2004 problems

Jay-Z, photographed in the legendary Beat Street Records during the shooting of his “99 Problems” music video, by director Mark Romanek in March 2004. Hov had a long history with the store, with it being one of the first places to carry his early singles.

Hov wanted the “99 Problems” video to be as auto-biographical as the rest of The Black Album, helping to paint the portrait of where and how he grew up. In a conversation with Romanek he told him he wanted the video to “make a pissy wall look like art.” The task was originally intended to be undertaken by Quentin Tarantino, however during the planning stages Rick Rubin suggested that Hov offer the job to Romanek.

Due to the research and influence of Romanek and cinematographer Joaquin Baca Asay the video borrows visual characteristics from many New York street photographers, including Martin Dixon and Eugene Richards. The video was shot entirely on black-and-white film. Utilizing broken clips of footage captured in Brooklyn’s Marcy housing project, Hov and Romanek created an effective portrait of urban life. Somewhere between the almost photographic imagery and the rapid montage of cinematic movement, Romanek manages to convey Jay’s development and monumentalize his Marcy roots as well as the nature of the projects themselves.

 The video’s final scene, which depicts Jay being sprayed with bullets, was inspired by the ending of the classic 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde. “I’ve always wanted to do a ‘Bonnie and Clyde’-type of scene for a music video, but no one had the guts to let me do it until Jay-Z came along,” Romanek revealed to MTV News. “Jay was a little unsure about it at first, because that sort of imagery has a lot of real-life baggage attached to it in the rap world, but I explained to Jay that it was meant to be more abstract, that it wasn’t meant to be taken literally. He finally decided to trust me and I think he really liked the way it came out.” Hov added: “As far as me getting shot, I just looked at it the same way I would watch Denzel [Washington] in 'Training Day,’ or seeing any other actor, you know? I was just acting out a part. I was trying to show Hollywood I got some chops, too. Maybe I’ll get a little job.”

MTV refused to air the clip before 6 p.m. and asked ask Romanek to edit about ten scenes in the video, but Jay agreed to only blur certain images: "We’re not interested in what MTV likes or doesn’t like. If you make something good enough, MTV will want to show it.” Hov has jokingly said he felt like Madonna at the time, relating to the controversies that surrounded many of her music videos.

In a later interview Romanek would sing the praises of the rapper: “Jay is a gentleman—cool, hardworking, and really funny. This was a longer shoot than he was used to and he sometimes complained (in a totally light-hearted way) that I was forcing him walk all over Brooklyn. But, I think he knew we were making something a little special and that since it was his last video, he was willing to put in the extra work. I think he has similar perfectionist tendencies so, he understood my process and the focus I put on trying to get that extra effort out of him and everyone on the crew.”

Pop punk problem #23
  • <p> <b>Dumb bitch:</b> "Omg I'm so pop punk."<p/><b>Me:</b> "you heard one Blink-182 song 4 years ago, One Direction is your top played artist on your phone and you thought Nirvana was a clothing brand... Now tell me, what part of you is pop punk?"<p/><b>Dumb bitch:</b> "..."<p/></p>
2

Why are conservatives afraid of Neil deGrasse Tyson?

I really liked some of the points made in this article save for the Bill Maher’s comment, didn’t really need it. But the general point made about a scientifically literate public bringing a political fallout was spot on.

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson has been the recipient of a seemingly bizarre political backlash — after the conservative magazine National Review penned a takedown cover story on the “Cosmos” host last week depicting him as a smug, intellectual bully.

The story struck many as odd given Tyson’s gentle, geeky presentation style. Comedian Bill Maher had Tyson on his HBO show over the weekend, trying to make sense of the backlash.

“You’re a scientist, and a black one, who’s smarter than [conservatives] are,” Maher quipped.

The line got laughs, but it’s worth remembering that Tyson served the George W. Bush administration as a member of the Commission on Moon, Mars and Beyond in 2004. Conservatives have no problem harnessing Tyson’s intellect.

No, the danger Tyson brings to the political structure, as he gains an increasingly large foothold in the popular culture, is the threat of an informed populace.

“When you’re scientifically literate, the world looks different to you,” Tyson wrote in 2011. “It’s a particular way of questioning what you see and hear. When empowered by this state of mind, objective realities matter. These are the truths of the world that exist outside of whatever your belief system tells you.”

That may not sound radical, but the promise of a large, nerdy, young voting block that subscribes to Tyson’s sentiment is a threat to the political status quo — certainly Republicans, but Democrats as well.

Imagine if millions of young Tyson fans stopped searching for facts to confirm their personal biases, or ceased prioritizing using their education to leverage personal wealth, and instead sought the most sound solutions to identifiable problems for the betterment of the species. If the rising generation of young voters actually starts demanding rational, evidence-guided leadership, few in our current crop of elected officials would survive the political fallout.

Consider this: In 1995, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment — a nonpartisan panel of scientists and researchers assembled to offer objective technical guidance to Congress on scientifically complex issues — was stripped of all funding, effectively shutting it down. (Officially, it still exists on paper.) It has remained unfunded ever since. (Thanks, Newt Gingrich.) An attempt in May to provide a paltry $2.5 million to the office was stymied by House Republicans.

In a world where advanced technology has infiltrated nearly every corner of our lives — raising a litany of technical, ethical and legal challenges — our government is willfully scientifically illiterate.

The reason this status quo has been allowed to persist is that the general population isn’t much better. Conservatives continue to fight any attempts to combat climate change, while many liberals are refusing to vaccinate their children over fears of a nonexistent link to autism. It wouldn’t be hard to predict a liberal backlash against Tyson, similar to the one we’re seeing from conservatives, if he were to speak more prominently about his endorsement of genetically modified foods — one of the more scientifically unfounded banner arguments of the left.

Tyson is a threat to this cone of ignorance and self-interest. He’s a champion of knowledge and the human potential. He brings the fundamental belief that our species is destined for something greater than the interminable squabble between self-interested individuals and rival nations and dwindling resources — that our collective efforts can be applied to the pursuit of knowledge, ultimately paving the way for our exploration of the galaxy.

That’s a vision people can get behind. It’s also one that could potentially upend everything we know.

How do you feel about some of the more excitable female fans at your gigs? You had a few offers at your Bedford Esquires show on 11 March 2004.
“I did! The problem about these offers is that they were during a show and there wasn’t an awful lot I could do about them. I’ve never been told that before and I think I feigned being shocked quite well. It was quite forward of this young lady but it was very nice to hear as well, in a perverse way.
"What did she say? She said, "I want to suck your dick”. It was really loud and the whole venue heard. It was during a quiet bit in between songs when I was stuttering for something to say and, of course, I stuttered even more after that.
—  Graham, Q Magazine, June 2004
MUNCHFLIX: LOVE NEVER DIES

IMDB BLURB: Having relocated to a vivacious amusement resort in Coney Island, The Phantom of the Paris Opera House uses a pseudonym to invite renowned soprano Christine Daaé to perform. She and her husband Raoul have no idea what lies in store.

WARNINGS: Mutha fuckin’ SPACE EELS. Ben Lewis is an anaconda. There is a murder in the film but there is literally no blood. Attempted suicide. Love angles abound. 

RATING: My anaconda don’t want none unless you got a son, hon.

OBLIGATORY DISCLAIMER: All reviews are done solely for humor and should not be taken seriously ever. If you cannot handle cursing, crude humor and probably some offensive things, pls do not read this.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

we pay reparations to first nations people already

We’re not done. Not even close.

If we were done, FNMI people in Canada would have equal opportunities and the same access to healthcare and education. If we were done First Nations men and women wouldn’t be murdered at a rate of 5-8X the non-indigenous rate. If we were done, we wouldn’t have a national crisis surrounding missing and murdered indigenous women. If we were done First Nations communities would have the same quality of life as non-indigenous Canadians:

…[In] the United Nations’ Human Development Index, an international measure of quality of life, Canada ranked eighth, between the U.S. and Japan. The Inuit population, meanwhile, ranked 63rd, slightly better than Libya, while First Nations reserve communities ranked 72nd, on par with Romania. 

If we were done clean drinking water would be available in every community in Canada:

Two-thirds of all First Nation communities in Canada have been under at least one drinking water advisory at some time in the last decade, a CBC News investigation has revealed. The numbers show that 400 out of 618 First Nations in the country had some kind of water problem between 2004 and 2014. 

Canada implemented policies of cultural genocide with the Residential School system until the 1990′s. We didn’t apologize for this until 2008. We never apologized for the 60′s scoop. Its only in 2015 that the truth and reconciliation commission on Residential Schools even happened.

Jay-Z, photographed on the Brooklyn Bridge during the shooting of his “99 Problems” video by director Mark Romanek in March 2004.

Hov wanted the video to be as auto-biographical as the rest of The Black Album, painting a portrait of where and how he grew up. In a conversation with Romanek he told him he wanted the video to “make a pissy wall look like art.” The task was originally intended to be undertaken by Quentin Tarantino, however Rick Rubin suggested that Hov offer the job to Romanek.

Due to the research and influence of Romanek and the video’s cinematographer, Joaquin Baca Asay, the video borrows visual characteristics from many New York street photographers, including Martin Dixon and Eugene Richards. The video was shot entirely on black-and-white film.

Utilizing broken clips of footage captured in Brooklyn’s Marcy housing project, Hov and Romanek created an effective portrait of urban life. Somewhere between the almost photographic imagery and the rapid montage of cinematic movement, Romanek manages to convey Jay’s development and monumentalize his Marcy roots as well as the nature of the projects themselves.

“Jay is a gentleman - cool, hardworking, and really funny. This was a longer shoot than he was used to and he sometimes complained (in a totally light-hearted way) that I was forcing him walk all over Brooklyn. But, I think he knew we were making something a little special and that since it was his last video, he was willing to put in the extra work. I think he has similar perfectionist tendencies so, he understood my process and the focus I put on trying to get that extra effort out of him and everyone on the crew.”

I remember when I was younger I was absolutely obsessed with Hilary Duff, I met her twice, I had a bunch of merchandise and everything. Then when she came out with her song “Wake Up” and she said “There’s people talking, they talk about me. They know my name they think they know everything but they don’t know anything about me” I got so mad and stopped liking her because i was really hurt she would say I don’t know anything about her when I had her video now DVD called “Hilary Duff: A Day in My Life” and I thought she told me everything about her. I was pissed