1968-olympics-black-power-salute

The 1968 Olympics Black Power Salute: African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos raise their fists in a gesture of solidarity at the 1968 Olympic games. Australian Silver medalist Peter Norman wore an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge in support of their protest. Both Americans were expelled from the games as a result

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10/10 Moments » 1968 Olympics Black Power salute

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was an act of protest by the African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City. As they turned to face their flags and hear the American national anthem (The Star-Spangled Banner), they each raised a black-gloved fist and kept them raised until the anthem had finished. Smith, Carlos and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Tommie Smith stated that the gesture was not a “Black Power” salute, but a “human rights salute”. The event is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games. [X] [X]

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The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was a protest made by the African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympic Games in the Olympic StadiumMexico CityMexico. As they turned to face their flags and hear the American national anthem (The Star-Spangled Banner), they each raised a black-gloved fist and kept them raised until the anthem had finished.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968_Olympics_Black_Power_salute

witnify.com
1968 Olympics Black Power Salute | Interviewing John Carlos

John Carlos discusses the decades of social inequality that drove him to do the black power salute during the 200-meter dash medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympics. He also comments on the actions of other athletes who believe in social change and why an athlete would choose to risk their career to make a statement.

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White america is reacting to Beyonce’s perfomance at the Superbowl 2016, the same way they reacted to the black power salute in 1968, at the Olympic Games, and its extremely scary & says a lot about america today. 

I don’t even live, or plan to live in the US, but it scares me so fucking much. Because thats exactly the kind of things, Trump need for his campaign.

I’m not saying its something we didnt know before, aka that the US is filled with brainless racists who are blinded by Fox Media & their priviledges, but the way the openly express it without any fear today, is to me very different, and speak volume.

But yet again, i’m just an outside witness.

Watch on outandaboutnycmag.tumblr.com

2/9/16 O&A NYC INSPIRATIONAL TUESDAY: Tommie Smith and John Carlos- The Sports Moment That Changed the World

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute, an act of protest by the African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos, took place during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium, Mexico City.

Watch on outandaboutnycmag.tumblr.com

2/9/16 O&A NYC INSPIRATIONALTUESDAY: Tommie Smith and John Carlos “Human Right Salute”

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute, an act of protest by the African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos, took place during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium, Mexico City.

Watch on outandaboutnycmag.tumblr.com

2/9/16 O&A NYC INSPIRATIONALTUESDAY: 2/9/16 O&A NYC INSPIRATIONAL TUESDAY: Tommie Smith and John Carlos Human Right Salute at the Medal Ceremony 1968 Olympics

The 1968 Olympics Black Power, an act of protest by the African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos, took place during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium, Mexico City.