1945 1947

8

Happy 101st Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!
April 5th, 1916 - June 12th, 2003

You have to dream, you have to have a vision, and you have to set a goal for yourself that might even scare you a little because sometimes that seems far beyond your reach. Then I think you have to develop a kind of resistance to rejection, and to the disappointments that are sure to come your way.

Movies feat. serial killers, spree killers, and other things like that

70 Movies (biographical and not) with serial killers characters.

*movies in italic are biographical movies*

*♥ = personal recommendation*


The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) ♥

M (1931)

Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932)

The Most Dangerous Game (1932)

Mystery of the Wax Museum (1933) 

Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

Arsenic and Old Lace (1944) ♥

Bluebeard (1944) 

The Spiral Staircase (1945)

Monsieur Verdoux (1947)

The Night of Hunter (1955)

The Bad Seed (1956) ♥

The Devil Strikes at Night (1957)

Psycho (1960) 

Keep reading

10

Mark Rothko, Watercolors

1- Untitled , 1944. watercolor, ink and graphite on paper (recto and verso), 21" x 14-15/16" (53.3 cm x 37.9 cm).

2-   Untitled , 1944. watercolor and ink on paper (recto)watercolor on paper (verso), 40-½" x 27" (102.9 cm x 68.6 cm).

3-  Untitled , 1942-1943. watercolor, ink and graphite on paper, 20-15/16" x 14-13/16" (53.2 cm x 37.6 cm).

4-  Untitled , 1946-1947. watercolor and ink on paper, 40-½" x 27-3/8" (102.9 cm x 69.5 cm).

5-  Untitled , 1944-1945. watercolor and ink on paper, 22" x 30" (55.9 cm x 76.2 cm).

6-  Untitled , 1944-1945. watercolor on paper, 27-1/16" x 40-½" (68.7 cm x 102.9 cm).

7-  Untitled , 1945-1947. watercolor, ink and graphite on paper, 20-7/8" x 14-7/8" (53 cm x 37.8 cm).

8-  Untitled , 1943-1945. watercolor and ink on paper (recto and verso), 22-5/8" x 31-1/16" (57.5 cm x 78.9 cm).

9-  Untitled , 1943-1945. watercolor and ink on paper (recto and verso), 22-5/8" x 31-1/16" (57.5 cm x 78.9 cm).

10-  Untitled , 1944. watercolor and ink on paper (recto)watercolor on paper (verso), 40-½" x 27" (102.9 cm x 68.6 cm).

anonymous asked:

i'm not american so this might be a dumb question but is there a vice presidential line of succession or does maybe the next person in the presidential line move up if there's a vp that dies

No, there isn’t a Vice Presidential line of succession. In the case of a Vice Presidential vacancy, the 25th Amendment, ratified in 1967, allows the President to appoint a new VP who must be confirmed by both the House and the Senate. This has happened twice: in 1973 when President Nixon appointed Gerald Ford to fill the vacancy created when Vice President Spiro Agnew was forced to resign the Vice Presidency, and in 1974 when Ford succeeded Nixon as President and appointed Nelson Rockefeller to fill his vacancy.

A mechanism for filling a vacancy in the Vice Presidency was badly needed. I’ve written about it before, but the Vice Presidency has existed since 1789 and in those 228 years there has been a vacancy in the Vice Presidency for nearly 38 years overall. So, for over 16% of our nation’s history, there hasn’t been anybody in the most important position in the Presidential line of succession. And to point out even more explicitly how crazy that is, think of it this way: every time in American history that a President has died in office or been assassinated, the new President who assumed office didn’t have a Vice President of their own.

This is from an older post on this same subject:

7 Vice Presidents died in office:
•George Clinton died April 20, 1812, leaving the office vacant for 318 days
•Elbridge Gerry died November 23, 1814, leaving the office vacant for 2 years, 101 days.
•William Rufus DeVane King died April 18, 1853, leaving the office vacant for 3 years, 320 days.
•Henry Wilson died on November 22, 1875, leaving the office vacant for 1 year, 102 days
•Thomas A. Hendricks died on November 24, 1885, leaving the office vacant for 3 years, 99 days.
•Garret A. Hobart died on November 21, 1899, leaving the office vacant for 1 year, 103 days.
•James S. Sherman died on October 30, 1912, leaving the office vacant for 125 days.

2 Vice Presidents resigned from office:
•John C. Calhoun resigned on December 28, 1832, leaving the office vacant for 66 days.
•Spiro Agnew resigned on October 10, 1973, leaving the office vacant for 57 days.

9 Vice Presidents succeeded to the Presidency:
•John Tyler succeeded to the White House upon President Harrison’s death on April 4, 1841, leaving the Vice Presidency vacant for 3 years, 333 days.
•Millard Fillmore succeeded to the White House upon President Taylor’s death on July 9, 1850, leaving the Vice Presidency vacant for 2 years, 238 days.
•Andrew Johnson succeeded to the White House upon President Lincoln’s death on April 15, 1865, leaving the Vice Presidency vacant for 3 years, 323 days.
•Chester Arthur succeeded to the White House upon President Garfield’s death on September 19, 1881, leaving the Vice Presidency vacant for 3 years, 166 days.
•Theodore Roosevelt succeeded to the White House upon President McKinley’s death on September 14, 1901, leaving the Vice Presidency vacant for 3 years, 171 days.
•Calvin Coolidge succeeded to the White House upon President Harding’s death on August 2, 1923, leaving the Vice Presidency vacant for 1 year, 214 days.
•Harry Truman succeeded to the White House upon President Roosevelt’s death on April 12, 1945, leaving the Vice Presidency vacant for 3 years, 283 days.
•Lyndon Johnson succeeded to the White House upon President Kennedy’s death on November 22, 1963, leaving the Vice Presidency vacant for 1 year, 59 days.
•Gerald Ford succeeded to the White House upon President Nixon’s resignation on August 9, 1974, leaving the Vice Presidency vacant for 132 days.

There was no provision established for filling a vacancy in the Vice Presidency until the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1967.  The Amendment allows the President to fill a vacancy in the Vice Presidency by appointing a new Vice President who must be confirmed by a majority vote in the House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Two Vice Presidential vacancies have been filled under the 25th Amendment. Gerald Ford was appointed to the Vice Presidency by President Nixon following Spiro Agnew’s resignation in October 1973 and confirmed by Congress in December.  In August 1974, President Nixon resigned, Gerald Ford succeeded to the Presidency and President Ford appointed Nelson Rockefeller as the new Vice President.  Rockefeller was confirmed as Vice President by Congress on December 19, 1974.

If any of the Vice Presidents who succeeded to the Presidency prior to the ratification of the 25th Amendment had died in office, the first person in the line of succession would have been – depending on the year – an “Officer” chosen by Congress (1789-1792), president pro tempore of the U.S. Senate (1792-1886), Secretary of State (1886-1947), or Speaker of the House of Representatives (1947-present).

Here are the people who were first in the line of succession to the Presidency due to a Vice Presidential vacancy prior to the ratification of the 25th Amendment:

Presidency of James Madison (Mar. 4, 1809-Mar. 4, 1817)
(Vacancy from April 20, 1812-March 4, 1813 due to the death of Vice President George Clinton. Vacancy from November 23, 1814-March 4, 1817 due to the death of Vice President Elbridge Gerry) 
•Apr. 20, 1812-Mar. 4, 1813: William H. Crawford, president pro tempore of the Senate
•Nov. 23, 1814-Nov. 25, 1814: Langdon Cheves, Speaker of the House
•Nov. 25, 1814-Mar. 4, 1817: John Gaillard, president pro tempore of the Senate

Presidency of Andrew Jackson (Mar. 4, 1829-Mar. 4, 1837)
(Vacancy from December 28, 1832-Mar. 4, 1833 due to the resignation of Vice President John C. Calhoun)
•Dec. 28, 1832-Mar. 4, 1833: Hugh Lawson White, president pro tempore of the Senate

Presidency of John Tyler (Apr. 4, 1841-Mar. 4, 1845)
•Apr. 4, 1841-May 31, 1842: Samuel L. Southard, president pro tempore of the Senate
•May 31, 1842-Mar. 4, 1845: Willie Person Mangum, president pro tempore of the Senate

Presidency of Millard Fillmore (July 9, 1850-Mar. 4, 1853)
•July 9, 1850-July 11, 1850: Howell Cobb, as Speaker of the House, was next in line to the Presidency for the two days following President Taylor’s death since there was no president pro tempore of the Senate, but Cobb was Constitutionally ineligible to be President as he was only 34 years of age.
•July 11, 1850-Dec. 20, 1852: William Rufus DeVane King, president pro tempore of the Senate
•Dec. 20, 1852-Mar. 4, 1853, David Rice Atchison, president pro tempore of the Senate

Presidency of Franklin Pierce (Mar. 4, 1853-Mar. 4, 1857)
(Vacancy from April 18, 1853-March 4, 1857 due to the death of Vice President William R. D. King)
•Apr. 18, 1853-Dec. 4, 1854: David Rice Atchison, president pro tempore of the Senate
•Dec. 4, 1854-Dec. 5, 1854: Lewis Cass, president pro tempore of the Senate
•Dec. 5, 1854-June 9, 1856: Jesse D. Bright, president pro tempore of the Senate
•June 9, 1856-June 10, 1856: Charles E. Stuart, president pro tempore of the Senate
•June 10, 1856-Jan. 6, 1857: Jesse D. Bright, president pro tempore of the Senate
•Jan. 6, 1857-Mar. 4, 1857: James Murray Mason, president pro tempore of the Senate

Presidency of Andrew Johnson (Apr. 15, 1865-Mar. 4, 1869)
•Apr. 15, 1865-Mar. 2, 1867: Lafayette Sabine Foster, president pro tempore of the Senate
•Mar. 2, 1867-Mar. 4, 1869: Benjamin Franklin Wade, president pro tempore of the Senate

Presidency of Ulysses S. Grant (Mar. 4, 1869-Mar. 4, 1877)
(Vacancy from Nov. 22, 1875-Mar. 4, 1877 due to the death of Vice President Henry Wilson)
•Nov. 22, 1875-Mar. 4, 1877: Thomas W. Ferry, president pro tempore of the Senate

Presidency of Chester Arthur (Sept. 19, 1881-Mar. 4, 1885)
•Sept. 19, 1881-Oct. 10, 1881: There was literally NO ONE in the Presidential line of succession until a special session of the Senate nearly a month after President Garfield’s assassination. At the time of Garfield’s death and Arthur’s succession creating a vacancy in the Vice Presidency there were also vacancies in the offices of Speaker of the House and president pro tempore of the Senate.
•Oct. 10, 1881-Oct. 13, 1881: Thomas Francis Bayard, president pro tempore of the Senate
•Oct. 13, 1881-Mar. 3, 1883: David Davis, president pro tempore of the Senate
•Mar. 3, 1883-Mar. 4, 1885: George Franklin Edmunds, president pro tempore of the Senate

Presidency of Grover Cleveland (Mar. 4, 1885-Mar. 4, 1889)
(Vacancy from November 25, 1885-December 7, 1885 due to the death of Vice President Thomas A. Hendricks)
•Nov. 25, 1885-Dec. 7, 1885: At the time of Vice President Hendricks’s death creating a vacancy in the Vice Presidency there were also vacancies in the offices of Speaker of the House and president pro tempore of the Senate. For twelve days nobody was in the Presidential line of succession.
•Dec. 7, 1885-Jan. 19, 1886: John Sherman, president pro tempore of the Senate
•Jan. 19, 1886-Mar. 4, 1889: Thomas F. Bayard, Secretary of State

Presidency of William McKinley (Mar. 4, 1897-Sept. 14, 1901)
(Vacancy from November 21, 1899-March 4, 1901 due to the death of Vice President Garret A. Hobart)
•Nov. 21, 1899-Mar. 4, 1901: John Hay, Secretary of State

Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt (Sept. 14, 1901-Mar. 4, 1905)
•Sept. 14, 1901-Mar. 4, 1905: John Hay, Secretary of State

Presidency of William Howard Taft (Mar. 4, 1909-Mar. 4, 1913)
(Vacancy from October 30, 1912-March 4, 1913 due to the death of Vice President James Schoolcraft Sherman)
•Oct. 30, 1912-Mar. 4, 1913: Philander C. Knox, Secretary of State

Presidency of Calvin Coolidge (Aug. 2, 1923-Mar. 4, 1925)
•Aug. 2, 1923-Mar. 4, 1925: Charles Evans Hughes, Secretary of State

Presidency of Harry Truman (Apr. 12, 1945-Jan. 20, 1949)
•Apr. 12, 1945-June 27, 1945: Edward R. Stettinius, Secretary of State
•June 27, 1947-July 3, 1945: Henry Morgenthau, Secretary of the Treaury
•July 3, 1945-Jan. 21, 1947: James F. Byrnes, Secretary of State
•Jan. 21, 1947-July 17, 1947: George C. Marshall, Secretary of State
•July 17, 1947-Jan. 3, 1949: Joseph W. Martin, Speaker of the House
•Jan. 3, 1949-Jan. 20, 1949: Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House

Presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson (Nov. 22, 1963-Jan. 20, 1965)
•Nov. 22, 1963-Jan. 20, 1965: John W. McCormack, Speaker of the House

Presidency of Richard Nixon (Jan. 20, 1969-Aug. 9, 1974)
(Vacancy between the resignation of Vice President Spiro Agnew on October 10, 1973 and the confirmation of Vice Presidential nominee Gerald Ford on December 6, 1973.)
•Oct. 10, 1973-Dec. 6, 1973: Carl Albert, Speaker of the House

Presidency of Gerald Ford (Aug. 9, 1974-Jan. 20, 1977)
(Vacancy between Vice President Gerald Ford’s succession to the Presidency on August 9, 1974 and the confirmation of Vice Presidential nominee Nelson Rockefeller on December 19, 1974.)
•Aug. 9, 1974-Dec. 19, 1974: Carl Albert, Speaker of the House

Alguien ha entrado en la memoria blanca, en la inmovilidad del corazón. 


Veo una luz debajo de la niebla y la dulzura del error me hace cerrar los ojos. 


En la ebriedad de la melancolía; como acercar el rostro a una rosa enferma, indecisa entre el perfume y la muerte.

ANTONIO GAMONEDA



Foto: Pierre Jahan, L'herbier surréaliste (1945-1947) © Pierre Jahan/Roger Viollet. Courtesy Galerie Michèle Chomette

In case you need an idea of what that looks like, Kentucky basketball has:

NCAA Tournament champions: 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1978, 1996, 1998, 2012

NCAA Tournament runner up: 1966, 1975, 1997, 2014

NCAA Tournament Final Four: 1942, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1966, 1975, 1978, 1984, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2011, 2012, 2014

NCAA Tournament Elite Eight: 1942, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1961, 1962, 1966, 1968, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2005, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014

NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen: 1951, 1952, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014

NCAA Tournament appearances: 1942, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014

Conference tournament champions: 1921, 1933, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1942, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1952, 1984, 1986, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2010, 2011 (Note: There was no SEC tourney from 1953–1978.)

Conference regular season champions1926, 1932, 1933, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1942, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2010, 2012

anonymous asked:

Well fuck me for asking a question right? 200 notes and one helpful response. Thanks.

Oh sorry I thought you were being satirical (long story). Bear with me I’m not an ak expert btw.

This is an AK-47. It was designed by Mikhail Kalashnikov between 1945-1947 and adopted by the Soviet Armed Forces in 1949. It’s a select fire assault rifle that fires the Soviet 7.62x39 cartridge. The distinctive features of the AK-47 are it’s milled receiver and lack of muzzle device.

This is an AKM and AKMS (folding stock variant). The AKM is essentially an AK-47 but with some minor improvements. From what I could find it was adopted by the Soviet Armed Forces in 1959. The biggest changes are the inclusion of many new stamped parts such as the receiver to reduce weight and cost. It also has an improved gas system, was more accurate than the AK-47, has a reinforced dust cover, and features a distinctive slant cut muzzle break among other things. When most people say “AK-47” they’re actually referring to the AKM. It is a select fire rifle and fires the 7.62x39 cartridge just as the AK-47. The AKM is arguably the most popular rifle in the world.

This is an AK-74. It is yet another iteration of the AK-47. The AK74 was designed in 1974 and official adopted by the Soviet Armed Forces in 1979. It features the most drastic changes of any in the line up such as an improved bolt carrier, a new muzzle device, inclusion of bakealite parts, improved gas system, and the most significant change being of barrel and caliber. The AK-74 fires the Soviet 5.45x39 cartridge which was developed to compete with the NATO 5.56x45 round. It is select fire just as all other previous iterations.

This is the AK-74m. It’s a modernized version of the AK-74 (that’s what the M means). It’s a select fire rifle the fires the 5.45x39 cartridge. The AK-74m features accuracy improvements, polymer furniture, and a side folding stock (not shown). It is the current standard issue weapon for Russian Armed Forces. The AK-74m also has a variants in 5.56x45, 7.62x39, and 9x39 known as the AK101, AK103 and AK-9. There is also a special recoil reducing variant called the AK107. Russia is in the works of possibly replacing the AK-74m with a new rifle known as the AK-12.

Hope that helps answer your question.

Autor de la semana: Alejandro Jodorowsky Prullansky

Nació en Tocopilla, Chile, el 17 de febrero de 1929, es hijo del matrimonio de emigrantes judíos ucranianos. Tras vivir sus primeros diez años en Tocopilla, la familia se mudó en 1939 a Quinta Normal en Santiago. Jodorowsky cursó sus estudios secundarios en el Liceo de Aplicación. Publicó sus primeras poesías en torno a 1945. Se matriculó en 1947 en los cursos de Filosofía y Psicología de la Universidad de Chile, pero a los dos años los abandonó. En 1948 escribió su primer texto dramático: la pieza para títeres La fantasma cosquillosa. Entre 1949 y 1953 realizó en Santiago algunos actos improvisados —claros precedentes del happening (adelantándose a sus precursores de EE.UU, que no comienzan hasta 1952)— de corte surrealista, que luego calificó de efímeros (en México) y, a partir de 1962, efímeros pánicos en Francia. En 1950 fundó el Teatro de Títeres del Teatro Experimental de la Universidad de Chile (TEUCH) y dos años después, junto con Jorge Sanhueza, Jorge Berti, Roberto Humeres, Luis Oyarzún, Lihn y Parra crearon el collage Quebrantahuesos, poesía mural con recortes de periódicos.
Jodorowsky abandonó Chile en 1953 y viajó a París para estudiar panto-mima con Étienne Decroux, el profesor de Marcel Marceau. Debutó en el cine en 1957, con el cortometraje mimo La Cravate, alabado por Jean Cocteau. Después de presentarse en México en 1958, Jodorowsky decidió prolongar su estadía con el fin de conocer nuevos ambientes teatrales. Permaneció, aunque con intervalos, hasta 1974 en ese país, donde se interesó por temas psicológicos y místicos —lo que le llevaría a iniciarse en la psicoterapia al lado del prestigioso Erich Fromm en Cuernavaca y en la meditación zen con el maestro Ejo Takata— y dirigió más de un centenar de obras de vanguardia. Durante las siguientes dos décadas, Jodorowsky creó más de cien piezas de teatro.
Desde mediados de la década de 1970 formó parte del grupo de los Humanoides Asociados con otros guionistas y dibujantes especializados en el género fantástico y de ciencia ficción, vinculados a la revista Métal Hurlant.
En su filmografía llama especialmente la atención por ser impactante y transgresor. Con su segundo filme, El topo, estrenado en 1970 obtuvo reconocimiento internacional y John Lennon, a través de su representante Allen Klein, le ofreció distribuir y financiar parte de su siguiente proyecto: La montaña sagrada. Dune fue probablemente uno de los proyectos más ambiciosos de Jodorowsky, que trabajó en él durante más de 5 años y al que invitó a participar a Orson Welles y Salvador Dalí, pero el proyecto, retrasado infinidad de veces, fracasó. Le siguieron Santa sangre (1989). En 1988, conoció en un viaje promocional a Japón al célebre dibujante y cineasta Katsuhiro ?tomo, a quien le dio la idea para el impactante final de Akira, primer cómic manga en llevarse al cine con éxito mundial. Años más tarde Jodorowsky le ofreció al japonés la serie Megalex’, que finalmente dibujó el francés Fred Beltran (1999, 2002 y 2008). Con una filmografía escueta —ocho películas—, el cine de Jodorowsky manifiesta un universo creativo propio, en donde lo metafísico y lo terapéutico se dan la mano.
En junio de 2012, tras veintidós años sin dirigir, Jodorowsky comenzó a rodar en su Tocopilla natal la adaptación cinematográfica de los primeros capítulos de sus memorias, La danza de la realidad (que narran su infancia de 1929 a 1939). La película fue estrenada en el Festival de Cannes el 18 de mayo de 2013 dentro de la Quincena de Realizadores.
Jodorowsky ha escrito cinco novelas: El loro de siete lenguas (1991), Las ansias carnívoras de la nada (1995), Donde mejor canta un pájaro (1992), El niño del jueves negro (1999) y Albina y los hombres-perro (1999), que han sido traducidas a numerosos idiomas, entre ellos, al inglés, francés, alemán, italiano y portugués.
Actualmente vive en París donde da clases de tarot y conferencias sobre sus técnicas (la psicomagia y la psicogenealogía) en el cafe Le Téméraire. Está casado con la pintora y diseñadora francesa Pascale Montandon.

Kadına seçme-seçilme hakkı;

Fransa 1944
Japonya 1945
İtalya 1946
Çin 1947
İsviçre 1971
Kuveyt 2005
Türkiye 1930

bilmem anlatabildim mi?

4

In-depth: The BSA Machine-Carbine

On the 12th of April 1945, Birmingham Small Arms submitted their contender for the trials to find the replacement for the STEN gun in British service. Chambered for 9x19mm, the weapon used a blow-back mechanism but was cocked by sliding the odd-shaped fore-end forwards. The side-mounted magazine housing was hinged and thus when the weapon was not in use, the magazine could be folded in to make the weapon more portable. This feature could also be used to clear stoppages. The stock could fold snugly underneath the fore-end. It was demonstrated at Enfield and impressed the Ordnance Board; their only gripe with it was the weight.

In 1947, the weapon was trialed against the MCEM-3. The BSA was considered overweight but was easier to control than the MCEM-3. Feedback was sent to BSA and the weapon was modified in response. The new “Mk.II” BSA had a redesigned and more comfortable fore-end, a new curved magazine with a 30-round capacity and optional alternative means of cocking. The hinged magazine housing was ditched as a result of the curved magazine. The BSA Mk.II was trialed from the 8th - 16th of September 1947 against the MCEM-3, the Patchett Mk.II, and the Australian MCEM-1. The trials took place at Pendine and the results were not very promising. All the weapons suffered faults; the MCEM-3 overheated, the Patchett’s trigger mechanism failed, the Australian MCEM-1 fractured, and the BSA’s cocking mechanism was too stiff.

By the end of 1947, the weapons were improved and trialed again. This time, the BSA came out on top, and was advanced to the troop trial stages. The MCEM-3 was rejected. The BSA’s main competitor was the Patchett, which did not perform quite as well as the BSA but was still recommended for troop trials.

The Ordnance Board made an order for 100 BSA Mk.IIs but only recieved 6 since the manufacturing costs were so high. These weapons were examined by the Ordnance Board and they suggested that BSA improve the trigger mechanism before the troop trials, which they did. However, they also required that the BSA would need to have bayonet fittings in order to compete at the troop trials, and due to the design of the plastic fore-end covering the barrel, this could not be done without completely redesigning the fore-end. This proved to be a hindrance on the development of the weapon, and BSA was understandably unhappy with this sudden request.

It was not until May 1951 that the troop trials took place, and the competitors were the Madsen Model 50, the Australian MCEM-1, the Patchett and the new BSA Mk.III with a redesigned fore-end. The rigorous trials took their toll on each and every weapon except the Patchett. The Madsen’s magazine was susceptible to sand and mud, the Australian MCEM-1 fractured again and failed to eject at times, and the BSA Mk.III’s new fore-end proved troublesome in mud and was too stiff to cock. The Ordnance Board decided that the Patchett was the best weapon, and that it was not worth improving the BSA. BSA was not happy with this result and felt that the redesign of the fore-end to facilitate for a bayonet was unnecessary, and had impeded their design. BSA were so unsatisfied that they demanded that further trials take place in 1952, but the Ordnance Board were already set on adopting the Patchett.

It should be noted that this weapon is often referred to as the “BSA Model 1949″, but it was not designed or made in 1949. I don’t know where this name originates from, but it is incorrect. The three models of the weapon were called the Mk.I (1945), the Mk.II (1947), and the Mk.III (1951).

1886 - Drink Coca-Cola and enjoy it.
1904 - Delicious and refreshing.
1905 - Coca-Cola revives and sustains.
1906 - The great national temperance beverage.
1908 - Good til the last drop
1917 - Three million a day.
1922 - Thirst knows no season.
1923 - Enjoy life.
1924 - Refresh yourself.
1925 - Six million a day.
1926 - It had to be good to get where it is.
1927 - Pure as Sunlight
1927 - Around the corner from anywhere.
1928 - Coca-Cola … pure drink of natural flavors.
1929 - The pause that refreshes.
1932 - Ice-cold sunshine.
1937 - America’s favorite moment.
1938 - The best friend thirst ever had.
1938 - Thirst asks nothing more.
1939 - Coca-Cola goes along.
1939 - Coca-Cola has the taste thirst goes for.
1939 - Whoever you are, Whatever you do, think of good ice-cold Coca-Cola.
1941 - Coca-Cola is Coke!
1942 - The only thing like Coca-Cola is Coca-Cola itself.
1944 - How about a Coke?
1945 - Coke means Coca-Cola.
1945 - Passport to refreshment.
1947 - Coke knows no season.
1948 - Where there’s Coke there’s an ice cold.
1949 - Coca-Cola … along the highway to anywhere.
1952 - What you want is a Coke.
1954 - For people on the go.
1956 - Coca-Cola … makes good things taste better.
1957 - The sign of good taste.
1958 - The cold, crisp taste of Coke.
1959 - Coca-Cola refreshes you best.
1963 - Things go better with Coke.
1969 - It’s the real thing.
1975 - Look up, America.
1976 - Coke adds life.
1979 - Have a Coke and a smile (see also Hey Kid, Catch!)
1981 - Coke is it!
1985 - America’s real choice.
1986 - Red, white & you. (for Coca-Cola Classic)
1986 - Catch the wave. (for New Coke)
1987 - You can’t beat the feeling.
1993 - Always Coca-Cola.
1995 - Always and Only Coca-Cola.
1998 - Coca-Cola always the real thing!
1999 - Enjoy. (also used in the UK)
2001 - Life tastes good. (also used in the UK)
2003 - Real. (also used in the UK)
2005 - Make It Real. (also used in the UK)
2006 - The Coke Side of Life (also used in the UK)
2009 - Open Happiness (Until 2015)
2014 - Share A Coke