1964 World’s Fair

Golden skyscrapers. Sunset view of Midtown Manhattan modern skyscrapers from the top of Rockefeller Center’s International Building in the autumn of 1963. At left is the 52-story Union Carbide Building (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1960) and behind it, the steel skeleton of the new 50-story Chemical Bank New York Trust Building at 277 Park Avenue (Emery Roth & Sons, 1964) under construction. The Art Deco’s golden crown of the Chrysler Building (William Van Allen, 1930), with the New York Central (Warren & Wetmore, 1929) and the 59-story Pan Am Building (Walter Gropius-Emery Roth & Sons-Pietro Belluschi) can be seen on right.

Photo: Eliott Elisofon/LIFE Magazine.

Source: “New York World’s Fair 1964/1965 Official Souvenir Book” (New York, Time & Life, 1964).

“Carousel of Progress” John Hench, 1967

When Walt Disney’s Carousel of Progress made its grand debut at the 1964 New York World’s Fair, it quickly became one of the fair’s most-visited pavilions and delighted guests with its musical story of progress and optimism. The theater system, where guests would stay seated and rotate around different scenes, and the flashy new Audio Animatronics wowed visitors young and old. The overwhelming success inspired Walt and the Imagineers to include the attraction in their plans for 1967’s New Tomorrowland at Disneyland, shown here in a piece by John Hench. While the attraction has since moved to Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom, its legacy has continued on, and this great big beautiful tomorrow is the longest running stage show in the history of American theater.

Art ©️Disney

HEXAGON PLANS 

From Left to Right: 

Harriet Irwin, Hexagonal Building, Plan, Charlotte, North Carolina / Wallace K. Harrison, Hall of Science, Plan, 1964 World’s Fair, New York, New York 

Guy Lowell, County Court House, Plan, New York, New York / Vacation & Leisure Home Plans, Plan No. 9392