27-january

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January 27th 1973: Paris Peace Accords

On this day in 1973, the Paris Peace Accords were signed in the French capital, ending U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. American involvement in the country went back to the 1950s, with Cold War fears of the region falling to communism leading a series of Presidents to steadily increase the presence of American advisers in Vietnam. Vietnam successfully achieved independence from the colonial French in 1954, which also resulted in the division of the country between the communist North under Ho Chi Minh, and the South under U.S.-backed Ngo Dinh Diem. The two sections soon broke out in fighting, and in August 1964 the United States fully committed to the war after the Gulf of Tonkin incident. This was when the North Vietnamese allegedly fired on American ships in the gulf, which resulted in Congress passing a resolution allowing the President to intervene in the war to counter the communists. The high casualty rates of American soldiers, and tales of horrific acts of violence like the My Lai massacre in 1968, prompted mass protests against the war in the United States. This increased opposition to the presidency of Lyndon Johnson, who declined to run for another term in 1968 and was succeeded by Richard Nixon. Nixon initially expanded the war into neighboring Laos and Cambodia, but then began to gradually withdraw troops from the war that had reached an unwinnable and bloody stalemate. The 1973 settlement, known as ‘An Agreement Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Vietnam’, included a cease-fire throughout Vietnam, as well as the withdrawal of U.S. forces. U.S. Representative Henry Kissinger and North Vietnamese Le Duc Tho were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts in Paris, though the latter refused the award. However the fighting in Vietnam continued until 1975, when Saigon fell to the North Vietnamese Army, and the nation was united under communist rule.

Next episode

“The Red Barn” — The team investigates a 25-year-old case that seems to involve both Red John and the Visualize group, and Lisbon contemplates her future, on THE MENTALIST, Sunday, Jan. 27 (10:00-11:00 PM, ET/PT)


Every RJ episode has strong Jisbon scene

I’m wondering what they meant  : “Lisbon contemplates about her future”

Best Albums of 2015 (so far) + Songs Mix

This is my 10th year of music blogging and I’m being spoiled rotten by how much great music has been released (it’s actually a bit overwhelming). From landmark albums from seasoned artists like Sufjan, Father John Misty and Kendrick to incredible debuts from Natalie Prass, Leon Bridges and Jamie XX, 2015 has it all, and looking at the upcoming release calendar, I doubt it’ll be slowing down any time soon. As usual, I’ve listed my best albums chronologically below and you can listen to my favorite songs in this ongoing Spotify playlist. Enjoy!

Best Albums of 2015 (so far)

Panda Bear - Panda Bear Meets The Grim Reaper (January 9, Domino)


Belle & Sebastian - Girls in Peacetime Want To Dance (January 19, Matador)


Natalie Prass - Natalie Prass (January 27. Spacebomb)


Father John Misty - I Love You, Honeybear (February 10, Sub Pop)


Dan Deacon - Gliss Riffer (February 24, Domino)


Kendrick Lamar - To Pimp A Butterfly (March 15, Top Dawg)


Hot Chip - Why Make Sense? (March 19, Domino)


Sufjan Stevens - Carrie & Lowell (March 30, Asthmatic Kitty)


The Mountain Goats - Beat The Champ (April 3, Merge)


San Fermin - Jackrabbit (April 21, Downtown)


Blur - The Magic Whip (April 28, Parlaphone)


Other Lives - Rituals (May 4, TBD)


The Tallest Man on Earth - Dark Bird is Home (May 12, Dead Oceans)


Jamie xx - In Colour (June 2, Young Turks)


Leon Bridges - Coming Home (June 23, Columbia)

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Honorable Mentions

The Staves - If I Was
Purity Ring - Another Eternity
Shamir - Ratchet 
Alabama Shakes - Sound & Color
Courtney Barnett - Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit

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Best Songs of 2015 (so far) Mix

Click here to listen to my ongoing Spotify Playlist. Here’s my 30 faves below…

Alabama Shakes “Gimme All Your Love”
Beirut “No No No”
Belle & Sebastian ”Play For Today”
Blur “Ong Ong”
Chromatics “In Films”
Courtney Barnett “Depreston”
Dan Deacon “When I Was Done Dying”
Destroyer “Dream Lover”
Eskimeaux - Broken Necks
Father John Misty “Chateau Lobby #4 (in C for Two Virgins)”
Hot Chip “Huarache Lights”
Jamie xx “Loud Places (ft. Romy)”
Kendrick Lamar  “These Walls”
Leon Bridges “Coming Home”
Mas Ysa “Margarita”
The Mountain Goats “The Legend of Chavo Guerrero”
Miguel “Coffee”
Natalie Prass “My Baby Don’t Understand Me”
Other Lives “2 Pyramids”
Panda Bear ”Crosswords”
Purity Ring “Heartsigh”
San Fermin “Emily”
Shamir “On The Regular”
Shura “2 Shy”
SOAK “B a noBody”
The Staves “Steady”
Sufjan Stevens “The Only Thing”
Tame Impala “Let It Happen”
The Tallest Man on Earth “Sagres”
White Reaper “Make Me Wanna Die”

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Most Anticipated of 2015 Still To Come

Destroyer - Poison Season
Frank Ocean - Boy’s Don’t Cry
Chromatics - Dear Tommy
Tame Impala - Currents
Beirut - No No No
Kanye West - Swish
CHVRCHES - TBD
Beach House - Depression Cherry
Disclosure - Caracal
White Reaper - White Reaper Does It Again

(photo via cubagallery)

27 January - International Holocaust remembrance Day. 

Despite the costly muddling, at the end of the war, 85% of Italy’s Jewish population survived the Shoah. This statistic begs for further investigation. Perhaps the very complexity of the Italian story has prevented its study. The facts of the Italian rescue effort are not well-known, even to some Italians, in part because the rescue was conducted in “Italian style” – people often acted on individual initiative, on the basis of a personal, humanitarian perception of a given situation, ignoring laws which they considered unjust, opting more often than not to save a life rather than to betray it, even at great risk to themselves. The sheltering of Jews, though not a universal phenomenon, was so pervasive that it can be considered a part of the national character of Italians.

Source: http://www.yadvashem.org/

youtube

Rush - Red Sector A (live)

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Today is the 70th anniversary of the end of Leningrad siege, which lasted for nearly 900 days.

8 September 1941 – 27 January 1944
(2 years, 4 months, 2 weeks and 5 days)

The 872 days of the siege caused unparalleled famine in the Leningrad region through disruption of utilities, water, energy and food supplies. This resulted in the deaths of up to 1,500,000 soldiers and civilians and the evacuation of 1,400,000 more, mainly women and children, many of whom died during evacuation due to starvation and bombardment.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Leningrad