1966 1971

The signs as classic dystopian films

aries: nineteen eighty-four (1984)

taurus: blade runner (1982)

gemini: fahrenheit 451 (1966)

cancer: thx 1138 (1971)

leo: the running man (1987)

virgo: twelve monkeys (1995)

libra: escape from new york (1981)

scorpio: a clockwork orange (1971)

sagittarius: robocop (1987)

capricorn: the terminator (1984)

aquarius: mad max (1979)

pisces: total recall (1990)

2

Victoria AU - Dark Shadows (1966-1971 TV Series)

Barnabus Collins - Lord Melbourne
Maggie Evans/Victoria Winters/Josette DuPres-Collins - Victoria
Angelique Brouchard-Collins - Lady Caroline Lamb
Joe Haskell - Albert
Quentin Collins - Ernest
Amanda Harris - Harriet Sutherland
Dr. Julia Hoffman - Emma Portman
Carolyn Stoddard - Nancy Skerrett
Chris Jennings - Charles Francatelli
Elizabeth Collins-Stoddard - Duchess of Kent
Roger Collins - Leopold
Willie Loomis - Lord Alfred
Professor Stokes - Robert Peel

In 1967 Maggie Winters leaves her diner job to work for the wealthy Collins’ family as a governess to Leopold’s young son David in their gothic Maine mansion.  Many stories have been told about supernatural things occurring on the Collins’ property, but Maggie enjoys her job and the family, especially her best friends the heiress Nancy and Harriet, the fiancé of Nancy’s cousin Ernest.  Things change when groundskeeper Alfred finds a coffin hidden in the abandoned old family home and after opening it reawakens William Collins, the family's ancestor who was cursed into a vampire by the witch/his former lover Caroline over 100 years earlier. William tries to control his urges and rejoin his descendants and family company by posing as a distant cousin from England but they notice his resemblance to the original William. Family friend Professor Stokes though is highly suspicious having knowledge of supernatural forces. However, William’s plan goes smoothly until he meets Maggie, who looks exactly like his late beloved wife Victoria, who Caroline killed. Maggie is stunned by this resemblance but is drawn to William, even though she’s dating Albert, as they become friends and bond over their shared love and concern for David.  William then shows her the music box he gifted Victoria and suddenly memories return to Maggie and she realizes she is Victoria reincarnated.  Wanting to remain together in their second chance at love they then ask the help of Dr. Emma Portman to create a cure to make William mortal again.

Meanwhile, William realizes Ernest Collins is actually his younger cousin from his own time as Ernest too is now immortal from a spell Caroline casted. However, this was to help Ernest, whom she also cared for, live a normal life as he is a werewolf and the painting she created holds the curse at bay while he stays young. If the painting is destroyed he will become a werewolf and mortal again, which complicates his relationship with Harriet who has no idea of his past and as he helps Nancy’s boyfriend Charles who has been bitten by the pack of werewolves in the woods.

Things take a turn for the worse when Caroline is brought back to life as an unsuspecting Leopold finds her hidden portrait she trapped herself inside and tricks him into opening, and she tries to kill Maggie, Harriet, and destroy Ernest’s painting to have William for herself and destroy the lives of the Collins family.  But the family bands together to stop Caroline, even enlisting the help of Professor Stokes, and Emma races to finish the cure for everyone to have a happy ending before they all die.

La Horse
Serge Gainsbourg
La Horse

Serge Gainsbourg - La Horse (1969)

World Cup - Nigeria v. France

Since I posted an oddball Nigerian musician,it’s only appropriate to post a track by France’s premier eccentric, Serge Gainsbourg. La Horse (Heroin) is a very cool instrumental with a quite strange banjo break. Oh yeah, let’s give Jean-Claude Vannier some props.

In case you need an idea of what that looks like, Kentucky basketball has:

NCAA Tournament champions: 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1978, 1996, 1998, 2012

NCAA Tournament runner up: 1966, 1975, 1997, 2014

NCAA Tournament Final Four: 1942, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1966, 1975, 1978, 1984, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2011, 2012, 2014

NCAA Tournament Elite Eight: 1942, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1961, 1962, 1966, 1968, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2005, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014

NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen: 1951, 1952, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014

NCAA Tournament appearances: 1942, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014

Conference tournament champions: 1921, 1933, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1942, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1952, 1984, 1986, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2010, 2011 (Note: There was no SEC tourney from 1953–1978.)

Conference regular season champions1926, 1932, 1933, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1942, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2010, 2012

10

Between 1960s and 1970s, Leonid Gaidai directed a number of top-selling comedic films in the USSR including; Operation Y and Other Adventures of Shurik (1965), Kidnapping Caucasian Style (1966), Twelve Chairs (1971), and Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future (1973),etc. His films were full of physical comedy as well as sharp wit. Many of the quotes from his films have been absorbed into the Russian language. His most famous film, The Diamond Arm (1968), sold 76,700,000 ticks in the Soviet Union alone, and at least five of his films had sold more than 50 million tickets. Yet due to the state-controlled nature of the Soviet movie industry, all of the revenue went back to the state. Gaidai received a small percentage of ticket sales but this did not last long as even a small royalty would quickly have made him a multimillionaire. With the perestroika and changes in the society, Gaidai’s success declined but even to this day he remains one of the most popular Soviet comedy directors.

Leonid Gaidai (January 30, 1923- November 19,1993)