30 abbey

me as i open an episode of downton abbey on amazon prime: ahh, sweet downton. such a quaint, soothing program for a peaceful afternoon. what would i do without you?

me after watching downton abbey for 30 seconds: PUT YOUR OWN FLIPPIN’ CLOTHES ON YOU STUPID RICH PEOPLE

3

George Harrison, Ken Scott, George Martin and Paul McCartney in the control room at EMI Studios, Abbey Road, during the “Hey Jude” recording session, 30 July 1968. More screen captures from that day have been posted previously.

“Working with George [Harrison] was always a joy.” - Ken Scott, Premier Guitar, 19 March 2010

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“[George Harrison] was so much more than The Beatles.
As a guitarist he eventually got his own unique sound when you could always tell it was him. There are very few guitarists that can say that. You can hear a blues guitarist and it could be any number of guitarists; their styles are very similar. With George, he was just completely different from anyone else.” - Ken Scott, Finding Zoso, 4 December 2012

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Ken Scott: “I learned very early on not to get star-struck. He [George Harrison] was the exception until the last day I saw him.”

Red Bull Music Academy: “Why him more than the other Beatles? It seems like he was the one you had the strongest relationship with.”

KS: “Yeah, I was the strongest with him. He was just an amazing person. There’s been so much written about him being dour and down the entire time and the quiet one. Eric Idle once said of George, that he was always quoted as being the quiet Beatle, but anyone that knew him knew that once he started there was no shutting him up. As far as being dour, he was one of the funniest people I’ve ever met. Just as an example, they were mixing “Yellow Submarine,” surround sound, at Abbey Road, and George and Ringo were invited to go and hear what they were doing. They’re upstairs listening, and it just so happened down in number one, the very big studio at Abbey Road, Mel Gibson was doing music for one of his movies, I think it was The Patriot at the time. And typically, with any of the Beatles, the top film stars, if it’s a Beatle they’ve got to meet them. It’s, they’re above everyone. So, Mel Gibson heard that Ringo and George were upstairs and he passed word up, could he go up and meet them. Word came back down, ‘Yeah, sure, send him up.’ So, he went upstairs and he meets Ringo first, he shakes hands and all of that, then it’s George’s turn, and George just turns and looks and he said, ‘I thought you said it was Mel Brooks.’“

(laughter)

"Mel Gibson’s jaw just hit the ground and George said, 'Don’t worry, I know who you are.’”

(laughter)

But that’s the way he was, he was an amazing individual. He could give two hoots about the business, really. He always used to get pissed off because it was always: 'George Harrison, ex-Beatle.’ And, he, ‘That was six years of my life, what about the rest of the stuff.’ He hated being that ex-Beatle being after his name all the time.“ - 2013

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“George Harrison has got a lot of, shall we say, bad press from one book [Geoff Emerick’s] and I want to dispute that. George was one of the funniest guys I ever met and I was blessed to spend a lot of time with George just before his passing, and just a quick story from that. One of the - we were putting together the remaster of All Things Must Pass, and Phil Collins, the ex-drummer of Genesis and also the lead singer, has often told this story in interviews, how he played on All Things Must Pass, he played congas on something. And no one remembers him playing on it, no one has any proof that he did it, but he has continually told this story. So whilst we’re doing the - some overdubs on additional tracks for the remaster, we have a percussionist by the name of Ray Cooper come in. And George - we’re finishing everything up and George then suddenly tells me to put up a particular track, and he says to Ray, ‘Okay, I want you to play congas on this, and I want you to play them badly. I don’t want them really badly, just off enough that it would really set someone slightly off.‘ So we recorded it, George said, ‘Okay, now do a quick rough mix of it and keep the congas up fairly loud.’ So I did that and we then made a CD of it, and George gave it to Ray and he said, ‘Next time you see Phil, give him this and tell him we finally found his congas.’ [laughter] So Ray goes, he sees Phil, he gives him this CD and apparently Phil was ecstatic: ‘Finally I’ve got the proof, I’ve got the proof!’ He takes it home, he plays it, he wants to cry. [laughter] Two weeks later, George called up and said, ‘Gotcha.’ [laughter] That was the Mr. Harrison I knew.” - Ken Scott, Beatlefest, 2013