1632 1675

4

Hogwarts Houses + paintings (x):

Gryffindor:

Mary Magdalene in Ecstasy, Caravaggio  (1606)
Nude Sitting on a Divan, Amedeo Modigliani (1917)
Lolotte, Amedeo Modigliani (1916)
The Martyrdom of Saint Matthew, Caravaggio (1599–1600)
Narcissus, Caravaggio (1597–1599)
La petite Marie, Amadeo Modigliani (1918)

Hufflepuff:

Mistress and Maid, Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675)
Wheatfield with Crows, Vincent Van Gogh (1890)
The Starry Night, Vincent Van Gogh (1889)
View of Delft, Johannes Vermeer (1660–1661)
Girl with a Pearl Earring, Johannes Vermeer (c. 1665)
Vase with Twelve Sunflowers, Vincent Van Gogh (1888)

Ravenclaw:

A Mermaid, John William Waterhouse (1901)
Arm of the Seine at Giverny, Claude Monet (1887)
Waterlilies, Green Reflection, Left Part, Claude Monet (1916-1923)
Borea, John William Waterhouse (1903)
Listen to my Sweet Pipings, John William Waterhouse (1911)
The Healing of a Nation, Claude Monet (1918)

Slytherin:

Snow Storm: Hannibal and his Army Crossing the Alps, William Turner (1812)
Lady in Ermine, Giacomo Grosso (c. 1990)
Supremo convegno, Giacomo Grosso (1895)
Fishermen at Sea, William Turner (1796)
The Shipwreck, William Turner (1805)
Nude, Andrew Loomis (i don’t found it)

Lady at the Virginals with a Gentleman (early 1660s). Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632-1675). Oil on canvas. Royal Collection Trust.

Light is admitted through the windows on the left and fills the room, casting only soft, subtle shadows. A striking feature of the composition in this part is the mirror on the wall where the slightly blurred reflections include the young woman’s face, part of the table and the legs of an artist’s easel. The implication of this glimpsed easel is that Vermeer shares the same space as the figures he is depicting, but he is also, like the viewer, standing outside that space.

Lady Writing a Letter with Her Maid (c.1670). Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632-1675). Oil on canvas. Gallery of Ireland. 

The firm stance of the statuesque maid acts as a counterweight to the lively mistress intent on writing her letter. The maid’s gravity is emphasized by her central position in the composition. In contrast, the mistress inclines dynamically against the compressed space on the right. The mistress is painted in precise, meticulous strokes as opposed to the broad handling of the brush used to depict the maid.

Woman Reading a Letter (c.1663). Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632-1675). Oil on canvas. Rijksmuseum.

Enjoying a quiet, private moment, this young woman is absorbed in reading a letter in the morning light. She is still wearing her blue night jacket. All of the colours in the composition are secondary to its radiant lapis lazuli blue. Vermeer recorded the effects of light with extraordinary precision. Particularly innovative is his rendering of the woman’s skin with pale grey, and the shadows on the wall using light blue.