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Yerkes Observatory, Halley’s comet, 1910.

1. Yerkes Observatory, Halley’s comet (1P/1909 R1 1910 II 1909c).

2. Edward Emerson Barnard, Drawing (photograph copy) of the tail of Halley’s comet (1P/1909 R1 1910 II 1909c), by Edward Emerson Barnard, made the morning of May 19, 1910.

3. Mary Ross Calvert, Halley’s comet (1P/1909 R1 1910 II 1909c), showing division in the end of the tail.

4. Oliver Justin Lee, Halley’s comet (1P/1909 R1 1910 II 1909c), head and nucleus. Photographed with the 24-inch reflector telescope  (1 h 35 m exposure).

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Maria Alba (19 March 1910 – 26 October 1996), was a Spanish-American film actress. Originally named Maria Casajuana, she appeared in 25 feature films, including The Return of Chandu (1934), Kiss of Araby(1933) and La fuerza del querer(1930). Her most notable appearance was probably as “Saturday” in the 1932 Douglas Fairbanks film Mr. Robinson Crusoe. 

María de los Ángeles Félix Güereña (8 April 1914 – 8 April 2002) was a Mexican film actress. She is considered one of the most important female figures of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. She was also considered one of the most beautiful film actresses of her time, and one of the greatest erotic myths of Spanish-language cinema. She is known by the nickname La Doña a name derived from her character in the film Doña Bárbara (1943). She is also known as María Bonita. She completed a film career that included 47 films made in Mexico, Spain, France, Italy and Argentina.

Lupe Velez aka María Guadalupe Villalobos Vélez (July 18, 1908 – December 13, 1944) was a Mexican film actress.With the arrival of talkies, Vélez’s career took a turn towards comedy. Her characterization of the temperamental, explosive, rebellious and irreverent Latina woman gave her enormous popularity. She enjoyed popularity among Hispanic audiences and also made some films in Mexico. Some of her most memorable films are Lady of the Pavements (1928),The Wolf Song (1929), Palooka (1933), Laughing Boy (1934), Hollywood Party(1934) and the series of films created especially for her: Mexican Spitfire, in the early 1940s. She is associated with the nicknames “The Mexican Spitfire” and “The Hot Pepper”

Dolores del Río born María de los Dolores Asúnsolo López-Negrete; August 3, 1905 – April 11, 1983), was a Mexican film actress. She was a Hollywood star in the 1920s and 1930s, and was one of the most important female figures of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema in the 1940s and 1950s. She was the first Latin American female star to be recognized internationally.Her career flourished until the end of the silent era, with success in films such as Resurrection (1927) and Ramona (1928). In the 1930s, she was noted for her participation in musical films of the Pre-Code era like Bird of Paradise (1932), Flying Down to Rio (1933) and Madame Du Barry. When her Hollywood career began to decline, del Río decided to return to her native country and join the Mexican film industry, which at that time was at its peak.When del Río returned to Mexico she became the most important star of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. A series of films like Flor silvestre, María Candelaria (1943), Las Abandonadas and Bugambilia (1944) are considered classic masterpieces of the Mexican Cinema.

Carmen Miranda (9 February 1909 – 5 August 1955) was a Portuguese Brazilian samba singer, dancer, Broadway actress, and film star who was popular from the 1930s to the 1950s.In 1940, she made her first Hollywood film, Down Argentine Way, with Don Ameche and Betty Grable, her exotic clothing and Latin accent became her trademark. In the same year, she was voted the third most popular personality in the United States, and was invited to sing and dance for President Franklin Roosevelt, along with her group, Bando da Lua". Nicknamed “The Brazilian Bombshell”, Carmen Miranda is noted for her signature fruit hat outfit she wore in her American films, particularly in 1943's The Gang’s All Here. By 1945, she was the highest paid woman in the United States. Miranda made a total of fourteen Hollywood films between 1940 and 1953. Carmen Miranda was the first Latin American star to be invited to imprint her hands and feet in the courtyard of Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, in 1941. She became the first South American to be honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.She is considered the precursor of Brazil’s Tropicalismo cultural movement of the 1960s.

Sara Montiel (also Sarita Montiel or Saritísima; 10 March 1928 – 8 April 2013) was a Spanish singer and actress. She was a much-loved and internationally known name in the Spanish-speaking movie and music industries. Montiel was born in Campo de Criptana in the region of Castile–La Mancha in 1928 as María Antonia Abad (complete name María Antonia Alejandra Vicenta Elpidia Isidora Abad Fernández). After her unprecedented international hit in Juan de Orduña’s El Último Cuplé in 1957, Montiel achieved the status of mega-star in Europe and Latin America. She was the most commercially successful Spanish actress during the mid-20th century in much of the world. Miss Montiel’s film Varietes was banned in Beijing in 1973. Her films El Último Cuple and La Violetera netted the highest gross revenues ever recorded for films made in the Spanish speaking movie industry during the 1950s/60s. She played the role of Antonia, the niece of Don Quixote, in the 1947 Spanish film version of Cervantes’s great novel.

Maria Montez aka María Africa García Vidal de Santo Silas (6 June 1912 – 7 September 1951) was a Spaniard Dominican born motion picture actress who gained fame and popularity in the 1940s as an exotic beauty starring in a series of filmed-in-Technicolor costume adventure films. Her screen image was that of a hot-blooded Latin seductress, dressed in fanciful costumes and sparkling jewels. She became so identified with these adventure epics that she became known as “The Queen of Technicolor”. Over her career, Montez appeared in 26 films, 21 of which were made in North America and five in Europe.

Katy Juradoborn María Cristina Estela Marcela Jurado García (January 16, 1924 – July 5, 2002), was a Mexican actress who had a successful film career both in Mexico and in Hollywood.She worked with many Hollywood legends, including Gary Cooper in High Noon, Spencer Tracy in Broken Lance, and Marlon Brando in One-Eyed Jacks, and such respected directors as Fred Zinnemann (High Noon),Sam Peckinpah (Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid) and John Huston (Under the Volcano).Jurado made seventy-one films during her career. She became the first Latin American actress nominated for an Academy Award, as Best Supporting Actress for her work in 1954’s Broken Lance, and was the first to win a Golden Globe Award in 1952.

Rita Dolores Moreno (born December 11, 1931) is a Puerto Rican actress and singer. She is the only Hispanic and one of the few performers to have won all four major annual American entertainment awards, which include an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy and a Tony, and was the second Puerto Rican to win an Oscar. She appeared in small roles in The Toast of New Orleans and Singin’ in the Rain. In March 1954, Moreno was featured on the cover of Life Magazine with a caption, “Rita Moreno: An Actresses’ Catalog of Sex and Innocence”. in 1956, she had a supporting role in the film version of The King and I. In 1961, Moreno landed the role of Anita in West Side Story. She starred in Summer and Smoke (1961), Cry of Battle (1963), and afterwards, The Night of the Following Day (1968),Popi (1969), Marlowe (1969), Carnal Knowledge (1971) and The Ritz (1976). From 1971 to 1977, Moreno played many characters on the PBS children’s series.

Margaret Morris at the Opening of her Cromwell Road School, London, 1935. Photo by Fred Daniels. The Fergusson Gallery.

Morris was a pioneer of modern dance, as well as an accomplished choreographer, artist and author. In 1910, aged just 19, she established her own system for dance training, called Margaret Morris Movement, and opened her first school in London. It is still taught worldwide today.

Les Createurs de La Mode 1910 - 19- Salon de Vente - Worth


Charles Frederick Worth (13 October 1825 – 10 March 1895, widely considered the Father of Haute couture, was an English fashion designer of the 19th century, whose works were produced in Paris.

Born in Bourne, Lincolnshire, England, Worth made his mark in the French fashion industry. He worked at several prosperous London drapery shops before moving to Paris in 1846. He was hired by Gagelin and Opigez, well-known Parisian drapers. While working in their shop, he married one of the firm’s models, Marie Vernet. Marie would model shawls and bonnets for prospective customers. Worth made a few simple dresses for his wife and customers started to ask for copies of the dresses as well.

Worth, by now a junior partner in the firm, urged his partners to expand into dressmaking, but they hesitated to risk their reputation in a business as low-class as dressmaking. Worth found a wealthy Swede, Otto Bobergh, who was willing to bankroll the venture and opened the dressmaking establishment of Worth and Bobergh in 1858. Worth was soon patronized by the French Empress Eugénie, and after that by many titled, rich, and otherwise notable women. Catherine Walters[4] and Cora Pearl, the famous demimondaines, and Pauline von Metternich, an Austrian princess and musical patron, were Worth devotees, the infamous beauty Virginia Oldoini, Countess di Castiglione was often dressed by him. He also dressed actresses such as Sarah Bernhardt and singers such as Nellie Melba. Many of his customers travelled to Paris from other countries, coming from as far away as New York and Boston. Much of his work is associated with the movement to redefine the female fashionable shape, removing excessive ruffles and frills and using rich fabrics in simple but flattering outlines.He is credited as the first designer to put labels onto the clothing he manufactured.[5] Worth gave his customers luxurious materials and meticulous fit. Rather than let the customer dictate the design, as had previously been dressmaking practice, four times a year he displayed model dresses at fashion shows. His patronesses would pick a model, which would then be sewn in fabrics of their choice and tailored to their figure. Worth was sufficiently fashionable that he had to turn away customers. This only added to his éclat. He completely revolutionized the business of dressmaking. He was the first of the couturiers, dressmakers considered artists rather than mere artisans.

Worth and Bobergh shut down during the Franco-Prussian War and re-opened in 1871, without Bobergh, as the House of Worth. Worth took his sons, Gaston (founder of Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture) and Jean-Philippe, into his business and the couture house continued to flourish after his death in 1895.