1991-raperin

April 1991: Kurdish refugees at the Turkish border following Saddam’s brutality.

This photo is one of the many horrific photos of the 1991 Kurdish Exodus in southern Kurdistan, the portion of Kurdistan that is in Iraq. The situation was so dire, that many Kurds died from starvation, hypothermia, injury, and other diseases.

These Kurds were running away from Saddam Hussein’s regime due to their relatives being part of the Peshmerga whom participated in the 1991 Rebellion of Slemani or talked about separatism- the names of those people were kept in Saddam’s figurative “Black Book”.

The Peshmerga, literally meaning ‘those who face death’, was a group of men and women alike in southern Kurdistan (Iraq) in the 1950s to the 1990s that fought against the Iraqi Army to get autonomy and protect the Kurdish citizens from frequent ethnic cleansing.

part of the ‘great bashurî rebellion of 1991’ set

 Today, March 7th 2013, is the 22nd anniversary of the Great Rebellion of Slemani (Raperinî Silemanî - 7 March 1991) - where Kurdish forces, mainly Peshmerga and regular everyday Kurdish civilians (men and women alike) pushed Saddam Hussein’s forces out of the city.

It was a rebellion that gave the Kurds of Bashur/Iraq hope that they too can prosper and rebel against Saddam. It was the revolt that inspired a revolution.

له‌ ئه‌رشیفی وێنه‌گر فایه‌ق حه‌مه‌ سالح 
پیشمه‌رگه‌یه‌كی بریندار بوو كاتی راپه‌رینی شاری سلێمانی

“Le erşîfî wênegr fayeq Hama salah, pîşmergeyekî brîndar bû katî raperînî şarî slêmanî.  wêneyi piyawîkî be temen ke le katî raperînekeyi salî 1991 slêmanî brîndar buwe her zaniyarî heye leser em wêneye boman binusît”

part of the ‘great başurî rebellion of 1991’ set
vimeo

video of the outside of amna suraka [red intelligence museum]. by Matin Hamarahem.

amna suraka was the former site of a ba'ath intelligence headquarters and prison. many kurds, some assyrians (atoraya) and arabs were also detained here, that were detained were sent here for questioning and when they weren’t being questioned, they were being tortured. the museum showcases the horrific terror the ba'ath regime inflicted onto the local kurds. statues are held in place of where kurds were formerly hung by their hands and feet and whipped numerous times, electrocuted, etc. women were raped and went through childbirth in there. even the prison cells still have the original blankets the former detainees used for warmth during the freezing damp nights of the winter.

once you visit this museum, you are guided throughout the interrogation and torture rooms. through the hall of mirrors where 4,050 light bulbs illuminate 150,000 pieces of broken mirrors. each piece of mirror represents the victims of saddam hussein’s terror on the iraqi population - the kurds, assyrians, shi'as, basically anyone not a pro-saddam sunni muslim.

the whole experience is very uneasy and horrific. from the moment you walk in and see that dim red light to the moment you walk out, you feel lucky that you were actually able to walk out of there alive unlike the many unfortunate ones.

this building during its time as an HQ for the ba'athist regime was taken over by the kurds of slemanî lead by the peshmerga forces on march 7, 1991.

Today, March 7th 2013, is the 22nd anniversary of the Great Rebellion of Slemani (Raperinî Silemanî - 7 March 1991) - where Kurdish forces, mainly Peshmerga and regular everyday Kurdish civilians (men and women alike) pushed Saddam Hussein’s forces out of the city.

It was a rebellion that gave the Kurds of Bashur/Iraq hope that they too can prosper and rebel against Saddam. It was the revolt that inspired a revolution.

This photo shows a man whom was shot down. I personally do not know the story behind this because I cannot read Soranî written in the Perso-Arabic script but if someone can translate this!!:

وێنه‌ی پیاویكی به‌ ته‌مه‌ن كه‌ له‌ كاتی راپه‌رینه‌كه‌ی سالی 1991 سلێمانی بریندار بووه‌ هیوادارین هه‌ر هاوریه‌كمان زانیاری هه‌یه‌ له‌سه‌ر ئه‌م وێنه‌یه‌ بۆمان بنوسیت