his about face to begin his return walk and why?

21 seconds for the same reason as answer number 1

3. Why are his gloves wet?

His gloves are moistened to prevent his losing his grip on the rifle.

4. Does he carry his rifle on the same shoulder all the time and, if not, why not?

He carries the rifle on the shoulder away from the tomb. After his march across the path, he executes an about face and moves the rifle to the outside shoulder.

5. How often are the guards changed?

Guards are changed every thirty minutes, twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year.

6. What are the physical traits of the guard limited to?

For a person to apply for guard duty at the tomb, he must be between 5’ 10’ and 6’ 2’ tall and his waist size cannot exceed 30.
They must commit 2 years of life to guard the tomb, live in a barracks under the tomb, and cannot drink any alcohol on or off duty for the rest of their lives. They cannot swear in public for the rest of their lives and cannot disgrace the uniform or the tomb in any way.

After two years, the guard is given a wreath pin that is worn on their lapel signifying they served as guard of the tomb. There are only 400 presently worn. The guard must obey these rules for the rest of their lives or give up the wreath pin.

The shoes are specially made with very thick soles to keep the heat and cold from their feet. There are metal heel plates that extend to the top of the shoe in order to make the loud click as they come to a halt.

There are no wrinkles, folds or lint on the uniform. Guards dress for duty in front of a full-length mirror.

The first six months of duty a guard cannot talk to anyone nor watch TV. All off duty time is spent studying the 175 notable people laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery .A guard must memorize who they are and where they are interred. Among the notables are:

President Taft,
Joe Lewis {the boxer}
Medal of Honor winner Audie L. Murphy, the most decorated soldier of WWII and of Hollywood fame.

Every guard spends five hours a day getting his uniforms ready for guard duty..

ETERNAL REST GRANT THEM O LORD AND LET PERPETUAL LIGHT SHINE UPON THEM.

In 2003 as Hurricane Isabelle was approaching Washington , DC , our US Senate/House took 2 days off with anticipation of the storm. On the ABC evening news, it was reported that because of the dangers from the hurricane, the military members assigned the duty of guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier were given permission to suspend the assignment. They respectfully declined the offer, “No way, Sir!” Soaked to the skin, marching in the pelting rain of a tropical storm, they said that guarding the Tomb was not just an assignment, it was the highest honor that can be afforded
to a service person. The tomb has been patrolled continuously, 24/7, since 1930.

God Bless and keep them. We can be very proud of our men and women in the service no matter where they serve.

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-Back to Action-

Que empieze la Masacre, Yeah i needed say that in spanish xD - anyway , Here is a Collection for @texd41 with her 3 most importants OCs : 

Spartan A54 Aka Karen Neves 

Spartan D41 Aka Tex (  Mary Derwolsfmseer )

Spartan E28 Aka Derrick Derwolfsmeer ( Black Bird )

( With Some references :P ) Hope you like it Tex! ..next one…Bid…stay alert guys 

On Jeopardy the other night, the final question was “How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the Tomb of the Unknowns?" 

All three got it wrong. 

This is really an awesome sight to watch if you’ve never had the chance. 

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier 

1. How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the tomb of the Unknowns and why? 

Twenty-one steps. It alludes to the twenty-one gun salute, which is the highest honor given any military or foreign dignitary. 

2. How long does he hesitate after his about-face to begin his returning walk and why? 

Twenty-one seconds for the same reason as the answer of #1.

3. Why are his gloves wet? 

His gloves are moistened to prevent him from losing his grip on the rifle. 

4. Does he carry his rifle on the same shoulder all the time and if not, why not?

He carries the rifle on the shoulder away from the tomb. After his march across the path, he executes an about-face and moves the rifle to the outside shoulder. 

5. How often are the guards changed? 

Guards are changed every thirty minutes, twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year. 

6. What are the physical traits of the guard limited to? 

For a person to apply for guard duty at the tomb, he must be between 5’ 10″ and 6’ 2″ tall and his waist size cannot exceed 30″. 

Other requirements of the Guard: 

They must commit two years of life to guard the tomb, live in a barracks under the tomb, and cannot drink any alcohol on or off duty for the rest of their lives. They cannot swear in public for the rest of their lives and cannot disgrace the uniform or the tomb in any way. After two years, the guard is given a wreath pin that is worn on their lapel signifying they served as guard of the tomb. There are only 400 presently worn. The guard must obey these rules for the rest of their lives or give up the wreath pin. The shoes are specially made with very thick soles to keep the heat and cold from their feet. There are metal heel plates that extend to the top of the shoe in order to make the loud click as they come to a halt. There are no wrinkles, folds or lint on the uniform. Guards dress for duty in front of a full-length mirror. The first six months of duty a guard cannot talk to anyone, nor watch TV. All off duty time is spent studying the 175 notable people laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery. A guard must memorize who they are and where they are interred. Among the notables are: President Taft, Joe E. Lewis (the boxer) and Medal of Honor winner Audie Murphy, (the most decorated soldier of WWII.) Every guard spends five hours a day getting his uniform ready for guard duty. 

In 2003 as Hurricane Isabelle was approaching Washington, DC, our US Senate/House took two days off with anticipation of the storm. On the ABC evening news, it was reported that because of the dangers from the hurricane, the military members assigned the duty of guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier were given permission to suspend the assignment. They respectfully declined the offer. Soaked to the skin, marching in the pelting rain of a tropical storm, they said that guarding the Tomb was not just an assignment, it was the highest honor that can be awarded to a service-person. 

The tomb has been patrolled continuously, 24/7, since 1930.

12 Things We Learned from Jordan Peele's Get Out Commentary

There’s not much I can say about Get Out that hasn’t already been said. Jordan Peele’s auspicious directorial debut is not only one of the best films of the year, it’s one of the most important. In addition to delivering the thrills and chills of an effective horror movie, Peele addresses racial tensions head-on without coming off as sanctimonious. Furthermore, he proved that movies with black leads can be successful at the box office.

With such a unique perspective, I was eager to hear what the first-time filmmaker had to see in his audio commentary that accompanies Get Out’s home video release. He concludes the track by confessing that he debated remaining ambiguous about the meaning of certain aspects, a la Stanley Kubrick. Thankfully, he decided to “totally nerd out” and divulge every detail he could fit into 104 minutes.

Here are 12 things I learned from Jordan Peel’s Get Out commentary track. Spoilers follow, so don’t read on until after you’ve seen the movie.

Keep reading

2

“Ambushed”

SURPRISE GIFT *EXPLODES* in this one go for @archangel470 feacturing he oc Ben , i love do Cameos with any , repeat ANY of my pals in this comunnity soo i needed Return the cameo , Enjoy!

( I love the two versions with the -Alerted Alarm- and the -Darker- )

WWII Firearms in Libya Part 2

Part 1 // WWII Armor Wrecks in Libya

During the 2011 rebellion against dictator Muammar Qaddafi, all sorts of weapons found there way into the hands of the rebels. Some were improvised, such as this S-75 SAM mounted on a T-55, some were contemporary, and some were older than the fighter who wielded them.

Lee-Enfield Mk IV. The British Empire’s rifle of choice from 1888 to 1957, the Lee-Enfield is just as ubiquitous in irregular warfare as is the Mosin-Nagant. The Lee-Enfield remained in widespread British service until the early/mid-1960s and the 7.62x51 sniper variant remained in service until the 1990s. As a standard-issue infantry rifle, it is still found in service in the armed forces of some Commonwealth nations, notably with the Bangladesh Police. The Canadian Forces’ Rangers Arctic reserve unit still used Enfield No.4 rifles as of 2012.

Browning M1919. The US military’s standard medium machine gun of WWII, the M1919 saw service with most of America’s allies during the war in some function. The M1919 was developed from the water-cooled, WWI-era, M1917. The emergence of GPMGs in the 1950s pushed the M1919 into secondary roles. The United States Navy also converted many to 7.62x51 and commonly mounted them on river craft in the 1960s and 1970s in Vietnam. The gentlemen above is using a M1919 on a tripod designed for the Belgian MAG 

This man wields a M1919A6, a standard M1919 upgraded with a pistol-grip and shoulder-stock for portable firepower. The M1919A6 was supposed to replace the BAR, but it was extremely heavy (32lbs) and performed poorly when compared to the MG34 and MG42.

The same man with the same M1919A6, seen from a different angle and some comrades armed with somewhat more modern weapons

MP38. The predecessor to one of Nazi Germany’s most famous weapons, the MP40. The MP38 was in turn based on the MP36, an earlier prototype. The MP38 was a simplification of the MP36, and the MP40 was a further simplification of the MP38, with certain cost-saving alterations, most notably in the more extensive use of stamped steel rather than machined parts.

Cut-down Kar 98k. The standard service rifle of Nazi Germany, the Kar 98k was a shortened version of the earlier Gewehr 98 that served Imperial Germany. Millions were captured by the Soviets at the conclusion of World War II and were widely distributed as military aid. The Karabiner 98k therefore continues to appear in conflicts across the world.

Bonus: M1 helmets. Often referred to as the “steel pot,” the M1 was used by the United States military from World War II until 1985, when it was succeeded by the PASGT helmet. These helmets lie burned and broken in the ruins of a bunker hit by NATO coalition forces.

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Algerian Jezail

Manufactured in Algeria c.~1800.
~.70 caliber 4′8″ rifled barrel, miquelet flintlock, engraved and embossed brass fittings.

Probably the most accurate personal firearm of the era, due to its large war caliber, long barrel and rifling - although rifled barrels weren’t common due to the hand-made nature of these weapons.