1st point

5

A Year in Review [2016]: Favorite Characters

1. AoY Girls - Jeong Ye Eun, Song Ji Won, Yoon Jin Myeong, Yoo Eun Jae, Kang Yi Na (Age of Youth)

D&D: How to Use Character Arcs as a Dungeon Master

In my previous post on character arcs, I talked about how a player should determine how they want their character’s arc to begin and end. It was from a player’s perspective. But how does a DM write an adventure that will make that player’s arc happen?

First, get the information you need. Ask your players to each determine how their characters will begin the campaign and how they want them to change by the end of it. Then ask for copies of their character’s traits, flaws, ideals, and bonds. Note whether a player’s character is going to die tragically and if they are okay with that. With this information, you can give the players what I call a moral quandary, personalized for their own character’s arc. A moral quandary is giving the player two difficult options that the player must decide how their character would choose. The character should lean to one side of a moral quandary at the beginning of an adventure, but gradually start to lean the other way as their arc comes to completion. 

For instance, a cleric might be presented with a choice to kill an evildoer or merely capture them. If the cleric is heading down an arc where their ideal changes from “all life is precious” to “evil must be stopped at all costs” in their character arc is going to make very different choices in that situation depending on where they are on their arc.

Let’s figure out how we can use this info as a DM and where to put moral quandaries using a 9-point story structure. These are not an entire campaign, but you can use each point as a fixed point in the narrative; a story outline based on the characters’ arcs. Plenty of different stuff can happen between each point, but the points must happen to create a robust story.

Call to Action

The player is given an initial call to action. Essentially, a moral quandary disguised as a quest hook. Try to have a separate but related call to action for each player. Ideally, the players should refuse the call to action, as they haven’t been “changed” yet. If they play to their characters’ initial backgrounds and traits, they will refuse the call. You can even enforce this by loading your call with descriptions of how the character is feeling. “You are offended that someone would even offer something so morally reprehensible to you, despite the fact that you could use the money.”

A good-hearted rogue is starting a tragic fall arc and is offered a chance to make millions from some morally questionable actions involving an evil regime, but decides it is wrong. An innocent paladin starting a coming of age arc could be offered a chance to rise against an evil regime, but values their own safety. A studious apprentice wizard starting a corruption arc is offered power in exchange for service to an evil regime, but decides they can get power on their own.

Inciting Incident

Something happens to force the player to action, whether they are ready or not. Try to come up with an inciting incident that involves all of the players, not just one. The inciting incident can act as where the adventuring party finally meets.

The evil regime in the Call to Action ends up invading the players’ quiet suburb to enforce martial law. The players escape or fight back or else they and their loved ones die or are enslaved. The rogue decides to run from their debts by joining the party. The paladin has seen firsthand what the regime can do, and will now join the party to find someone else who can help them stop it. The wizard seeks out more power to stop the regime.

1st Plot Point

The players learn the first shreds of information about the overarching narrative of the campaign. After the inciting incident, some characters might not be convinced and want to turn back. This gives them a reason to continue onward together, as a team. There should be no turning back from the 1st plot point.

Players learn how this evil regime has been spreading across the kingdom. It still holds many mysteries, but its power is great and threatening. Its power is centered in a capital city, which the players now opt to travel to in order to find the things they currently desire.

1st Pinch Point

A pinch point is the first real display of power from the antagonist or opposing force. In D&D this should be actual combat, though it doesn’t have to be. As long as the players see firsthand what the antagonist can do to their characters, this part will add the tension/drama that it should. If you want to have a 1st Pinch Point for each character, then this display of force should directly target the player’s character arc and spark the desire to change through a moral quandary. It’s an awakening. Create tension by ending a session with this pinch point.

The players come across a thieves’ guild run by the evil regime. The rogue takes note of how rich, glamorous, and lawless the life of a criminal is to spark their tragic fall arc. The paladin realizes how deep the corruption of the world runs and sparks their coming of age arc as their innocence starts to fade. The wizard realizes how much resources the evil regime has, and wonders what sorts of power they had in mind for him sparking their corruption arc.

Midpoint

More info is revealed about the antagonist and the perception of the characters change. They have an epiphany and decide to continue onward through their arc. This can, and most likely will, happen at different times for each character and their varying arcs.

The players learn about the leader of the regime. They have been pushed to the breaking point by the regime’s forces. The rogue decides join the regime and start doing crime for the regime and acting as a double agent against the party. The paladin no longer cares about finding someone else to help them stop the regime, vowing to end it themselves. The wizard gets an unholy tome and decides to learn how to make a pact with the demon the regime mentioned to overpower the regime. They are all still heading to the capital, though now with severely divergent goals.

2nd Pinch Point

The antagonist reveals their full power and threatens the completion of the characters’ arcs. The entire party should, in general, be at their lowest moment and completely without hope. This should happen at the same time for everyone. Ideally, end a session with this pinch point to create a cliffhanger and highlight the hopelessness.

The players reach the capital of the evil regime. The rogue is faced with a moral test, where they will be offered riches and allowed to live if they rat out their adventuring party. They choose to take the offer and are betrayed by the regime’s leader and sentenced to death anyway. The paladin comes face to face with the regime’s leader after being ratted out by the rogue. They fail the encounter and barely manage to escape with their life. The wizard is also defeated and their unholy tome is destroyed in the battle. The rogue is imprisoned and the paladin and rogue escape the leader and are being hunted in the capital.

2nd Plot Point

The last piece of the puzzle has come together in the second plot point. The characters finish their arc and learn how to overcome the antagonist. This can happen at different points and doesn’t have to happen quickly. For a tragic character, this is the part where they finally meet their end. Tragic characters fail to change or their change is self-destructive and they fail to overcome the antagonist of the story (tragic, isn’t it?). Think of this part as a moral quandary that characters’ finally “know the answer” to, as far as their character arc is concerned.

The rogue tries to escape, succeeds, but heads back to the thieves’ guild instead of his adventuring allies, and they ultimately betray and kill him. The paladin’s innocence is shattered and they gather rebel forces over time to take on the regime’s leader, becoming a leader themselves. They also find an unlikely ally in the wizard, who has finally succumbed to evil. The wizard still doesn’t know how to summon the demon, but they have already gotten a taste of evil’s power by performing vile rituals on captured regime members and will now use their power for vengeance against the regime’s leader.

Climax

The characters finally face off with the antagonist. The promise set out at the beginning of the campaign is fulfilled. The characters, having completed their arcs, are now changed enough to be able to defeat the antagonist. This should be the players at their most powerful and should be the most epic battle to take place in the campaign.

The paladin’s rebel army and the wizard’s evil magic face off against the evil regime’s leader. The battle is long and epic, but the characters succeed, freeing the kingdom of the evil regime.

Resolution

The game shouldn’t abruptly end after the antagonist is defeated! There needs to be closure. The players’ characters find out the results and the aftermath of defeating the antagonist, for better or for worse. In the case of an ongoing game, you should now set up the next campaign here.

The paladin and wizard regard each other as unsteady allies who no longer have a common enemy. The wizard seeks more power, even seeking to possibly usurp the void of power left from the regime’s defeat. The paladin and their rebel army gather in defiance of the wizard. The paladin tells the wizard to leave the kingdom and not threaten anyone with their evil, else the paladin will smite them down. The wizard, not having many spells left after the battle and not being ready to face an entire army, teleports away to parts unknown with a puff of green smoke. The paladin is placed in power, and the wizard now acts as a looming threat. Perhaps an NPC and villain for the next campaign?


This character arc outline is not cut-and-dry. You should use it as a guide, not a rule. Some characters might abruptly choose to change. Some will reach different parts of the outline at different times or out of order. Some characters might waffle between two sides of their arc before deciding which side they want to be on. But the more you talk to your players about it, the easier it is to come up with a generalized plan for your campaign’s story. Heck, your story might even change from what you initially intended by the end of it (a character with a bad roll can still end up dying before even finishing their arc!) But hopefully this will aid you in making the players love their characters even more and have fun as they grow and change in your campaign’s world. That’s what it’s all about, after all.

anonymous asked:

My story has six main characters, all of equal importance, and so I'm having trouble deciding on what to do with the POV. Any advice for this situation?

Point of View

We rarely get POV questions so thanks anon! I love point of view, so I’m excited to talk about this. Here are some considerations you should make if you’ve got lots of characters and you’re stumped on how to handle their perspectives. 

For our other followers: if you’re not familiar with POV and different POV types, read through this article to give you some basic knowledge. Also, here are our two posts on writing multiple perspectives for some additional information.

Multiple Points of View

Let’s Talk About POV

1. First person vs. third person

It might be instinct to think that you can’t use first person perspective when you have more than one POV character, but that’s simply not true! My favorite ones to cite (as I do in one of the previous posts) is Legend by Marie Lu and The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver.

What’s tricky about using many first person POVs (in this case, you’d be using 6) is that the voice of each character may get lost. If each voice has only subtle differences, it’s easy for a reader to lose track of whose POV they’re currently reading. Especially if the switches are happening often. Even if you provide headings that identify the character, you want voices that are distinct. The flip side of that is if you’re attempting to write voices that are too different with that many characters, you might end up writing caricatures or archetypes that are only different to be different, and you lose the authenticity.

Voice is important with first person point of view. If the idea of developing a unique voice for each of the six characters sounds daunting or uninteresting, then third person perspective might be more your speed.   

2. Multiple third person POVs

You might think that third person is simple in this case. Because you’re not using I/me/mine pronouns, then you’re really not using one character’s perspective, right? Point of view becomes inconsequential, right?

Actually, no that’s not right at all! When you read a novel that is written from the third person POV, it’s more than likely the limited third person. It can be hard to recognize, but the easiest way to think about limited third is that it’s first person where the I/me/mine pronouns are just replaced with she/her/hers (or whichever gender). You’re still only seeing one character’s perspective, but you’re slightly more distant. Instead of the story being told from the character’s perspective, it’s told from the perspective of someone that’s able to read this character’s mind, and only this character’s mind. 

So when it comes to the perspective the story’s told from, third person limited and first person aren’t that far off from each other. Since we’ve determined that you can use more than one first person perspective in a novel, you can also use more than one limited third person perspective. 

The advantage of using third person over first person when you’re going to be switching perspectives between many characters, is that you can use the character’s names frequently, so a reader won’t get lost with two many “I” narrators. 

No matter how many characters I’m using, this is my personal favorite, but each writer has their own preferences. When you’re choosing between first and third, use the one that appeals to you the most. You can probably make it work either way. 

3. Omniscient Third Person

You also might choose to go the third person omniscient route, where you’re able to see into any of your characters’ heads at any one time. With third person limited, it’s common to choose one character’s perspective per scene/chapter, but with third person omniscient, you could move from one character’s head to another in a matter of sentences. 

Here’s an example from Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott.

‘…We can’t do much, but we can make our little sacrifices, and ought to do it gladly. But I am afraid I don’t.’ And Meg shook her head, as she thought regretfully of all the pretty things she wanted. 

‘But I don’t think the little we should spend would do any good. We’ve each got a dollar, and the army wouldn’t be much helped by our giving that. I agree not to expect anything from Mother or you, but I do want to buy UNDINE AND SINTRAM for myself. I’ve wanted it so long,’ said Jo, who was a bookworm. 

‘I planned to spend mine in new music,’ said Beth, with a little sigh, which no one heard but the hearth brush and kettle holder. 

The first bolded sentence shows Meg’s perspective, as she is thinking of all the pretty things she wants, and no one else could know that but her. Then, just a couple paragraphs later in the second bolded sentence, we’re no longer in Meg’s head, since no one (including Meg) heard what Beth said. This is a narrator that clearly is able to perceive all perspectives all the time. 

What this means is that you can show what each character is thinking in every scene, rather than addressing only one character per scene or per chapter. 

4. Choosing What’s Right

While it’s true that some stories are told more effectively with one perspective than another, it’s also important that you choose something you feel comfortable tackling. A writer that writes from first person as their default might struggle to draft a story using third person omniscient. 

It’s good to challenge yourself, especially if you feel your POV choice is important for your story, but there are times when it’s more important to get the story written than to push your limits. Any POV you choose can work, so try it out with whichever POV is natural for you. 

Point of view is one of those things that you will be dealing with in just about every sentence you write, so it’s crucial that you feel comfortable with it. Experimentation is good, but if you can’t settle into the perspective you choose, you’ll constantly feel like you’re writing someone else’s novel and not your own.

Good luck with your POV decision!

-Rebekah

Narrative Voice

Narrative voice is one of those things editors and agents look out for as a sign of raw talent. It’s something people say can’t be taught. Either you have it or you don’t. 

This may be true, partly, but it doesn’t mean that you can’t make any conscious decisions about your narrative voice. 

I love playing around with my voice in different pieces that I write, and I thought I would share some advice on how you could have some fun with your own narrative voice as well. 

I would argue that in most novels, about 50% of voice comes from the author’s own voice and natural storytelling abilities. This may change overtime, but mostly it’s just you. Writing as you write. The other 50%, I’d say comes down to writing like your narrator is telling a story to an audience. This means asking yourself two questions.

1. WHO IS TELLING THE STORY?

This is pretty simple in 1st person point of view: know who your character is and let them tell the story. Know what their opinions are. What interests them. The things they like and dislike. If they’re angry or optimistic or scared. If they use slang or speak like a professor. A voice should grow naturally out of that information. 

In 3rd person, when your narrator is a non-participant, there are two options:

The first is to tell the story strictly as yourself, in 100% your own voice, and let it change naturally as you suit it to fit your story. This means being confident in your abilities as a storyteller and just telling the story. 

The other option is to put on a costume. This narrator is you, but perhaps it is you as a grandfather, or you as a historian, or simply of yourself as someone funnier or wittier than you think you actually are. It’s still your voice. It’s still you telling the story, but you’re drawing out a particular aspect of your voice that enhances the story you’re telling

This option is more complicated than the others. This is consciously changing your voice. I believe it can be done: that grandfather might help you get into a certain mindset if you want your story to have that kindly touch of “Mr. and Mrs. Dursley of Number 4 Privet Drive were proud to say…” Thinking of yourself as a historian might add a formal sort of flare to your high fantasy novel. Believing you’re hilarious may give you the confidence to put sillier elements into your story.

2. WHO ARE THEY TELLING IT TO?

I don’t mean this in terms of who you imagine is going to read your book. That’s a different matter entirely. What I’m talking about here is the narrator’s audience. This is usually just an audience imagined by the author, unless the format of the novel is epistolary or journal entry, or the narrator references them outright. Even so, it can be helpful to remember, however, that every story is told to someone. This can be intentional or unintentional, but it drastically changes how the story is told. 

Here are some types of audiences:

  • A friend, which means they’re telling the story in an honest and casual manner, as though the reader is someone they trust with their innermost thoughts. I would say this is the most common “audience” for a novel told in the 1st person.
    • ex. The Shades of London series by Maureen Johnson
  • Someone they want to persuade, which depending on their character could mean being unreliable and defensive, or confessional and apologetic. They might be keeping a few secrets about their thoughts and feelings from the reader, and maybe even lying to the reader and/or themselves
    • ex. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
  • Historical record, which is not actually for historical record, but a more formal 3rd person that doesn’t focus on interacting with the reader so much as honestly reporting thoughts and events as they occur. I would say that this is one of the most common “audiences” for a novel written in 3rd person.
    • ex. A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
  • An audience referenced in the text itself. This is a book in full story-telling mode, where a 3rd person narrator both refers to the imagined audience and the fact that they are telling a story directly on the page. This is an older style of storytelling used to be more common than it is today. The imagined audience can be a certain type of reader (children in many classic children’s books). It can also be an audience that only exists in the word of the story itself, like prospective dragon naturalists. 
    • ex. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien 
    • ex. A Natural History of Dragons by Marie Brennan

Once you’ve settled these two matters, you have a structure for your narrative voice in place. The rest, depends on your voice as an author, and for that I can only give the following advice:

  1. Read. Pay close attention to the voices of the books you admire, the way the narrative interacts with you as a reader and with the events of the text. Consider why you admire certain storytelling features and how you might implement similar features in your own writing. 
  2. Write and write a lot. Every word you put on the page is a choice you’ve made. Every choice you make will hone your voice, completely subconsciously. 
  3. Have fun telling your story. Don’t worry about the voice being polished or “good,” just tell the story in a way that’s enjoyable for you. If you’d like, experiment with different styles. Practice telling stories in the voices of people who don’t sound exactly like you. Try on ridiculous costumes. When you have fun telling a story, your reader will have fun listening to it. 

anonymous asked:

Any tips on how to make a non-POV character (who will become important later on) likeable to the reader, even when other characters tend to find them irritating?

Excellent question!

Now, because we are viewing your world from a POV Character(s) perspective, I am going to assume you have written using either First Person, Third Person Limited, or Third Person Multiple. Any of them are perfectly fine to use and I will elaborate on how to shift the reader’s opinion of the non-POV Character with all three.

(POV= Point of view)

First Person:

It is important to remember that when First Person is in use, the POV Character is telling the story. Therefore, your reader’s emotions are closely tied to your POV Character. In First Person, if your character dislikes someone, your reader will too. This is called an “unreliable narrator” because your reader is only receiving one POV and therefore trusts that character.

So, how do we change your reader’s opinion? There are two options (that I could think of):

  1. Change Your Character’s Opinion- As people grow and change, sometimes we realize that things we found irritating or annoying, no longer bother us. It is possible that in your characters’ growth your POV Character no longer finds non-POV irritating or that non-POV grew out of irritating phase of life. This is something you would need to carefully plan in your plot and character arcs but, it is doable.
  2. Insert Another Character’s Thoughts- Just because you only have one POV character does not mean that your reader needs to only hear their opinion. Your character will have friends and family that he/she will converse with regular. In a conversation, you can easily slip in a comment about how your character finds non-POV annoying, but that it is only your character’s problem; everyone else likes non-POV. This is fairly easy to do and any blunt friend or mother character would probably tell them to stop complaining about non-POV.

Third Person Limited:

In many ways Third Person Limited is similar to First Person but, a narrator is telling the story of one POV Character. Your reader’s emotions and thoughts are still closely connected to your POV Character’s emotions but because you have a narrator, there is a slight disconnect. You can use this disconnect to your advantage and change your reader’s opinion of the irritating non-POV.

  1. Narrator Shares More- Because your narrator is telling the story of your character, they can share personal tidbits of information that the character does not share, but that would be helpful to the reader. In the case of your POV and annoying non-POV characters, your narrator could casually mention how the POV Character has always said that the non-POV character is irritating because of (blank), but that they secretly find non-POV quirky and funny.
  2. Narrator Tells More- In the same way that the narrator shares personal thoughts or opinions casually, the narrator can also casually tell more information about the situation. Your PoV Character finds non-POV to be annoying and irritating to be around, but the narrator tells the reader that it is because they remind the POV Character of their sibling that has gone missing.

Third Person Multiple:

This POV in writing is probably the most common because it is the easiest to work with. Third Person Multiple is when more than one character’s perspective is written and the author switches between characters to give the readers a broader perspective. The reader’s emotions are not necessarily tied down like they are with First Person and they are not relying on the narrator as heavily like with Third Person Limited. It is therefore, fairly easy to drop hints that your non-POV character isn’t as annoying as your POV Characters say they are.

  1. Observation from a Far- Your reader is observing everything through the eyes of multiple characters. So, it is natural that the characters see things differently. For example, one of the POV Characters can observe how pleasant non-POV is being at a certain time. Your reader will catch the hint (whether they realize it or not) and slowly begin to reconsider non-POV’s personality as someone likable. Note: For this to work, hints must be dropped occasionally and in different circumstances, by different people.
  2. Introductions with Credentials- Your reader is aware of who your non-POV character is but because they are now entering the cast a bit more, it may be necessary to briefly introduce them again. Only, this time when you introduce them, have them hand in their qualifications, i.e. why non-POV is needed here. Readers tend to be a bit more accepting when they understand why a character is needed. If they need non-POV because he/she is the only one who can help them open the vault to get the special key to save the world, no matter how annoying non-POV is, your reader will understand.

Hopefully all of this was helpful and shed some light on how to work with non-POV characters. They can be very difficult characters to integrate into a story, but don’t stress about it. Just observe people and consider your characters’ personalities.

Happy writing!

-Mia

Yuri on Ice BD booklet translation (with Jun Shishido & Yuusuke Tannawa interview) - Volume 4

The full translation of the booklet of vol.4 is finally done… Actually, one of the reasons it took me so long is that I spent most of the time I was home from Thursday to Sunday watching Fuji TV’s live coverage of the World Championships, lol. And I’m glad I did because it was really exciting. It does make a difference to watch it live without knowing the results… I will work on the audio commentary and choreography part in the next few days, and hopefully on other stuff too.

The booklet has 3 parts:
1) Character introduction for Phichit, Chris and Guang-Hong.
2) “Topics”, in other words random curiosities. 
3) Interview with chief director Jun Shishido and screen designer Yuusuke Tannawa. Most of you will probably have no idea who they are (and their titles are by no means a good explanation of what their actual role was), but I really recommend reading this interview because it gives more insight on the creation process of YOI and maybe it helps understand how hard it is to animate figure skating. The parts in round brackets are exactly like they are in the original text, it’s not something I added.

***If you wish to share this translation please do it by reblogging or posting a link to it***

***Re-translating into other languages is ok but please mention that this post is the source***


He’s going to leave a mark in Thai’s skating history with his blades!

Phichit Chulanont
voiced by Kenshou Ono

Profile
Date of birth: April 30th, 20 years old
Height: 165 cm
Blood type: B
Thai

Introduction
A new hope for Thailand, that didn’t have any skaters who got remarkable results. His popularity is quickly growing also thanks to his spontaneous and pleasant skating style that mirrors his friendly personality. This season he is skating both his short program and free to songs from the movie “The King and the Skater”, which is something he had always dreamed of doing. He is the first Thai skater to have succeeded in a quadruple jump and he also obtained his first Grand Prix victory. He is continuing to rewrite Thai’s figure skating history.
He used to train under Celestino in Detroit, but from this season he has moved his base back to Thailand. He loves hamsters and has a lot of them. Posts about them can be seen on his SNS.

The lethal weapon made of sex appeal that shines on the ice.

Christophe Giacometti
voiced by Hiroki Yasumoto

Profile
Date of birth: February 14th, 25 years old
Height: 183 cm
Blood type: undisclosed
Swiss

Introduction
10 years since he moved to the senior class, he is one of the world’s best skaters fighting for the top. Beside his quadruple Lutz and his characteristic sexy moves, he is also praised for his unique and precise spins. As a veteran, he never breaks down too much, but he is a slow starter and tends to not perform at his best in the Grand Prix series, which is held in the first half of the season. Last year he came in 2nd in both the Grand Prix Final and the World Championships. With his long-time rival Nikiforov missing this season, he is one of the candidates to snatch the king’s throne.
He is a popular skater who captures the hearts of women all over the world with his passionate and alluring performances that ooze the sex appeal of a grown-up man. He has a cat.

To become, one day, China’s hero.

Guang-Hong Ji
voiced by Yuutarou Honjou

Profile
Date of birth: January 7th, 17 years old
Height: 160 cm
Blood type: O
Chinese

Introduction
A growing 17-years-old who moved to the senior class this season. In the Grand Prix’s America tournament he placed 3rd, achieving the amazing feat of standing on the podium on his debut performance. The success rate of his quadruple jumps, which he started training for this season, is also high, and as China’s new ace he is expected to grow further in the second half of the season.
He has a shy personality, but at the same time he also uploads many selfies on the SNS. It seems that he also bought a lot of clothes during his training camp in Canada. Together with his friend Chulanont from Thailand and Japan’s Minami, he is called by fans “one of Asia’s 3 cutest skaters”.

YURI!!!’s TOPIC

TOPIC 1: Grand Prix Series
It consists in a total of 7 tournaments: 6 tournaments held in different countries every year from the end of October to the end of November, and the final that sees the 6 skaters who got the highest scores in the other tournaments as its participants. The 6 tournaments are always held in the same countries (the order may vary), but the location of the final changes every year, and this season it’s Barcelona in Spain. The participants are chosen based on their results in tournaments regulated by ISU (International Skating Union), their world ranking, recommendations by the host country etc.; however, each skater can only participate in a maximum of 2 tournaments. In addition, only up to 3 skaters from the same country can participate in the same category of the same tournament. The period when the skaters’ allocation is announced is somewhat of a festival among skating fans.

*It’s night in Japan when the skaters’ allocation is announced
*The first 6 tournaments are held in 6 countries over the span of 6 weeks
*In every tournament skaters receive points depending on their placement (15 points for the 1st place, 13 points for the 2nd place and so on), and the final ranking decides who will participate in the final

TOPIC 2: Quadruple Jump
(*at the moment of the Russia tournament)
One of the techniques that decide the game in male figure skating is quadruple jumps. Since the number and type of jumps greatly influences the score, recently it’s common for skaters to include multiple quadruple jumps in their programs. However, according to the rules the same jump can only be repeated a limited number of times, therefore skaters try new types of jumps and train hard to be able to have more quadruple jumps to put in their programs. Currently, 5 types of jumps except for the Axel have been successfully landed in official competitions. The one with the highest score is the Lutz, which top skaters such as Victor, Giacometti and JJ are using in their programs. The quadruple toeloop, which has the lowest score, is successfully used by young skaters such as Kenjirou Minami, Guang-Hong and Phichit too. Yuuri can jump the toeloop and Salchow and is currently training to master Victor’s trademark flip. After the Lutz, the flip is the jump with the highest score.

*Yurio in his junior years getting scolded for jumping a quadruple that was not planned
*Seung-gil is the first who successfully landed a quadruple loop
*Emil is a jumper that has 4 quadruples in his free
*JJ jumps an amazing quadruple Lutz in the second half of his program
*Victor uses as his weapons 4 types of quadruples, except for the Axel and loop (in the EX he landed a loop too)

TOPIC 3: Support Item (cheering goods)
It often happens to spot flags and banners used as cheering goods in figure skating venues. After a performance flower bouquets and plushes are also thrown into the rink. Banners do not only feature the skater’s name and flag; sometimes they have a message or a portrait of the skater with which people try to show their support, and in some cases they are even made using photographs. Yuuri is often thrown plushes of food. The bouquets and plushes are picked up by children who are learning skating, usually called “flower girls” and “flower boys”.

*JJ’s cheering group, called JJ girls.
*Yurio’s hardcore fans are called Yuri angels.
*Flags are basic items. Some fans bring different types.
*Present snacks from fans for Yuuri who is on a diet?
*After popular athletes skate the flower girls and boys have a hard time picking up everything
*Sometimes skaters will actually put on the items that are thrown into the rink

TOPIC 4: Kiss & Cry
The kiss & cry is where skaters wait for their score after a performance. The name comes from the fact that it’s a place where athletes can experience both happy and sad feelings. Normally the skater and their coach will sit there, but in some cases there might be people from a country’s federation or the choreographer too. In many venues there will be a microphone, therefore skaters can also send messages to their family and fans. If you listen to the broadcast closely you might be able to hear the athlete and coach reviewing the performance or other conversations.

*Sometimes the coach might strike a pose too
*It’s also a place where athletes vow to make up for a defeat
*”Please support me!” addressed to the viewers
*The JJ style gesture in the kiss & cry is a recurrence
*Michele’s sister Sara can be seen in the kiss & cry too

Chief director / Screen designer
Jun Shishido & Yuusuke Tannawa interview

I want to make the gag scenes dynamic. (Shishido)
The opening of episode 11 was possible thanks to the viewers’ response. (Tannawa)

Shishido: I’m the chief director, but in fact I did a lot of things. Director Yamamoto was too busy, so she mainly did sound and editing, and then since it’s an original story she focused on the story composition…
Tannawa: Shishido-san was like the site supervisor. We would ask things related to the story itself to director Yamamoto, but the one who actually took action and gave directions was Shishido-san. Though in the credits I appear as “screen designer”, the anime’s screen design was created by the director of photography, and my job in this series mainly consisted in creating the footage for PVs, OP etc. and checking the final product before delivery. I started working on the PV at the beginning of 2016. I asked director Yamamoto what kind of layout she had in mind, and decided how to set the visuals of the series. Regarding the contents of the episodes I also discussed with Shishido-san about various topics – for example, “this processing can be done with camerawork, this expression can be recreated with CG” – and shared this information with the involved work groups.

-Trial and error to create the huge amount of skating scenes.-

T: In figure skating athletes perform while continuously moving around, therefore it was extremely difficult to understand where an athlete was and in what direction he was skating in each frame. In the 1st episode we created a CG model of the skater based on the real choreography footage and had it skate in a rink created with 3DCG, then we followed it with tridimensional camerawork and used that footage as a base for the animation. It was a very elaborate process. However, we realized that it was impossible to continue using this method with the production schedule of a TV series, therefore we switched to a different method where we would create camerawork on a general background map. Also, after episode 5, for certain characters we preceded the creation of the key animation with 3DCG. The final animation is all done by hand, but by having a base to use as a reference it was possible to calculate the available time frame and create the animations accordingly, thus shortening the working time.
S: Even if you suddently ask the 3D staff to create figure skating animation, of course they have almost no knowledge of the jumps and techniques. They create the animation based on the reference footage, but they cannot express complex details such as how athletes balance their feet the moment they jump, so for that I and (figure skating animators) Abiko-san and Tatenaka-san adjusted the animation. Among the people working on the series, the only ones who had technical knowledge about figure skating were the 3 of us and director Yamamoto. And it’s not something that you can just explain verbally, so we took on all those jobs ourselves. We checked… everything, probably. Actually, until episode 4 the skating scenes were all created by Abiko-san and Tatenaka-san, so I didn’t need to check them, but from episode 5 the amount of skating scenes became so huge that we asked Tannawa-san and the others whether we could get help from the CG team… I completely trusted Tannawa-san, because I knew that if we explained what to do he would understand what was needed.
T: I basically asked what they couldn’t do, and we did all we could to make up for that and reduce their workload. We would never have finished the series otherwise. That’s why for this anime no one ever said “isn’t that your job?”. For every episode, everyone just fought toward completion.
S: Everyone took responsibility for their job and worked with extreme care, like no one was going to double-check what they did afterwards. We thought, “if we don’t do our best, this series will not make it to the broadcast, therefore we must all be responsible and work hard”…

-A scene you especially paid attention to.-

S: All the storyboards for the skating scenes were drawn by the director, but I drew them for quite a lot of daily life scenes. I especially like the scene where Yurio gives a pirozhki to Yuuri (in episode 9). I was particularly careful to make Yurio look cute. I wanted to show that, even though normally he is rude (to Yuuri), he actually rather trusts him and they do get along. I also like gag scenes, so I had fun with scenes such as the hug competition at the end of episode 9. Gag scenes do not need to be drawn as neatly as serious scenes, therefore I decided to animate them in a very comical and dynamic way.
T: I paid a lot of attention to the opening. The way we changed it in episode 11 to reflect the current story development is something I myself suggested to the director. Actually, only the opening of episode 1 was still incomplete when it was broadcasted. From episode 2 onwards it was always the same footage, but the viewers wrote a lot of comments about it (and were wondering whether it was changing every time). Since everyone was watching it every time without skipping it, we decided to really change it in the end.
S: My favorite character is Georgi Popovich! He’s a man who can talk about love seriously. He actually makes a few appearances since the 1st episode. When we were working on episode 1 we only had Kubo-sensei’s character plans and the storyboard saying “a character named Popovich is standing here”. We made him stand out a little because we understood that he would show up in the story later on. And what a character he was, when he was introduced in episode 6!
T: He was so striking that I was actually shocked! I like Popovich too. Also, among the programs, I like Yuuri’s FS “Yuri on ICE”. It’s the first song I listened to working for this series, and at that time I used it for the PV without knowing that it was going to be Yuuri’s FS. In the PV Yuuri is skating in Hasetsu with his slender appearance from episode 3 onwards, and (the character designer) Hiramatsu-san commented “it’s a wonderful video, but now we have to make him fat”. I remember thinking “what is he saying??” (LOL).

-The power of the support that reached the studio.-

S: When we were creating the anime we were so busy with the work at hand that we didn’t really realize how much of a response the series was having. However, we received lots of presents, food, goods and letters of support from fans.
T: Even items based on the contents of the series, like (retort-packed) borscht. That made us feel that fans were really supporting us because they liked the series, and it boosted our morale. Knowing that there were so many people watching and cheering on us motivated us to our best even it meant working overnight without sleeping.
S: The charm of this series is the love of the original creators, director Yamamoto and Kubo-sensei, that you can feel from it. It’s just so strong.
T: It also feels like you are touring various countries to follow Yuuri and the others and watch their matches. You can watch it with the eyes of a spectator and think “I didn’t know a lot about this athlete, but now I see how he skates”. I think that another element that allows viewers to really get into the world of the series is how not only the matches but also the skaters’ practice scenes and the back yard are drawn with lots of details. Everything is detailed, even the different shape of each skater’s blades. The director herself is full of very sincere love for figure skating, and that was transmitted to both the staff and the viewers.
S: The animation studio had a very nice atmosphere. It’s the first time that I’m working with Tannawa-san, but when I saw his work I realized right away that he was someone I could trust. Trust and unity are something you find in the staff of many series, but for this one it was especially strong.


On a side note, Kubo & Yamamoto went to see the Worlds in Helsinki and are now in St.Petersburg. I am confident it’s tourism but with a spoonful of location hunting… (What a timing, though. I hope none of you or your acquaintances were personally affected by what happened the other day in the subway)

How Planets in the 1st could affect your appearance & personality

*Also check planets conjunct or making a very close aspect to the ascendant* 

Planets in the 1st may add qualities to your personality, first impressions, appearance and how you first see and interact with things along with the aspects that planets and asteroids make to your ascendant. 

For example if somebody is a libra ascendant but their Pluto is in their 1st house, they could be and seem more private than an empty 1st house or unaspected libra rising would. They could also have deep(er) set eyes, have sharper features and this would be a very alluring individual combining the charm of libra and the more mysterious pluto

Sun in the 1st: Can point to having bigger or nicer hair, nice posture, structured shoulders/bodies. They can seem more open and approachable or perfect and unobtainable depending on their rising sign. Can do very well in the spotlight and possibly be motivated by people actively caring or taking notice 

Moon in the 1st: Can point to having rounder/deeper eyes, softer features and rounder faces. They can seem like someone whom you can open up to easily or someone who would need a lot of emotional support depending on their rising among other things. Can do very well giving advice 

Mercury in the 1st: Can point to looking younger, expressive/big eyes, bright demeanor. They can seem very curious and talkative or potentially a know-it-all depending on their rising among other things. Can do very well when they’re given a platform to speak their mind or is in a nonjudgmental atmosphere 

Venus in the 1st: Can point to having a balanced/harmonious face, heart/oval faces, composed look. They can seem charming and put together or possibly a bit vain depending on their rising among other things. Can do very well when helping others be more balanced/calm or choosing an aesthetic 

Mars in the 1st: Can point to having prominent eyebrows, sharp features, carefree (clothing) style. They can seem very confident and could take charge easily or impulsive and overbearing depending on their rising among other things. Can do very well when taking the lead and is guiding others 

Jupiter in the 1st: Can point to having long or shapely legs, wide smile, casual style. They can seem very cheery and humorous or pretentious depending on their rising sign among other things. Can do very well when they can share their ideas and when they’re exposed to new things/experiences 

Saturn in the 1st: Can point to having prominent bone structures, wardrobe of basic colors, stern look. They can seem very mature and polite or mean/unfriendly depending on their rising among other things. Can do very well teaching something they know very well or when they’re alone 

Uranus in the 1st: Can point to being very tall or short, large forehead and very expressive. They can seem very eccentric and independent or like they’re trying too hard depending on their rising among other things. Can do very well when they’re with people who are similar and can show their weirdness  

Neptune in the 1st: Can point to having dreamy/emotional eyes, sweet smile, fluctuating style. They can seem very mysterious and have a charm that you can’t quite put a finger on or seem to change too frequently depending on their rising among other things. Can do well with people who are peaceful 

Pluto in the 1st: Can point to having a strong/intimidating gaze, prominent eyes and bone structure. They can seem secretive and alluring or really untrusting depending on their rising among other things. Can do very well in occult things because they can understand more of the darker aspects to things 

If somebody had multiple planets in the 1st, they could first of all care about their appearance a lot and/or they could care a lot about how they come off. Their first impression to others is very important and how they want to come off could change based on their mood or the situation. Their appearance would also be more mixed, their actual rising sign could be more difficult to recognize 

Been Too LOOOOONG!!.... and my fan account of B.A.P Party Boom LA! *it’s LOOOOOONG*

Hello everyone!!! Hope you’re all doing well. Sorry, it’s been so crazy, that I haven’t really been able to do much if anything at all on Tumblr. Things are starting to slow down & I missed ya’ll…. If you still remember me :) I had to catch ya’ll up on what happened. I’ve changed jobs & moved all for the better, much, much happier with all of that, but it’s had me busy!!!!

Ok, so I HAVE to give my fan account of Party Boom LA, most in the chatrooms for @mjupnet already know. So my bestie Hana & I are checking into our hotel Sat around 3pm, I see a black mercedes sprinter van pull up & I tapped her shoulder thinking, could this be B.A.P? But I noticed that on the side it said tours, so I turned back around & told her never mind, as she was checking in. Less than what felt like a min later, I turned back around for kicks & I noticed the 1st person off the sprinter because of his bucket hat, it was BANG YONGGUK!!!!!! So my heart skips & I try to get my friends attention (without looking crazy) she keeps telling me hold on.  she FINALLY turns around & just nods her head & bugs her eyes a bit, but we’re trying SO hard to stay composed! By this point, now Zelo & Himchan have come in, while Yongguk & Jongup stood outside talking, then their manager & about 3 staff come in and stand right behind us for the check in counter. At this time, we haven’t seen Youngjae or Daehyun, but we’re DYING inside B.A.P IS IN OUR HOTEL!!!!! We’re trying to stay calm & not freak out (until we got to our room) The clerk couldn’t take ANY longer than he did, asking us about all of these upgrades!

Himchan, Zelo & 2 of their staff were headed towards the elevator, at the same point that we had to go up as well, but I was tooooo chicken to take the same elevator, sadly (what a fail) Hana still picks on me for this! I’m pretty sure if it was Yongguk & Jongup, I would’ve no hesitation, but they were still outside talking. We go to our room & SCREAM freaking out that we’re in the same hotel. There was a pool party & we raced to change & go chill, hoping that B.A.P would also be there. In the elevator, some of who we later learner where their staff were in their too & asked where we were going, we spoke of the pool party & they said they wished they could join, we told them they should, but they had to take care of some things for a special event the next day (we knew what it was ^_^) so we REALLY thought B.A.P would be there now. We lounged, the DJ was awesome, tons of ppl were there, but NO B.A.P, but we made an agreement, that since we fly to LA, this isn’t just for B.A.P, but also for us to have a vacation! SO we still enjoyed ourselves, had a yummy cocktail & then decided to go eat after about 2.5hrs. We head out to valet to get our rental car & as we’re sitting there, Youngjae walks right past us, I tapped Hana and then we see a few staff, there all headed to their van parked on the side. Then my eyes were blessed, Jongup walks past, a few times actually! it was pretty funny, he seemed so lost, yet adorable! I think after the 3rd time, I giggled, so he looked over, then smiled & waved. LOL! Hana had to go in & ask how late the pool & office would stay open, when she turned around, Himchan was just sitting in the lobby. So she greeted him in Korean, told him that we’d be at their concert the next night & hope they enjoyed their time & get to relax. He thanked her & was so kind, even when he walked out the door he greeted me & said thank you. Out walked Jongup again yelling HYUNG!! and Himchan happily waited for Jongup to catch up.

We were hoping our car would take longer, as Yongguk & Daehyun hadn’t come out. But NOPE, our car came & we didn’t want to just sit there, as we had to get food, etc… So as we drove off we waved & they waved back. We finished up what we were doing, came back changed again to go out at night, the lobby turns into a cool lounge w/ an awesome dj! So we chilled there, but my friend loves AOMG, and was like Bound LA is lit, we need to try that out & we can always come back. As we finished up our drink we were walking out, I see this guy sitting on the lounge chair & I said to Hana, wow, now HE’S beautiful, he looks up & smiles & it’s JUNG DAEHYUN, I wanted to die, but just smiled, but my heald down & walk faster to Bound LA (popular Korean club) But was annoyed, thinking he was going to chill in the lounge & possibly w/ other members… ie Yongguk & Jongup. But Hana was like I REALLY want to go & we can always come back. Well, thanks to coachella, what usually is LIT was not at all, there were probably 10ppl ttl inside. But we were like, more dance floor for us, met some cool ppl, had a drink & then decided after more dancing we’d leave & head back. We decided on another drink, as the bartender was really good & were just chilling there enjoying the music, Hana was facing the door & my back was towards it, but I saw her face & I knew….. we weren’t alone. Himchan, Jongup, Daehyun & Yongguk walk in & immediately go to a booth, they were probably as shocked as we were w/ how empty it was! But we knew then, WE WERE NOT LEAVING!!!!!! So we went back on the dance floor, now with about 5 other ppl & just had fun, not caring who was watching, (it’s was so empty, it was hard not to notice, but we ust had fun) But soon we once again got hungry, haha & after a few hours left & headed to BCD tofu house. We changed into comfy clothes, were chilling there & in walks Daehyun & their manager. A few min later Jongup and another staff member, no Yongguk or Himchan. And they were seated 1 table away, behind us on the right. because of a couple guys near us getting a little annoying, their Manager positioned himself to see & watch us (so nice) and made eyes w/ Hana (she was facing them) to make sure we were ok. They also alerted the waiters as well that were helping us all. The night calmed down & soon they left and us about 30 min later. 

By this point, if you’ve even read to this point, you’re wondering why we haven’t approached them more. Well, there were girls that stayed at our hotel ALL DAY for a glimpse of them. We didn’t want to be clumped into that group as those type of fans, in fact if we got stopped by some to ask if we saw them, we’d give opposite directions! Some of the staff (we didn’t know at the time) we’re in the elevator & some young girls asked if we’ve seen B.A.P… We told them, no (even thought we had JUST saw Himchan walk in) Soon we heard thank you, turned around & it was their staff, appreciative of how we handled it, we explained while we’re fans, we want them to enjoy & relax, they seemed shocked! 

Ok, so on to Sunday, still reading? almost done…. We assumed the boys were doing soundcheck in the am, blah blah blah & decided to just do our thing per usual, I was craving neng myun & we went to our fav place, as we waited for the car Himchan & one of the photographers walked up from getting juice (nope, not coffee) At this pt, we’ve bumped into him the most, Jongup 2nd, Daehyun 3rd Yongguk 4th, And only 1 time saw Youngjae and Zelo when we 1st checked in. Zelo had posted the brunch at our hotel & we assumed after that they left. We came back to the hotel after eating, changed & decided to chill by the pool. Hana wanted to in the sun & I wanted to chill in the shade, so I laid on the chairs. The music was really chill, had a nice summer vibe going (pineapple vodka in my hand) I was grooving & then an old school song came on & ppl starting reacting. In particular, me & a guy next to me, so we looked at each other & smiled, I kept my cool, but that guy was ZELO!!! I smiled back and laid back down, then texted my friend saying Zelo was 2 chairs away from me, so she made her way over! LOL but we still left him alone, he had 1 staff member with him, it was their translator for the US leg of the tour. We just wanted him to enjoy, so we left him alone.Even at one pt, his staff left & Zelo was just by himself about ½ hr, we almost felt protective of him, HE IS A PRECIOUS GUMDROP and sooo adorable, tall 7 very pale, ppl they are NOT whitewashing him…. the others, YES!!!. We did get to meet Yongguk, Himchan & Jongup last year, we even got to talk a bit more to them then honestly.    While we didn’t get a photo w/them, this meant the world to both of us, we saw them & saw them A LOT, but as THEMSELVES, not B.A.P! Let me tell you, They’re beyond beautiful w/out makeup & beyond nice, they also were very appreciative with how we let them be & even shielded them from some fans. But I think they thought we really weren’t fans, since we didn’t “act” like normal ones….. so when High touch came & we were in the last 10ppl to do high touch, the look on their faces… O_O…  & their reactions PRICELESS… We knew, they knew then we were fans & it all clicked! They wen’t to another spot for dinner after the concert & left in the afternoon the next day (Mon, we left Tues)they actually did late check out, due to the amount of fans waiting in the lobby :(.. and just probably tired. 

This was a trip we’ll NEVER forget & I hope they’ll remember it as fondly was we do & that we get to see them again next year!!!

IF you read this, you deserve a medal!!!! <3

anonymous asked:

Hi there! I have a story I'm writing in first person, and I need to show that the character's friend is in love/is falling in love with her, but the character doesn't realize it. Any tips on how to let the reader know the friend is head over heels?

If the friend is truly in love, there will likely be signs that they care very deeply for your main character, regardless of romantic feelings. The friend might make sacrifices for her, or do nice things without being asked. They might open up to her, hoping that she might reciprocate and let them into her personal bubble. They might notice small things about her, able to tell when she’s frustrated, happy, sad, and while it might seem like prying, maybe they’re not afraid of her being angry with them for being pushy when they’re truly concerned for her wellbeing. 

Don’t focus so much on “romantic” feelings. Focus on showing that the friend cares about her. It’s possible that these feelings will be misinterpreted as platonic feelings by your character, but readers will be able to see that the friend cares, and when romantic feelings are revealed, it won’t be a surprise. 

In addition to all this, you could try to establish some chemistry between them. What kinds of things do they talk about? Do they banter? Do they feel physically at ease with each other? Do they have a history of long friendship together? Have they experienced hardship together? What connects the two of them? What thing will they always have, regardless of whether or not they’re romantically involved? 

But above all, let the character’s actions show your readers how they feel about her. My one caution is to keep it reasonable. If your attempt is to show a well adjusted healthy relationship, don’t let the friend’s actions cross the line into worship or stalking. The way you do this is by developing the character well enough that they have their own personal goals and wants separate from being with her. There has to be limit to what they’ll do for her when it starts to conflict with what their wants are. And they have to be willing to express anger of their own, because they won’t always be happy with her. 

Unconditional love does not mean that you always agree and accept the person’s decisions, and it does not mean that you never speak your mind when you feel they’re in the wrong. And it doesn’t mean that you overlook potentially unforgivable actions. Try your best to think of times when the character feels less than loving towards her and how they come around from it. This will help you develop tension for their relationship, and it’ll be much more interesting to read. 

Bottom line: show the character’s love. Through their actions, through their knowledge of her habits and routines, through their willingness to help her and protect her. The protagonist might not see that it’s romantic love, but a reader will see the genuine feelings of care and concern and a declaration of love won’t be a shock. 

Good luck!

-Rebekah