3ded

Protesters Rally Outside Offices of Pro-Government Tabloid in Belgrade

Hundreds of protesters marched on the offices of Informer, a pro-government tabloid newspaper, in Belgrade on April 24 — the latest in a string of protests following Prime Minister Alexander Vucic’s victory in presidential elections on April 2.

The protesters claim Vucic was given strong backing by both state-run and private media companies during his election campaign.

Vucic was elected president with 55 percent of the vote, and is expected to continue the country’s path towards EU integration while maintaining close ties to Russia. Although the office of president is largely a ceremonial role, demonstrators are concerned he will maintain control over government through his Serbian Progressive Party. Credit: Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty via Storyful

Vizio announces lots of new soundbars and a multi-room speaker
Vizio is expanding its speaker collection. The highlight of the line, according to Vizio, is a 36-inch 5.1 wireless soundbar system that can produce 101 dB of sound. The 5.1 system is designed for large rooms and includes a three-speaker soundbar, two satellite speakers, and a wireless subwoofer. Read more
Female sex workers should be thought of in same way as male soldiers and boxers, Cambridge academic says

An economics lecturer at Cambridge University has spoken out in defence of prostitution, questioning why the sex work industry is “neglected” by economists.

Victoria Bateman insisted that women have as much right as men to earn money from their bodies, arguing that economists were “inconsistent” in their treatment of the “largely female profession” compared with male-dominated occupations such as “soldiering and boxing”.

Writing in the Times Higher Education magazine, Dr Bateman said: “For society to be inconsistent is one thing. For supposedly rational economists to be likewise is another. As a profession, we economists need to be standing up to irrational societal norms.

“The inconsistent treatment of a largely female profession compared with largely male professions is nothing other than sexism under the cover of ‘well-meaning’ paternalism. Those engaging in consensual sex work need to be helped to benefit from markets that work with them rather than against them.

“The neglect of the sex trade is an eloquent symbol of fact that women are under-represented among economists, but it cannot go on. However dismal your view of prostitution, there is no question that this oldest of trades is ripe for study by the dismal science.”

The economist implied it was wrong that the pornography industry, despite generating a revenue larger than many big companies, was not considered as worthy of economic study, only receiving serious attention from gender studies.

“The pornography industry has been estimated to generate more revenue than Microsoft, Amazon, Google, Yahoo, eBay, Netflix and Apple combined,” Dr Bateman added.

“It has also been expanding, alongside facing significant disruption from changing technology and greater competition. It has the makings of a textbook case study for any serious economics student. However, it is territory that currently receives serious attention only from gender studies.

“The usual justification is that the sale of sex is ‘immoral’ and preys on the most vulnerable in society. But there is a logical inconsistency with the way that we think about consensual prostitution compared with the male-dominated spheres of soldiering and boxing.”

It is not the first time Dr Bateman made a controversial stand. Last summer, the economist arrived naked to a faculty meeting of economists with the words “Brexit leaves Britain naked” written across her stomach and breasts, in protest against the decision to leave the EU.

Dr Bateman said at the time that she had hoped to raise questions about the depiction of women and “challenge the blinkered association between the body and sex”.

The US just dropped the 'mother of all bombs' on an ISIS target in Afghanistan

(The US and Britain on October 7, 2001, launched a first wave of air strikes against Afghanistan.REUTERS/USAF handout)

The US has deployed the largest non-nuclear bomb in its inventory on an ISIS target in a remote part of far northeast Afghanistan, according to CNN analyst Barbara Starr.

Four US officials with direct knowledge of the mission said the US had dropped the GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb, aka the “Mother of All Bombs” or “MOAB,” over the Achin district of Afghanistan’s Nangarhar province, which borders northwest Pakistan.

The MOAB, which was developed during the Iraq war, is the US’s largest non-nuclear bomb and had not been deployed on the battlefield until now. It weighs 21,000 pounds and was dropped at 7 p.m. local time on Thursday.

“This is a weapon that would be used against a large footprint on the ground,” Starr said on CNN. The target in question was reportedly an ISIS complex with a camp and tunnels and where personnel were assembling.

The area is very close to the Pakistan border, Starr said, and “is still a border that is not really controlled.”

“And they have seen ISIS develop on the Afghanistan side of the this border,” she added.

The MOAB’s deployment comes just a few days after a US Special Forces operator was killed in the same region of the country during operations against ISIS. 

“The soldier was mortally wounded late Saturday during an operation in Nangarhar Province” in eastern Afghanistan, US Navy Captain Bill Salvin said on Twitter on April 8.

The US and NATO war in Afghanistan will enter its 16th year in 2017. 

The US has deployed heavy ordnance in the country before. In November 2001, during the initial invasion of Afghanistan, the US dropped “daisy cutter” bombs, which weighed 15,000 pounds and were first used in Vietnam, on Taliban positions. 

NOW WATCH: Watch the Navy’s LOCUST launcher fire a swarm of drones



More From Business Insider
The US just dropped the 'mother of all bombs' on an ISIS target in Afghanistan

(The US and Britain on October 7, 2001, launched a first wave of air strikes against Afghanistan.REUTERS/USAF handout)

The US has deployed the largest non-nuclear bomb in its inventory on an ISIS target in a remote part of far northeast Afghanistan, according to CNN analyst Barbara Starr.

Four US officials with direct knowledge of the mission said the US had dropped the GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb, aka the “Mother of All Bombs” or “MOAB,” over the Achin district of Afghanistan’s Nangarhar province, which borders northwest Pakistan.

The MOAB, which was developed during the Iraq war, is the US’s largest non-nuclear bomb and had not been deployed on the battlefield until now. It weighs 21,000 pounds and was dropped at 7 p.m. local time on Thursday.

“This is a weapon that would be used against a large footprint on the ground,” Starr said on CNN. The target in question was reportedly an ISIS complex with a camp and tunnels and where personnel were assembling.

The area is very close to the Pakistan border, Starr said, and “is still a border that is not really controlled.”

“And they have seen ISIS develop on the Afghanistan side of the this border,” she added.

The MOAB’s deployment comes just a few days after a US Special Forces operator was killed in the same region of the country during operations against ISIS. 

“The soldier was mortally wounded late Saturday during an operation in Nangarhar Province” in eastern Afghanistan, US Navy Captain Bill Salvin said on Twitter on April 8.

The US and NATO war in Afghanistan will enter its 16th year in 2017. 

The US has deployed heavy ordnance in the country before. In November 2001, during the initial invasion of Afghanistan, the US dropped “daisy cutter” bombs, which weighed 15,000 pounds and were first used to clear helicopter landing zones in the jungles of Vietnam, on Taliban positions. 

NOW WATCH: Here’s footage of the US military’s new helicopter that’ll cost as much as an F-35



More From Business Insider
The US just dropped the 'mother of all bombs' on an ISIS target in Afghanistan

(The US and Britain on October 7, 2001, launched a first wave of air strikes against Afghanistan.REUTERS/USAF handout)

The US has deployed the largest non-nuclear bomb in its inventory on an ISIS target in a remote part of far northeast Afghanistan, according to CNN analyst Barbara Starr.

Four US officials with direct knowledge of the mission said the US had dropped the GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb, aka the “Mother of All Bombs” or “MOAB,” over the Achin district of Afghanistan’s Nangarhar province, which borders northwest Pakistan.

The MOAB, which was developed during the Iraq war, is the US’s largest non-nuclear bomb and had not been deployed on the battlefield until now. It weighs 21,000 pounds and was dropped at 7 p.m. local time on Thursday.

“This is a weapon that would be used against a large footprint on the ground,” Starr said on CNN. The target in question was reportedly an ISIS complex with a camp and tunnels and where personnel were assembling.

The area is very close to the Pakistan border, Starr said, and “is still a border that is not really controlled.”

“And they have seen ISIS develop on the Afghanistan side of the this border,” she added.

The MOAB’s deployment comes just a few days after a US Special Forces operator was killed in the same region of the country during operations against ISIS. 

“The soldier was mortally wounded late Saturday during an operation in Nangarhar Province” in eastern Afghanistan, US Navy Captain Bill Salvin said on Twitter on April 8.

The US and NATO war in Afghanistan will enter its 16th year in 2017. 

The US has deployed heavy ordnance in the country before. In November 2001, during the initial invasion of Afghanistan, the US dropped “daisy cutter” bombs, which weighed 15,000 pounds and were first used in Vietnam, on Taliban positions. 

NOW WATCH: A Navy SEAL explains what to do if you’re attacked by a shark



More From Business Insider