1843)

anonymous asked:

heh loser i was born in 1843 and was alive like 180 years before you suck it :)))))))))

reblog if you’re a true 1800s kid

Sharing the News (1904). Eugen von Blaas (Austrian, 1843-1931). Oil on panel.

Von Blaas created tightly arranged compositions in which well-placed, richly described details hint at a larger narrative. In the present work, the wet stones and pile of coiled clothing on the ground suggest the laundress has been long at work. She is momentarily entertained by her red-haired, smiling companion sharing her correspondence — the page turned downward, the neatly painted text nearly, teasingly, legible for the viewer.

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David Marsh from Parks and gardens UK on glasshouse pioneer John Claudius Loudon (1783 - 1843):

Loudon’s most significant invention was a method of making glazing bars in wrought iron that could be made in curvilinear sections. The big breakthrough was to make them flexible enough to be bent in any direction without reducing their strength.  Suddenly curvilinear or even conical glazing was possible and the great age of glasshouses and conservatories was born.

This led to the publication of  Remarks on the Construction of Hot-Houses in 1817 and in 1818 A Comparative View of the Common and Curvilinear Mode of Roofing Hot-Houses and Sketches of Curvilinear Hot-Houses.

Unfortunately he sold the idea for the glazing bar  to  Messrs W. and D. Bailey of Holborn at an early stage.  They patented it in 1818 and so Loudon did not reap any financial reward from his invention, which is a pity since he was, despite all his publication, on the edge of bankruptcy much of his life.

Loudon collaborated with Baileys on a number of glasshouses in the following years. including Felton Park in Northumberland.

MARSH D., John Claudius Loudon…. and Greenhouse Technology

im looking up some facts abt yamazaki susumu in honor of jimmy’s bday and it’s making me so sad…. it doesn’t seem like anyone knows a whole lot about him, but he was a doctor and the physician he studied under, matsumoto jun, described him as gentle and taciturn. he also studied literary and military arts under his uncle growing up. and he was apparently one of the most loyal and trusted members of the shinsengumi, and was loved by kondo. he even got along really well with saito hajime (shimaru’s historical counterpart), who was known to be very introverted. 

and after he died in the line of duty, kondo isami (or possibly hijikata toshizou? i could only find two accounts of this and they conflicted with one another) gave a very tearful condolence speech in his honor…. everyone else apparently cried, too…. and he died pretty young, probably in his thirties (although wikipedia lists his birth year as 1843, which would have made him 25, but that… doesn’t really make sense, since the general consensus seems to be that he was probably two or three years older than hijikata, who was born ten years before that). 

he just sounds like such a nice guy, loved by all, and everyone was apparently really heartbroken when he died…

Lola Montez
Photography Studio: Southworth and Hawes (American, active 1843–1863)
Artist: Albert Sands Southworth (American, West Fairlee, Vermont 1811–1894 Charlestown, Massachusetts)
Artist: Josiah Johnson Hawes (American, Wayland, Massachusetts 1808–1901 Crawford Notch, New Hampshire)
Date: ca. 1850
Medium: Daguerreotype

The Met

Rufus Choate
Photography Studio: Southworth and Hawes (American, active 1843–1863)
Artist: Albert Sands Southworth (American, West Fairlee, Vermont 1811–1894 Charlestown, Massachusetts)
Artist: Josiah Johnson Hawes (American, Wayland, Massachusetts 1808–1901 Crawford Notch, New Hampshire)
Date: ca. 1850
Medium: Daguerreotype

The Met

The Momentous Question (1893). William Harris Weatherhead (British, 1843-1903). Watercolour.

A young woman, dressed simply and wearing an apron, puts her sewing aside to read again her letter and, as the title suggests, is faced with a momentous decision. Perhaps a young man has asked by post for her hand in marriage.

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Paul Lormier: Seven costume designs for Dietsch’s Le Vaisseau Fantôme ou le maudit des mers, dated 1842. After Richard Wagner submitted to him the scenario Le hollandais volant (The Flying Duchtman), the Director of Paris Opéra became interested… but decided to commission the opera to other composer and libretist. Dietsch’s opera was first performed in 1842 and soon forgotten. Wagner’s Die Fliegende Holländer premiered in 1843. For you interested, there’s a recording of Diescht (coupled with Wagner’s original version of Die Fliegende Holländer) conducted by Minkowski.

Gallica