1st black

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The fetishization of “opinion” and “free speech” is horrifying, people thinks it means they can saying anything anywhere without ever being criticized or held accountable or disagreed with regardless of their education on a subject.   

ANYWAY....It’s Black History Month:

So get ready for an obscure black history fact a day, because we all know about MLK, Rosa Parks and Malcolm X. 

I want to introduce you guys to Philippa Schuyler:


Given the current Hamilton craze, I thought you guys might enjoy this one. Philippa was the daughter of one George Schuyler, a black essayist, and Josephine Cogdell, a white model. Her great-great-grandfather is believed to be a black soldier who worked for Philip Schuyler (yes, Alexander Hamilton’s father-in-law) and adopted his last name. 

It is reported that Philippa could read and write as early as age 2 and was composing music at the age of 5. She was so talented that the New York mayor at the time would visit her home just to hear her play. She began touring in her adolescent years, but became disillusioned with music when she discovered her parents set out to see if a prodigy could be created. 

As she grew older she became more aware of the racial and gender stereotypes she encountered in the US and spent more of her time playing overseas. In her 30s she gave up music entirely to join her father in the journalism field. She was a vocal feminist and never married. 

While traveling to Vietnam as a war correspondent, the helicopter she was a passenger on went on a mission to rescue Vietnamese orphans. Unfortunately, it crashed into the sea. Although Philippa survived the initial crash, she could not swim and drowned. She was 35. 

The Philippa Schuyler Middle School for the Gifted and Talented in Bushwick, Brooklyn, New York is dedicated to preserving her memory. 

Greco-Roman Gold Earrings with Garnet African Heads, 2nd Century BC-1st Century AD

The jewelry of the Hellenistic and early Roman periods is among the finest of the ancient world, unsurpassed in richness of subject matter and composition, luxurious media and exquisite attention to detail.

This type of African head pendant originates from Greece, from the third to second century BC. Images of Ethiopians and Nubians were popular in Egyptian art but were relatively rare in the Mediterranean world until the conquest of Egypt by Alexander the Great in the late fourth century BC suddenly exposed the Greeks to the peoples of the African continent. As part of this new and intriguing Nilotic landscape, images of Africans evoked the distant and exotic cultures at the edge of the known world. The popularity of Nilotic themes coupled with a Greek tradition in jewelry of elaborate figural pendants (for example, beads, acorns, vessels, and female heads) led to the depiction of Nubians and Ethiopians as part of the popular repertory of wearable art. Initially, heads were fashioned wholly in gold, but by the late third and early second century, semi-precious stones were incorporated into the composition, as here. Materials rich and warm in color, such as carnelian, sardonyx, amber, and garnet, were all transformed into African figures, not only rendering each piece more elaborate, but also imbuing them with a striking liveliness and depth of character.

The use of gemstones set into gold jewelry remained a popular practice in the early Roman period; precious stones were said to have held magical properties and were considered markers of high social status. Pendants and earrings in the form of African heads seem to have been particularly popular in Italy, with examples known from Bari and Ruvo.

A pair of gold earrings with the head of an African in garnet is in the collection of the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore (inv. no. 57.1562-3, circa third century BC), and a similar pair from Cyme, Turkey, is in the British Museum, London (inv. no. 1877,0910.28, circa fourth to third century BC). However, these examples are earlier, and lack the clarity of form and sharpness of carving evident in the present pair.

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sirius and regulus + instagram x

two sides of the same coin

Roman “African Man”Bronze Oil Lamp, 1st Century BC/AD

A very fine cast bronze lamp in the form of a standing African male. He stands nude save cape over his shoulder, anatomically correct, holding a torch which acts as the spout to the lamp, small hole in his left shoulder acts as the fill hole. His feet are missing. The sculpture has developed a stunning multi-hued patina. 6 inches high.

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Simself Household Update..

Jehlani

Kyko

Lori

I promise I didn’t do the alphabetical order of the first names on purpose! lol

SS-Untersturmführer Werner Wolff photographed with the Knight’s Cross in 1943. Wolff, the battle-tested adjutant to Joachim Peiper (III./SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 2 “LAH"), took over a leaderless company, following the wounding of its commander, and stopped a massive enemy tank attack in which thirty Soviet tanks were destroyed in close combat during Operation Zitadelle in July 1943. Wolff destroyed one tank with hand held explosives and refused to give ground to the Soviet attack. For this he was decorated with the Knight’s Cross on 7 August 1943. Wolff fell in March 1945 near Inota, Hungary, as commander of the 7./SS-Panzer-Regiment 1 “LAH".