2013: books

Read fiction.
Read history.
Read myth.
Read tragedy and farce, poetry and fairy tales.
You can learn from all of them.
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YOGA BOOK:  Every Body Yoga: Let Go of Fear, Get On the Mat, Love Your Body, by Jessamyn Stanley

I read Every Body Yoga recently and wanted to share my thoughts! 

CONTENTS: 

Jessamyn Stanley tells you about her yoga journey! As a broke, overweight, black female, her encounters with yoga were different than most people’s. 

I laughed out loud a lot. One of the stories that I liked:
She started off in a hot yoga class, planted in the back of the room (Hey, me too!). NO ONE set up their mat near her. She found out why soon after - turns out; she was at the back of the class next to the heater that blasts out the heat. 

Hearing her story in her words was the best part of this book for me. She was funny AND realistic. 

The book also contains your typical pose breakdowns and a little bit of flow suggestions. She uses non-traditional yoga models, which is lovely to see. 

She also answers a lot of questions about yoga. What is it? Who is it for? Is it a cult? 

Lastly, she does really sell an at-home practice. I have always stressed that people GO to a yoga studio, but Jessamyn definitely changed my mind. 

She does talk about racism and cultural appropriation, but the book was funny and sad and informative and not preachy. But your mileage may vary. 

GREAT FOR: people who are too nervous to start yoga, people who think they can’t do yoga, people who don’t have access to yoga, yoga instructors who teach beginners, etc. 

whenever I'm really into a book

me: okay I’ll stop at the end of this chapter 

*finishes chapter* 

*eyes jump over to the next page and read the first sentence of the new chapter* 

me: damn well I’ve already started it I might as well finish this chapter now

My sister lived in the moment. She said she would love the summer only when it came and warmed her. But I lived and still live in the future. Where it’s warm when it’s cold. Where dreams are not yet reality. Where the sad people are happy. The only problem with living in the future is that everyone has died, including yourself. So your plans are fiction and your predictions are fantasy. Living in the future is pure fantasy. I think that’s why I love it so dearly.
—  F.K. Preston, The Artist, The Audience and a Man Called Nothing