3rd Battalion

2

Many that live deserve death. Many that die deserve life.

SGT Joshua P. Rodgers and SGT Cameron H Thomas, both from 3/75, were KIA in Nangahar province, Afghanistan on April 27, 2017, during combat operations.

The 75th took a devastating hit with the loss of two great Rangers, but their sacrifice was not in vein. Around 20+ EKIA during the TIC and around 50 EKIA via airstrikes after exfil.

Rest easy. Rangers Lead The Way.

flickr

2nd Cavary Regiment by The U.S. Army
Via Flickr:
Spc. Matthew Williams,a cavalry scout assigned to 2nd Cavalry Regiment fires a Stinger missile using Man-Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADs) during Artemis Strike, a live fire exercise at the NATO Missile Firing Installation (NAMFI) off the coast of Crete, Greece Nov. 6, 2017. (Photos by Sgt. 1st Class Jason Epperson, 10th AAMDC PAO)

10

October third and fourth of 1993…

The Battle of Mogadishu took place on October 3rd and overnight to the 4th. This mission was apart of Operation Gothic Serpent. Members of the 75th Ranger Regiment, Air Force Rescue and Air Force Combat Controllers, 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment - Delta, and pilots from the 160th Spec Ops Aviation Regiment. The overall goal was to swarm in to a meeting in the city between Mohamed Adids lieutenants. Shortly after large groups of armed militants attacked the U.S. Forces and shot down two Black Hawk helicopters. In the end, 18 service members died, along with 80 injured. Many personnel were awarded for their actions. Two Delta Force snipers received the Medal of Honor after fighting and perishing while defending one of the crash sights.

Lest we forget the deceased

** - SFOD  Delta - **

MSG Gary Ivan Gordon - Killed defending Super 6-4   - Received Medal of Honor and Purple Heart

SFC Randy Shughart - Killed defending Super 6-4 - Received Medal of Honor and Purple Heart

SSG Daniel D. Bush - Crashed with Super 6-1, mortally wounded defending the crew - Received Silver Star and Purple Heart

SFC Earl Robert Fillmore, Jr. - Killed moving to the first crash sight - Received SIlver Star and Purple Heart

MSG Timothy “Griz” Lynn Martin - Mortally wounded by an RPG on the ‘Lost Convoy’, and died en route to Germany's Field Hospital - Received Silver Star and Purple Heart

- 3rd Ranger Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment - 

CPL James “Jamie” E. Smith - Killed around the crash sight of Super 6-1 - Received Bronze Star with Valor Device, and Oak Leaf Cluster as well as a purple heart

SPC James M. Cavaco - Killed on the Lost Convoy - Received a Bronze Star with Valor Device, Purple heart

SGT James Casey Joyce - Killed on the Lost Convoy - Received a Bronze Star with Valor Device, Purple Heart

CPL Richard “Alphabet” W. Kowaleski, Jr. - Killed on the Lost Convoy by a RPG - Received Bronze Star with Valor Device, Purple Heart

SGT Dominick M. Pilla - Killed on Strueckers Convoy (1st Convoy to move back to base) - Received Bronze Star with Valor Device, Purple Heart

SGT Lorenzo M. Ruiz - Mortally wounded on the Lost Convoy and also  and died en route to Germany’s Field Hospital - Received Bronze Star with Valor Device, Purple Heart

** - 160th SOAR - **

SSG William “Wild Bill” David Cleveland, Jr. - Killed on Super 6-4 (Crew Chief) - Received Silver Star, Bronze Star, Air Medal with Valor Device, Purple Heart

SSG Thomas “Tommie” J. Field - Killed on Super 6-4 (Crew Chief) - Received Silver Star, Bronze Star, Air Medal with Valor Device, Purple Heart

CWO Raymond “Ironman” A. Frank - Killed on Super 6-4 (Copilot) - Received Silver Star, Air Medal with Valor Device, Purple Heart

CWO Clifton “Elvis” P. Wolcott - Killed in Super 6-1 Crash (Pilot) - Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with Valor Device, Bronze Star, Purple Heart

CWO Donovan  "Bull" Briley - Killed in Super 6-1 crash (Copilot) - Received Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star, Air Medal with Valor Device, Purple Heart

** - 14th Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division - **

SGT Cornell Lemont Houston, Sr. - Killed on the rescue convoy - Received Bronze Star with Valor Device, de Fleury Medal, Purple Heart

PFC James Henry Martin, Jr. - Killed on the rescue convoy - Received Purple Heart

** - Malaysian Army - **

LCPL Mat Azan Awang - Killed when his vehicle was struck by an RPG - Received Seri Pahlawan Gagah Perkasa

6

Soldiers and Marines of the Philippine armed forces in Marawi City celebrate and are all smiles after hearing the good news.

“Finally after more than 6 months, 160 soldiers KIA and 1000 enemy kills. Justice is served to the top honchos of the Maute Daesh ISIS group.

Clean kills from 4th Light Reaction Company sniper team and rangers from the 3rd Scout Ranger ‘Excelior’ Battalion got the privilege of delivering the final blow to Isnilon Hapilon and Omar Maute.”

“Canadian Armed Forces members from C-Company, 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, (3PPCLI) fire a 84MM recoilless rifle (Carl Gustav) in a defensive position during Exercise SABRE STRIKE in Poland on June 7, 2017 as part of Operation REASSURANCE.

Photo by: MCpl Brandon O'Connell, Image Tech, 3rd Cdn Div PA
WA2017-0025-25”

On Puerto Rico’s southwestern corner, the sleepy seaside town of Guanica is where, nearly 120 years ago, the U.S. relationship with the island began during the Spanish-American War. The town’s museum director, Francisco Rodriguez, takes visitors to the town’s waterfront where the invasion began. In Spanish he says, “This is Guanica Bay, where the American troops commanded by General Nelson Miles landed on July 25, 1898.” At the site, a stone marker engraved by the 3rd Battalion of the U.S. Army commemorates the invasion.

Nearly 19 years after the invasion, President Wilson signed the Jones-Shafroth Act, granting citizenship to people born on the island. But it’s a limited form of citizenship. The law puts Puerto Rico under federal control but doesn’t allow the island voting representation in Congress. Residents also can’t vote for president. That law started a debate that continues today over what exactly the island’s relationship with the U.S. should be. And now in Puerto Rico, there’s a new push to fix what many see it as a deeply-flawed relationship.

Puerto Ricans Reflect On A Century Of (Limited) Citizenship

Photo: Greg Allen/NPR

2

Canadian sniper holds the record for longest confirmed kill once again with the C15.

McMillan TAC-50 C15 .50 BMG

Overview
The McMillan Tac-50 is a manually operated, rotary bolt-action rifle. The large bolt has dual front locking lugs, and its body has spiral flutes to reduce weight. The heavy match-grade Lilja barrel is fluted to dissipate heat quickly, reduce overall weight and is fitted with an effective muzzle brake to reduce recoil. The fiberglass McMillan stock is designed to be used with a bipod. The buttstock is adjustable for length of pull with rubber spacers and can be removed for compact storage.


Specifications
Manufacturer: Mcmillan

Model: TAC-50 C15

Calibre: .50 BMG

Action: Bolt

Trigger Type: Adjustable, set at 3.5 lbs.

Barrel Specifications: 29" Fluted Match Grade Free-Floating Barrel Threaded with Muzzle Brake

Twist Rate: 1:15"

Sights: 5" 30 MOA Picatinny Action Rail

Finish: Matte Black

Stock Description: Adjustable Stock in Olive Drab with Black Marble

Capacity: 5 Round Detachable Box Magazine

Weight: 12 Kg

Overall Length: 57"

Classification: Non-Restricted

Accessories Included: These rifles come with 1 x 5 round magazine, bipod, Pelican case, optic rail and QD buttstock with adjustable integral cheekpiece. 

Additional Features: Extra-long bolt handle to clear large optics


A sniper with Canada’s elite special forces in Iraq has shattered the world record for the longest confirmed kill shot in military history at a staggering distance of 3,540 metres.

The Canadian Armed Forces confirmed Thursday that a member of Joint Task Force 2 made the record-breaking shot, killing an Islamic State insurgent during an operation in Iraq within the last month.


“The Canadian Special Operations Command can confirm that a member of Joint Task Force 2 successfully hit a target at 3,540 metres,” the forces said in a statement. “For operational security reasons and to preserve the safety of our personnel and our Coalition partners we will not discuss precise details on when and how this incident took place.”

The elite sniper was using a McMillan TAC-50 sniper rifle while firing from a high-rise during an operation that took place within the last month in Iraq. It took under 10 seconds to hit the target.

“The shot in question actually disrupted a Daesh [Islamic State] attack on Iraqi security forces,” said a military source. “Instead of dropping a bomb that could potentially kill civilians in the area, it is a very precise application of force and because it was so far way, the bad guys didn’t have a clue what was happening.”

The military source said the JTF2 operation fell within the strictures of the government’s advise and assist mission.

“As stated multiple times in the past, members of the Canadian Special Operations Task Force do not accompany leading combat elements, but enable the Iraqi security forces who are in a tough combat mission,” the statement said. “This takes the form of advice in planning their operations and assistance to defeat Daesh through the use of coalition resources.”

The kill was independently verified by video camera and other data, The Globe and Mail has learned.

“Hard data on this. It isn’t an opinion. It isn’t an approximation. There is a second location with eyes on with all the right equipment to capture exactly what the shot was,” another military source said.

A military insider told The Globe: “This is an incredible feat. It is a world record that might never be equalled.”

The world record was previously held by British sniper Craig Harrison, who shot a Taliban gunner with a 338 Lapua Magnum rifle from 2,475 metres away in 2009.

Previously, Canadian Corporal Rob Furlong had set the world record in 2002 at 2,430 metres when he gunned down an Afghan insurgent carrying an RPK machine gun during Operation Anaconda.

Weeks before, Canadian Master Cpl. Arron Perry briefly held the world’s best sniper record after he fatally shot an insurgent at 2,310 metres during the same operation. Both soldiers were members of the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry.

JTF2 special forces are primarily tasked with counterterrorism, sniper operations and hostage rescue. Much of the information about this elite organization is classified and not commented on by the government. The unit’s snipers and members of Canadian Special Operations Regiment, who are carrying out the main task of training Kurdish forces, have been operating in tough conditions in Iraq.

The Trudeau government pulled CF-18 fighter jets out of Iraq in 2016 but expanded the military mission, which will see the number of Canadian special forces trainers climb to 207 from 69 in an assist, train and advise mission. Canadian commandos are not supposed to be involved in direct combat, but are authorized to go up to the front lines on training missions with Kurdish Peshmerga fighters and to paint targets for coalition air strikes.

For operational security reasons, sources would not reveal the names of the elite Canadian sniper and his partner, nor the location where the action took place.

A sniper and his observer partner are often sent to remote and dangerous locations to hunt down insurgents while having to carry heavy equipment. Once they have located the target, snipers follow the same methodical approach before each shot. Breathe in, out, in, out, find a natural pause and then squeeze the trigger.

Canada has a reputation among Western military forces for the quality of its snipers, despite the small size of the Canadian Armed Forces compared to the United States and Britain.

“Canada has a world-class sniper system. It is not just a sniper. They work in pairs. There is an observer,” a military source said. “This is a skill set that only a very few people have.”

The skill of the JTF2 sniper in taking down an insurgent at 3,540 metres required math skills, great eyesight, precision of ammunition and firearms, and superb training.

“It is at the distance where you have to account not just for the ballistics of the round, which change over time and distance, you have to adjust for wind, and the wind would be swirling,” said a source with expertise in training Canadian special forces.

“You have to adjust for him firing from a higher location downward and as the round drops you have to account for that. And from that distance you actually have to account for the curvature of the Earth.”

U.S. Sergeant Bryan Kremer has the longest confirmed sniper kill shot by a U.S. soldier. He killed an Iraqi insurgent with his Barrett M82A1 rifle at 2,300 metres in 2004.

A U.S. Army sniper Specialist watches over members of his unit, C Company, 3rd Battalion, 66th Armor Regiment, Task Force 228, 172nd Infrantry Brigade as they tend to a Soldier who injured his knee. The unit was on a joint mission with the Afghan National Army into the mountains outside Forward Operating Base Tillman. Paktika Province, Afghanistan Sept, 2011. 

76 years today, the skies of Crete became filled with the crosses of the Luftwaffe and parachute canopies as the Fallschirmjäger of the 7th Flieger Division dropped from their Ju-52 transport planes, often right on top of the Allied defenses.

As a result many were shot dead even before hitting the ground. To make things worse, they jumped armed only with pistols or machine-pistols. Their rifles, sub-mgs and heavier equipment being dropped separately in containers. Getting rid of the parachute and finding the containers while under fire from the well prepared defenses proved a deadly task and the number of casualties raised accordingly.

In this photo, two fallschirmjäger, lucky enough to have survived the drop and find their weapons, look towards the coast and their next objective.

The spot has been wrongly identified as being near Suda Bay. Using the mountain tops in the horizon I believe I managed to identify the correct location as the hills near Maleme airfield, looking North-west (comparison in comments). Part of the runway can be seen on the left, half hidden by the soldier.

If true, these men probably belonged to the 1st (Koch) or 3rd Battalion of the 3rd Fallschirmjäger Regiment. They had dropped on Hill 107, defended by the 22nd New Zealander Battalion. It is on the slopes of Hill 107, overlooking the airfield that stands today the German War Cemetery.

Original: B. L. Davis Collection