31st MEU

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Last set of photos on my company on deployment.

U.S. Marines with Company F, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), conduct an amphibious assault with soldiers of the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF) as part of the Japanese Observer Exchange Program at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan, April 28, 2015. The JGSDF was integrated with the 31st MEU in order to better understand amphibious operations. 

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Richard Currier/ released) 

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Riding off into the sunset.

Marines and Sailors with Company E., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, board a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, for a raid rehearsal as a part of Talisman Saber 2013. Talisman Saber 2013 is a biennial training activity aimed at improving Australian Defense Force and U.S. combat readiness and interoperability as a Combined Joint Task Force. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously deployed MEU.

(Photo by Cpl Codey Underwood, 17 JUL 2013.)

Sailors aboard amphibious dock landing ship USS Germantown (LSD 42) help recover Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts (CRRC) attached to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) in the ship’s well deck.

Sgt. Joshua Garcia, squad leader for 2nd squad, 2nd platoon, Company F, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and naitive of Victorville, Calif., and Sergeant 1st Class Yoshimitsu Shintomi, squad leader and coxon with 1st Company, 51st Infantry Regiment, 15th Brigade, Western Army, Japan Ground Self-Defense Force and native of Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan, hold security next to combat rubber raiding craft during their integrated amphibious raid.

Working alongside the 31st MEU, the Japanese soldiers conducted various amphibious-borne training evolutions aimed at strengthening both militaries’ interoperability. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.

(Photo by Corporal Jonathan Wright, 22 SEP 2012.)

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CAMP HANSEN, OKINAWA, Japan – Marines execute fast-rope techniques out of a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter Jan. 8 at a landing zone on Camp Hansen. “It’s important for the Marines to be comfortable with their gear when coming down (the rope),” said 
Sgt. Gregory J. Dominguez. “In hostile environments, they can’t be scared to come down from the helicopter. They have to be focused.” Dominguez is a machine gun section leader with 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, currently assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, III Marine Expeditionary Force, under the unit deployment program. The Marines are with 2nd Bn., 5th Marines, and the helicopter and crew are with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 463, currently assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, under the UDP. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Natalie M. Rostran/Released)

Marines and sailors with Company E, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, board a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265 (Reinforced), 31st MEU, for a raid rehearsal as a part of Talisman Saber 2013, here, July 17. Talisman Saber 2013 is a biennial training activity aimed at improving Australian Defense Force and U.S. combat readiness and interoperability as a Combined Joint Task Force. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region and the only continuously deployed MEU.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl Codey Underwood / Released)

Water Warrior

A Marine with Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, uses his Supplemental Emergency Breathing Device prior to escaping the simulated helicopter seat during Shallow Water Egress Training at the Camp Hansen pool. The training allows the Marines to competently use their breathing devices and escape a submerged helicopter. The 31st MEU is the Marine Corps’ force of choice for the Asia-Pacific region and is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Andrew Kuppers/Released)

Marines assigned to 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) enter the well deck of the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) on a Combat Raiding Rubber Craft (CRRC). Bonhomme Richard is lead ship of the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group, and with the embarked 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), is conducting joint force operations in the U.S. 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility. 
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jerome D. Johnson/Released)

MEU Monday: In the Crows Nest

Sergeant Alexander M. Tryon scans the surrounding area for enemy forces during a vertical assault Dec. 10 at Combat Town. After acquiring a strong foothold within the town, the Marines cleared all of the buildings and searched for simulated high-value individuals. Tryon, from Cortland, Ohio, is a scout sniper with Weapons Company, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Ryan C. Mains/Released)

Hope for the best, prepare for the worst.

Marines with 2nd Platoon, Bravo Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, carry a simulated casualty on an improvised stretcher utilizing branches and their uniform blouses during the Jungle Endurance Course. After completing a two-week training evolution at the Jungle Warfare Training Center, the Marines underwent the four-mile-long course through the Okinawan jungle, utilizing the rappelling, rope-crossing, improvised stretcher carry and other skills they learned. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and remains the nation’s force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.

(Photo by Corporal Jonathan Wright, 20 April 2012.)

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Make it rain!

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Artillery Marines fire off rounds from M777A2 lightweight 155 mm howitzers April 3 at Su Seung-ri Range in the Republic of Korea as part of Exercise Ssang Yong 2014. The Marines shot off eight rounds during the calibration portion of the live-fire, followed by another 40 rounds in succession. Ssang Yong is an exercise that showcases the amphibious and expeditionary capabilities of the ROK and U.S. forces as well as the maturity of the relationship between the two nations. The Marines are with Golf Battery, 2nd Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment currently assigned to Battalion Landing Team 2nd Bn., 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lena Wakayama/Released)

MEU Monday

U.S. Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit observe explosives detonated from a safe distance at a demolitions range in Crow Valley, Tarlac province, Philippines, Oct. 8, 2014, during Amphibious Landing Exercise (PHIBLEX) 15. PHIBLEX is a bilateral training exercise designed to improve the interoperability, readiness and professional relationships between the U.S. Marine Corps and partner nations. (DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Joseph DiGirolamo, U.S. Marine Corps/Released)

Okinawa, Japan (Feb. 25, 2005) – A U.S. Marine low-crawls through muddy trenches during the endurance course at the Jungle Warfare Training Center on board Camp Gonslaves, Okinawa. The endurance course is a 3.4-mile obstacle course, which is part of a weeklong jungle skill training class. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class John P. Curtis (RELEASED)