2012 transit

anonymous asked:

I feel so discouraged about my art and im gonna cry and give up I just... dont know anymore. can u maybe show a little time lapse of your art because you said you gave up for a few years and came back and i just wanna see.. please?

Babe, you can do it. I believe in you and I believe you will improve as long as you practice! I gave up on art and it was the worst decision I had ever made because art was (is) my life, it is what makes me happy and I’m sure you draw because you love it too! Take some time to look back at your old art and realize how much you have improved. Think about all the hours you put into this, you can’t just give up now, I believe in you!

Saint Asonia

Adam Gontier left Three Days Grace shorty after releasing their 2012 album Transit of Venus. He gave the the typical creative differences, pursue new endeavors excuse. I can’t blame him, Transit of Venus was a very dry album the only songs that stood out were Unbreakable Heart and the cover of Micheal Jackson’s “Give into Me”. 
When he announced his departure I thought he was going to do a solo project, but boy, I was wrong. We got a Super Group instead. Say hello to Saint Asonia. We have Staind’s Mike Mushok on guitar. Former Finger Eleven drummer Rich Deddoe and bassist Corey Lowery. This line up is phenomenal and so is their single they released. It has Gonter’s iconic vocals, so any fan of his will love this song.

Enjoy :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24IpuWmeiyM 

Because people seem to be confused/ask me this a lot:

I am a trans woman. 

I’m a trans woman who started her transition in 2006, and ended her transition in 2012.  In 2015, I rarely think about my gender and I honestly never speak about it outside of the Internet. I’m actually struggling to think of the last time I really had a conversation about me being trans. It’s just not relevant to my life at this direct space in time. It very much was at one point. 

I do not -identify- as trans and I do not -identify- as a woman. I am a woman. That is not my identity, it is simply the reality of my life. I am a woman who is not cis and that of course has made my life and certain things quite different from your average cis woman, but if there’s one thing I’ve learned, for myself, is that cis or trans being a woman in this world comes with complications. I felt the severe shift in how I was handled when my gender stopped confusing people and when even in men’s clothing I was seen as a woman. Perhaps a butch woman, but a woman. My life has been one where I was androgynous, not in the sense of your typical youtube, boy in makeup type androgyny. I literally was in a space where people just couldn’t figure out my gender.  It was very interesting being in a situation where someone would only ever introduce me as female and how that felt and how that would change and modify how people treated me. 

So long story short, because I am a woman who is read as cis and in truth hasn’t really faced transphobia in the way many people face transphobia, I have a specific passion for women’s issues, specifically black women’s issues because they are relevant to my experience and my treatment in this world. 

It’s hard to describe it, but I’m really at this place in life where mentioning that I’m trans feels forced. Feels like I’m honestly pushing the issue. It’s like mentioning that one time i had crutches when i was 9. I feels irrelevant - so I don’t really talk about it. Not even out of shame, but because it’s not something i’m really all that conscious about in this point in my life. On the flipside, I recognize that being read as cis comes with privileges and I really want to use that to help other trans people. As I grow as a youtuber, I get weary about mentioning my gender as people are so quick to invalidate my position because I’m trans, but think about how many people from all walks of life have found common ground and understanding in my words. that should tell you how valid my position is. 

Anywho, i’m ranting. I recorded a 45 minute video about this on my vlog channel. Just wanted to let everyone know who didn’t. I deliberately structure my channel in a way where you ~find out~ that I’m trans because i’ve always found that to be a pretty effective way of understanding the commonality cis people have with trans people. I may be wrong, but i know i’ve changed a lot of minds. 

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part 1

(click here for part 2)

okay here goes. this is a story i wrote and drew in late 2012, in a transition phase of my life when i needed to get a lot of things off my chest. this story was the outlet for lots of personal issues i had to deal with and as a result is a bit messy and raw, but still very close to my heart. i’ve grown a lot since as a person especially in regards to interpersonal relationships. but i still know what it feels like.

in technical terms, it’s unfinished, background inks and screentones are missing, and the ending is a bit rushed perhaps. read from right to left, like a manga. i’ll post it in parts because of the ten image upload limit.

i hope that somebody will be able to connect to it, and maybe you will see a part of yourself in it. i think at our core, people are not so different.

Mercury In the Spotlight

For more than seven hours on Monday, May 9, Mercury will be visible as a tiny black dot crossing the face of the sun. This rare event – which happens only slightly more than once a decade – is called a transit.

Although Mercury whips around the sun every 88 days – over four times faster than Earth – the three bodies rarely align. Because Mercury orbits in a plane 7 degrees tilted from Earth’s orbit, it usually darts above or below our line of sight to the sun. As a result, a Mercury transit happens only about 13 times a century. The last one was in 2006, and the next one isn’t until 2019.

When: On May 9, shortly after 7:00 a.m. EDT, Mercury will appear as a tiny black dot against a blazing backdrop, traversing the sun’s disk over seven and a half hours. Mercury will cross the edge of the sun (ingress) after 7:00 a.m. EDT. The mid-transit point will occur a little after 10:45 a.m. EDT, with egress around 2:30 p.m. EDT.

Where: Skywatchers in Western Europe, South America and eastern North America will be able to see the entirety of the transit. The entire 7.5-hour path across the sun will be visible across the Eastern U.S. – with magnification and proper solar filters – while those in the West can observe the transit in progress at sunrise.

Safety!

Unlike the 2012 Venus transit of the sun, Mercury is too small to be visible without magnification from a telescope or high-powered binoculars. Both must have safe solar filters made of specially-coated glass or Mylar; you can never look directly at the sun. We’re offering several avenues for the public to view the event without specialized and costly equipment, including images on NASA.gov, a one-hour NASA Television special, and social media coverage.

The Science…Why are Planetary Transits Important?

Transits like this allowed scientists in the 17th century to make the first estimates of Earth’s distance from the sun. Transit observations over the past few centuries have also helped scientists study everything from the atmosphere of Venus to the slight shifts in Mercury’s orbit that could only be explained by the theory of general relativity. Because we know Mercury’s size and location precisely, this transit will help scientists calibrate telescopes on solar observatories SDO, SOHO, and Hinode

Transits can also teach us more about planets – both in and out of our solar system. The Venus transit in 2012 provided observations of the planet’s atmosphere. Transits are also the main way we find planets outside the solar system, called exoplanets.

The transit method looks for a drop in the brightness of a star when a planet passes in front of it. This method will not find every planet – only those that happen to cross our line of sight from Earth to the star. But with enough sensitivity, the transit method through continuous monitoring is a great way to detect small, Earth-size planets, and has the advantage of giving us both the planet’s size (from the fraction of starlight blocked), as well as its orbit (from the period between transits). Our Kepler/K2 mission uses this method to find exoplanets, as will the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellites, or TESS, following its launch in 2017/2018. 

We will stream a live program on NASA TV and the agency’s Facebook page from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. – an informal roundtable during which experts representing planetary, heliophysics and astrophysics will discuss the science behind the Mercury transit. Viewers can ask questions via Facebook and Twitter using #AskNASA.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

How Well Do You Know Mercury?

Mercury is the smallest planet in our solar system and is only slightly larger than Earth’s moon. To give you some perspective, if the sun were as tall as a typical front door, Earth would be the size of a nickel and Mercury would be about as big as a green pea.

Mercury is the closest planet to the sun. Daytime temperatures can reach 430 degrees Celsius (800 degrees Fahrenheit) and drop to –180 degrees Celsius (-290 degrees Fahrenheit) at night.

Here are a few fun facts about Mercury:

  • Mercury takes only 88 Earth days to orbit the sun
  • If we could stand on Mercury’s surface when it is at its closest point to the sun, the sun would appear more than three times larger than it does here on Earth
  • Mercury is home to one of the largest impact basins in the solar system: the Caloris Basin. The diameter of this impact basin is the length of 16,404 football fields (minus the end zones) placed end to end!
  • Mercury is one of only two planets in our solar system that do not have moons (Venus is the other one)
  • Mercury completes three rotations for every two orbits around the sun. That means that if you wanted to stay up from sunrise to sunrise on Mercury, you’d be up for 176 Earth days…you’d need a LOT of coffee! 

Two missions have visited Mercury:

Mariner 10 was the first mission to Mercury, and 30 years later, our MESSENGER mission was the second to visit the planet. Mariner 10 was also the first spacecraft to reach one planet by using the gravity of another planet (in this case, Venus) to alter its speed and trajectory.

MESSENGER was the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury, The spacecraft had its own shades to protect it from the light of the sun. This is important since sunlight on Mercury can be as much as 11 times brighter than it is here on Earth. The spacecraft was originally planned to orbit Mercury for one year, but exceeded expectations and worked for over four years capturing extensive data. On April 30, 2015, the spacecraft succumbed to the pull of solar gravity and impacted Mercury’s surface.

Water Ice?

The MESSENGER spacecraft observed compelling support for the long-held hypothesis that Mercury harbors abundant water ice and other frozen volatile materials in its permanently shadowed polar craters.

This radar image of Mercury’s north polar region. The areas shown in red were captured by MESSENGER, compared to the yellow deposits imaged by Earth-based radar. These areas are believed to consist of water ice.

Mercury Transit of the Sun

For more than seven hours on Monday, May 9, Mercury will be visible as a tiny black dot crossing the face of the sun. This rare event – which happens only slightly more than once a decade – is called a transit.

Where: Skywatchers in Western Europe, South America and eastern North America will be able to see the entirety of the transit. The entire 7.5-hour path across the sun will be visible across the Eastern U.S. – with magnification and proper solar filters – while those in the West can observe the transit in progress at sunrise.

Watch: We will stream a live program on NASA TV and the agency’s Facebook page from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. – an informal roundtable during which experts representing planetary, heliophysics and astrophysics will discuss the science behind the Mercury transit. Viewers can ask questions via Facebook and Twitter using #AskNASA. Unlike the 2012 Venus transit of the sun, Mercury is too small to be visible without magnification from a telescope or high-powered binoculars. Both must have safe solar filters made of specially-coated glass or Mylar; you can never look directly at the sun.

To learn more about our solar system and the planets, visit: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

my hair really grew lol been natural since January 2012. Didn’t transition. My hair was shaved on the back & sides and was short on top & I just let it grow out.

VOICE TRANSITION (2012-1015)
Perrie Edwards
VOICE TRANSITION (2012-1015)

- Perrie’s voice change throughout nearly 3 years & 2 years of having her tonsils removed.

FIRST AUDIO is DNA studio from Oct. 2012

SECOND AUDIO is DNA from the X-Factor Nov. 2012

THIRD AUDIO is DNA from GMA – posted Jun. 2013, ( 6 months after surgery)

FOURTH AUDIO is DNA from Jingle Bell Ball – posted Dec.2013 (11 months after surgery)

FIFTH AUDIO is DNA from the Salute Tour in Bournemouth on Apr. 2014 (15 months after surgery)

SIXTH & FINAL AUDIO is DNA from MTV Crashes Plymouth – posted Aug. 2015 (29 months after surgery)

5

Aaron Hegert, Transition/Template for Transition, (2012)

-From the Artist Statement

Transition/Template for Transition, an ongoing project, is an attempt to actively explore the flux and shift of particular spaces from their intended uses, to the secondary, more devious, forms of use that are hidden in their utilization. I want to access a certain mode of “making” that is more akin to consumption than it is to production. To begin, I took an explicit example of clandestine spatial consumption, a concrete ramp (transition) illegally built by local skateboarders in a derelict business park, and the wooden template for that transition, found on site, as subject matter for my photographs. These objects, and the perception that preceded their becoming, act as a blunt edged metaphor for a more general inquiry into the practice of catalyzing a space that is characteristically vulnerable: a space that is vulnerable to multiple associations; to manipulation by users who are not its maker; to a push from what it is, to what you want it to be.

During the progression of the project, I have looked at these subjects both in and out of context, both as documents of, and models for, a critical spatial practice. And though I have integrated some environmental details and some experiments influenced by these observations, I have returned to the original transition and template repeatedly because of the simplicity of their formal and material qualities, and the complexity of the spatial and perceptual shifts they mobilize.