1817

Bertel Thorvaldsen (1770-1844)
“Ganymede with Jupiter’s Eagle” (1817)
Marble sculpture
Located in the Thorvaldsen Museum, Copenhagen, Denmark

In Greek mythology the boy Ganymede was carried up into the sky, to the home of the gods on Olympus to be the gods’ taster. According to legend it was Zeus, in the shape of an eagle, who took the beautiful boy from Phrygia in the north-western part of Asia Minor (Turkey). Ganymede was to take the place of Hebe as the taster of the gods, because she spilled the drink – the nectar – that made the gods immortal.

J. M. W. Turner (1775-1851)
“Mount Vesuvius in Eruption” (1817)
Watercolor on paper
Romanticism
Located in the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Connecticut, United States

10

John Martin (1789–1854, England)

Dramatic landscapes 2

John Martin was an English Romantic painter and one of the most popular artists of his day. He was celebrated for his typically vast and melodramatic paintings of religious subjects and fantastic compositions, populated with minute figures placed in imposing landscapes. His dramatic and subjective style of composition was in stark contrast to the emerging schools of naturalism and realism, which led his work to fall out of critical favour soon after his death, however a revival in interest has occured towards the end of the 20th century, and now his major works are popular pieces of many museum’s collections.