1968-olympics-black-power-salute

The 1968 Olympics Black Power Salute: African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos raise their fists in a gesture of solidarity at the 1968 Olympic games. Australian Silver medalist Peter Norman wore an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge in support of their protest. Both Americans were expelled from the games as a result

whilst tropicalia had given brazil’s musicians and songwriters a political voice during the 60’s, the black rio movement had to battle the odds: black soul was perceived as not being authentically brazilian and the country was under the rule of general medici’s oppressive dictatorship, which effectively suffocated cultural expression between 1969 and 1974.

the story of black rio is an exceptional one founded in the passion of soul and funk aficionados, a story that takes us across the america’s linking harlem to rio. it is the story of a music movement that influenced a generation of disenchanted black and poor brazilian youth, mirroring the struggles of their counterparts in north america.

the military censorship forbided images of mixed-race couples being shown on television, let alone the outright promotion of black culture. black rio was an important step forward in the reevaluation of black culture in brazil and opened the way for subsequent black music movements, such as the rap music scene that has sprung up in the suburbs of major brazilian cities.

what started out as a simple expression of the universal power of black music became a symbol for brazilians to leave the ghetto and choose their own destiny, music and fashion.

History Meme:
10/10 Moments » 1968 Olympics Black Power salute

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was an act of protest by the African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City. As they turned to face their flags and hear the American national anthem (The Star-Spangled Banner), they each raised a black-gloved fist and kept them raised until the anthem had finished. Smith, Carlos and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Tommie Smith stated that the gesture was not a “Black Power” salute, but a “human rights salute”. The event is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games. [X] [X]

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The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was a protest made by the African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympic Games in the Olympic StadiumMexico CityMexico. As they turned to face their flags and hear the American national anthem (The Star-Spangled Banner), they each raised a black-gloved fist and kept them raised until the anthem had finished.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968_Olympics_Black_Power_salute

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The 1968 Olympics Black Power Salute:
African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos raise their fists in a gesture of solidarity at the 1968 Olympic games. Australian Silver medalist Peter Norman wore an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge in support of their protest. Both Americans were expelled from the games as a result.


The Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics:
“The practice of sport is a human right. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport, without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play.” –Olympic Charter

John Carlos discusses the decades of social inequality that drove him to do the black power salute during the 200-meter dash medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympics. He also comments on the actions of other athletes who believe in social change and why an athlete would choose to risk their career to make a statement.

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1968 Olympics The Black Power Salute

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was an act of protest by the African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City. As they turned to face their flags and hear the American national anthem (The Star-Spangled Banner), they each raised a black-gloved fist and kept them raised until the anthem had finished. Smith, Carlos and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Tommie Smith stated that the gesture was not a “Black Power” salute, but a “human rights salute”. The event is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games! #blackhistory #TAGGOLOGY #blackrights #humanrights

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Very interesting video about Oberlin hiring African-American men, Cass Jackson and Tommie Smith, as a head coach and assistant coach for the 1973 football season. For those unfamiliar, Tommie Smith and John Carlos placed 1st and 3rd, respectively, in the 200m dash in the 1968 Olympics and they performed the Black Power Salute on the podium during the medal ceremony. Very interesting to see some footage of Oberlin in the 1970s, especially as part of this type of news piece.

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was an act of protest by the African-American athletes #TommieSmith and #JohnCarlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City.

As they turned to face their flags and hear the American national anthem (The Star-Spangled Banner), they each raised a black-gloved fist and kept them raised until the anthem had finished. Smith, Carlos and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Tommie Smith stated that the gesture was not a “Black Power” salute, but a “human rights salute”. The event is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games.

#1968Olympics #BlackHistoryMonth
#TeamLLF