Dec. 17, 1957: “No city in the world, Bub, will give you the variety of wheeled things you get here,” Harold Robert Semerau, a wandering widowed repairman for the Salvation Army from Butternut, Wis., told The New York Times. He elaborated: “You get all the American makes, and in shipments from Park Avenue and Fifth Avenue and ‘way over East where the rich kids live you get foreign things. You get wheeled rigs that cost up to $125 and more. We get things with sad stories behind ‘em. Crushed wheels and carriages where some father backed out of a garage without looking; toys of kids who have died; brand-new things a family gets rid of because the father’s been switched to a new job on the West Coast and doesn’t have room to take them along. You could read whole stories into wheeled things, Bub.” Photo: William Eckenberg/The New York Times