1950s germany

UH OH LOOKS LIKE WE’VE GOT A HYDRA FAN

andarthas-webreplied to your post:[Captain America (2011-2012) #1]“Got solid intel…

*facepalms* Painfully obvious none of you read the comics and are making snap judgements based on incomplete info. Also, you couldn’t tell a nazi from a fascist and a hero from a villain if your life depended on it….

Okay. Wow. I can’t believe we’re here. I’m savoring this moment hold on. Let me breathe it in. Let me just lap it up. I have to feel the grace of God come over me so I don’t school yo ass too hard. Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh

Okay

Yup. First off, you…. commented on a screencap of me reading the comic. That I own. That I can take screencaps of. That is in my library. On Comixology. That I paid for. Since most of my library, y’know this one

pales in comparison to the one I’m used to having since I moved across the country and don’t have access to the accumulative collection of mine, my dad’s, and my sister’s. Y’know. The one that has comics dating back to first printings in the 60s. But whatever.

What do I have on Comixology at this point?

Oh right. 2634, most of which are trade collections. And that’s not counting the hundreds of issues I have in the archive because I’ve already used them on my comic book reference blog @renaramblesaboutcomics​. Y’know. Where I’m hosting my comic reviews and live reads I’ve been doing on tumblr since 2011.

But you’re riiiiiight. Maybe I don’t have the reference for Cap. Gosh darnit I’m just such a newb. What the fuck’s wrong with me, commenting on Cap comics I don’t know shit about.

Ohhhhhhhh right. I just own the whole fucking run you’re referring to. Right right. Not to mention I have read the Ultimate comics, the Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale Captain America: White, the Sam Wilson Cap comic before Spencer lost his goddamn mind, and a couple dozen more not to mention the Avengers comics I own, the Spider-Man guest appearances, the X-Men guest appearances, the guest appearances in Captain and Ms. Marvel books, and all those other comics that feature him.

My bad. Looks like you’re full of shit. And I’m an actual Cap Fan. Uh oh.

Looks like you’re in trouble.

But I have to close out with one more thing:

Okay I’ll stay away from the obvious answer which is that you…. apparently know that the National Socialist Movement in 1930s Germany was …. fascist. But that’s okay. (It’s actually not, it just shows you’re fucking ridiculous)

The thing is you’re accusing me of not being able to recognize either. So let me introduce you to someone I’m pretty sure knows Nazis when she sees them.

Hi. I’m Renaroo. I run this blog, also @renaramblesaboutcomics​. Along with being a lifetime comic book fan,the daughter of comic book fans, and the granddaughter of comic book fans, I’m something else that you would know if you wandered around my blog any:

I’m German-American. Specifically I’m only the second generation of Americans in my family. My family came over from post-Nazi Germany in 1950. Specifically I have to thank this little woman in the middle:

That’s my grandma. Actually she’s all of our Grandma – We’re now a family of Italian-German-Americans,l Mexican-Americans, Polish-German Americans, and (my sister and I) Appalachian-German-Americans.

My Grandma just turned 78 this year and in her lifetime she lived through, you guessed it, World War II and Nazi Germany. In fact, she lost her father in the war – my great-grandfather.

She was also as a young child mauled and attacked by an SS German police dog, which she has scars on her arms from. They’re next to the scars she got from her time as a welder in a metal shop in Akron, Ohio during the rubber boom, but that’s less relevant.

This 4′9″ woman has taught me many things over the years. She helped raise my sister and me. And some of things she, and my great-grandmother before she died at the age of 98, would talk to us about was living under a fascist dictatorship and how that place was called…

wait for it…

Nazi Germany.

So, yes. I know what Nazis are. I know what fascists are. If I didn’t, I could call up my comic book collecting dad who is also a history professor, and get him to explain it to us, but I’m pretty sure I don’t have to.

Why?

Because before slow roasting you over a fire, I guess I could’ve pointed out this. It’s sometimes hard to find so I don’t really blame you for not having read it yourself. I’m not an asshole comic book fan who lords that sort of thing over people

But here’s Captain America (1941-1950) #1:

[Captain America (1940-1941) #1]

Oh wow look it’’s Red Skull’s first appearance. What’s that he’s wearing on his chest? Why doesn’t he know he leads HYDRA? Not Nazis. That’s so weird I wonder what the two have in common…

P.S. @andarthas-web​, in case it’s not obviously apparent from the entirety of this post you enabled by trying smear shit on my original post: You’re a fucking idiot.

8

Traditional costumes of Sorbs (also known as Wends, Lusatians, Lusatian Sorbs or Lusatian Serbs) - Western Slavic minority in the territory of Germany. They live predominantly in the historical region of Lusatia - in the modern states of Brandenburg and Saxony. They speak Sorbian languages (Wendish, Lusatian) - closely related to Polish and Czech, divided into two main groups: Upper Sorbian and Lower Sorbian. Collection of archival photographs from vintage postcards.

Die Gorch Fock is a tall ship of the German Navy (Deutsche Marine). She is the second ship of that name as a sister ship of the Gorch Fock built in 1933. Both are named in honor of the German writer Johann Kinau who wrote under the pseudonym “Gorch Fock” and died in the battle of Jutland/Skagerrak in 1916. The modern-day Gorch Fock was built in 1958 and had undertaken 146 cruises by 2006, including a tour around the world in 1988. She is under the command of the Naval Academy in Flensburg-Mürwik.

Vietnamese people form Germany’s largest group of resident foreigners from Asia. Federal Statistical Office figures showed 83,446 Vietnamese nationals residing in Germany in 2005 (not included are individuals of Viet origin or descent who have been naturalized as German citizens - between 1981-2007, 41,500 people renounced Vietnamese citizenship to take up German nationality). A further 40,000 irregular migrants of Vietnamese origin were estimated to live in Germany, largely concentrated in the Eastern states.

The Vietnamese community in Western Germany consists of refugees from the Vietnam War. The first boat people who fled the country after the fall of Saigon, consisting of 208 families (640 individuals), who arrived in Hanover in 1978. None spoke German. They received official aid such as social benefits and job placement assistance, as well as societal support for their successful adaptation to German life. By the eve of German reunification, West Germany had roughly 33,000 Vietnamese people, largely consisting of boat people and their relatives who were admitted under family reunification schemes.[

East Germany began to invite North Vietnamese to attend study and training programs in the 1950s; cooperation expanded in 1973, when they pledged to train a further 10,000 Vietnamese citizens in the following 10 years. In 1980, they signed an agreement with reunified Vietnam to provide training. The East German government viewed industrial trainee programs not just as a means to increase the labor supply to local industry, but also as development aid to the poorer members of the Socialist Bloc. By 1985, Vietnamese, along with Africans from Mozambique, comprised the main groups of foreign laborers in the DDR. From just 2,482 in 1980, the number of Vietnamese residents grew to 59,053 by 1989. Communities were concentrated mainly in Karl-Marx-Stadt, Dresden, East Berlin, Erfurt, and Leipzig. Their contracts were supposed to last for 5 years, after which they would return home. 

After Reunification, the government sought to reduce populations of former guest workers in the east by offering each DM 3,000 to return home. Tens of thousands took the offer, but they were soon replaced by a further influx of Viet asylum-seekers who had been contract workers in other Eastern European nations. Throughout the 1990s, German attempts to repatriate the new immigrants back to their country were not very successful, due to both Berlin’s reluctance to forcibly deport, and Hanoi’s refusal to re-admit; however, nearly 4/10 were barred from permanent residency. 

Today, about 10,000 Vietnamese people live in Berlin, of whom roughly 25% consist of Hoa (descendants of Chinese immigrants to Vietnam). Vietnamese, along with Koreans, form one of the only Asian groups in which men and women migrated to Germany in roughly equal numbers, at least among legal residents - in contrast, there are far more Thai and Filipino women than men in Germany, while the reverse holds true for Chinese and Indians.

Studies by German education experts show that Vietnamese children are among the highest performing pupils in Germany (50% gaining entry into Gymnasiums). Vietnamese students in Eastern Germany who grow up in poverty typically outperform their peers, such as Turks and Italians. Notable people from the Viet community include Philipp Rösler (Vice-Chancellor of Germany, Federal Minister of Economics & Tech & chairman of the FDP), Dang Ngoc Long (composer), Marcel Nguyen (Olympic gymnast & silver medalist), Minh-Khai Phan-Thi (actress & former presenter for German music channel “VIVA”), and Phạm Nguyễn Lan Phiên (piano prodigy, youngest piano student accepted at the Frankfurt College of Music).

Elephant breaks free from German monorail, 1950. On 21 July 1950, in town of Wuppertal, Germany, an elephant called Tuffi, jumped off the local monorail, and the photographer was lucky to get the shot. The elephant has survived the fall, due to the low height and the water below, and lived for next 40 years.