16 miles!

Hey guys, I’ve started a new job that pays really well at an Escape Room (a place you go to get locked into a room for an hour and then figure out puzzles to escape) ! Unfortunately, I’m not gonna be paid until next week, and I need money now to cover Uber costs (which will fade out over time once I get this second job at a warehouse I’m currently processing for and then I can afford a car). I’m hoping I can ask for donations to help me out? I’ve been walking home every other day to mitigate costs, but it’s about 8 miles away… so 16 miles back and forth… … so u h yea h. .…

This is also gonna go into food because I’ve been portioning one meal per day and I don’t think that’s very healthy and I’m also hungry a lot and that sucks 

WHo knew transitioning back from homeless would be so hard HAHAH hah  a …. 

anyway here’s the link:  paypal.me/owengreynorris

i’m sorry about asking for help so much. i’ve been sleeping on literally a floor and my shoes have a literal hole in them but I don’t have anyone else to help me out and I’m trying to stay in school the best I can. 

Incoming! We’ve Got Science from Jupiter!

Our Juno spacecraft has just released some exciting new science from its first close flyby of Jupiter! 

In case you don’t know, the Juno spacecraft entered orbit around the gas giant on July 4, 2016…about a year ago. Since then, it has been collecting data and images from this unique vantage point.

Juno is in a polar orbit around Jupiter, which means that the majority of each orbit is spent well away from the gas giant. But once every 53 days its trajectory approaches Jupiter from above its north pole, where it begins a close two-hour transit flying north to south with its eight science instruments collecting data and its JunoCam camera snapping pictures.

Space Fact: The download of six megabytes of data collected during the two-hour transit can take one-and-a-half days!

Juno and her cloud-piercing science instruments are helping us get a better understanding of the processes happening on Jupiter. These new results portray the planet as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world that we still need to study and unravel its mysteries.

So what did this first science flyby tell us? Let’s break it down…

1. Tumultuous Cyclones

Juno’s imager, JunoCam, has showed us that both of Jupiter’s poles are covered in tumultuous cyclones and anticyclone storms, densely clustered and rubbing together. Some of these storms as large as Earth!

These storms are still puzzling. We’re still not exactly sure how they formed or how they interact with each other. Future close flybys will help us better understand these mysterious cyclones. 

Seen above, waves of clouds (at 37.8 degrees latitude) dominate this three-dimensional Jovian cloudscape. JunoCam obtained this enhanced-color picture on May 19, 2017, at 5:50 UTC from an altitude of 5,500 miles (8,900 kilometers). Details as small as 4 miles (6 kilometers) across can be identified in this image.

An even closer view of the same image shows small bright high clouds that are about 16 miles (25 kilometers) across and in some areas appear to form “squall lines” (a narrow band of high winds and storms associated with a cold front). On Jupiter, clouds this high are almost certainly comprised of water and/or ammonia ice.

2. Jupiter’s Atmosphere

Juno’s Microwave Radiometer is an instrument that samples the thermal microwave radiation from Jupiter’s atmosphere from the tops of the ammonia clouds to deep within its atmosphere.

Data from this instrument suggest that the ammonia is quite variable and continues to increase as far down as we can see with MWR, which is a few hundred kilometers. In the cut-out image below, orange signifies high ammonia abundance and blue signifies low ammonia abundance. Jupiter appears to have a band around its equator high in ammonia abundance, with a column shown in orange.

Why does this ammonia matter? Well, ammonia is a good tracer of other relatively rare gases and fluids in the atmosphere…like water. Understanding the relative abundances of these materials helps us have a better idea of how and when Jupiter formed in the early solar system.

This instrument has also given us more information about Jupiter’s iconic belts and zones. Data suggest that the belt near Jupiter’s equator penetrates all the way down, while the belts and zones at other latitudes seem to evolve to other structures.

3. Stronger-Than-Expected Magnetic Field

Prior to Juno, it was known that Jupiter had the most intense magnetic field in the solar system…but measurements from Juno’s magnetometer investigation (MAG) indicate that the gas giant’s magnetic field is even stronger than models expected, and more irregular in shape.

At 7.766 Gauss, it is about 10 times stronger than the strongest magnetic field found on Earth! What is Gauss? Magnetic field strengths are measured in units called Gauss or Teslas. A magnetic field with a strength of 10,000 Gauss also has a strength of 1 Tesla.  

Juno is giving us a unique view of the magnetic field close to Jupiter that we’ve never had before. For example, data from the spacecraft (displayed in the graphic above) suggests that the planet’s magnetic field is “lumpy”, meaning its stronger in some places and weaker in others. This uneven distribution suggests that the field might be generated by dynamo action (where the motion of electrically conducting fluid creates a self-sustaining magnetic field) closer to the surface, above the layer of metallic hydrogen. Juno’s orbital track is illustrated with the black curve. 

4. Sounds of Jupiter

Juno also observed plasma wave signals from Jupiter’s ionosphere. This movie shows results from Juno’s radio wave detector that were recorded while it passed close to Jupiter. Waves in the plasma (the charged gas) in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter have different frequencies that depend on the types of ions present, and their densities. 

Mapping out these ions in the jovian system helps us understand how the upper atmosphere works including the aurora. Beyond the visual representation of the data, the data have been made into sounds where the frequencies
and playback speed have been shifted to be audible to human ears.

5. Jovian “Southern Lights”

The complexity and richness of Jupiter’s “southern lights” (also known as auroras) are on display in this animation of false-color maps from our Juno spacecraft. Auroras result when energetic electrons from the magnetosphere crash into the molecular hydrogen in the Jovian upper atmosphere. The data for this animation were obtained by Juno’s Ultraviolet Spectrograph. 

During Juno’s next flyby on July 11, the spacecraft will fly directly over one of the most iconic features in the entire solar system – one that every school kid knows – Jupiter’s Great Red Spot! If anybody is going to get to the bottom of what is going on below those mammoth swirling crimson cloud tops, it’s Juno.

Stay updated on all things Juno and Jupiter by following along on social media:
Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Tumblr

Learn more about the Juno spacecraft and its mission at Jupiter HERE.

LGBT content guide (TV shows , Movies , Music , Books, Youtube , celebrities)

Hey guys , I realised that a lot of people on here(including me) are always looking for new shows, moviee , music or youtuve channels with lgbt content to watch (as they can relate more to such content) so i decided to make a list of all those which I know.

Ps. This list is of what all I know and can remember. Pls reblog and add whatever i missed!

TV shows with WLW/bisexual female characters
1. Supergirl
2. Humans
3. Pretty little liars
4. Famous in Love
5. Sense 8
6. Orphan Black
7. Orange is the new black
8. Carmilla (web series)
9. Game of Thrones
10. Veep
11. How to get away with murder
12. Empire
13. Arrow
14. DC legends of tomorrow
15. Black Sails
16. Jane The Virgin
17. Faking It
18. Wynnona Earp
19. Lost Girl
20. Doctor Who s10
21. Glee

22. Person of interest 23. Greys anatomy 24. The fosters

Tv shows witg MLM/bisexual Male tv characters
1. Shadowhunters
2. Riverdale
3. Orphan Black
4. How To Get Away With Murder
5. Empire
6. Game Of Thrones
7. Brookly 99 8. Sense8 9. Glee

Trans characters 1. Transparent 2. Sense8

Youtube channels with LGBT content-
1.RoseEllenDix (Rose)
2.Roxetrawr (Rosie)
3.Tyler Oakley
4. ShaneDawsonTV
5. JoeyGraceffa
6. CammieScott
7. Nowthisisliving (Shannon)
8. Stevie Boebi
9. Ally Hills
10. Alexis G Zall
11. Melanie Murphy
12. Troye Sivan
13. Hannah Hart
14. Ingrid Nilsen
15. Miles Chronicles
16. ElloSteph
17. AmyOrdman

Musicians who generally make LGBT music
1. Troye Sivan
2. Hayley kiyoko
3. Mary Lambert
4. Tegan and Sara

Movies with LGBT content-
1. Carol(2015)
2. But i am a cheerleader
3. I cant think straight
4. DEBS
5. Loving Annabelle
6. Bound

Books-
1. Annie on my mind by Nancy Garden
2. The price of salt (carol) by Patricia Highsmith
3. Ash by Malindo Lo
4. Tipping the Velvet by Sarah Waters
5. Fingersmith by Sarah Waters
6. Madam President by Blayne Cooper
7. The Mortal Instruments by Cassandra Clare 8. Ask the passeners by A S King

Out and proud celebs - 1.Lauren Jauregui (singer) 2.Kristen Stewart (actress) 3.Ricky Martin (singer) 4.Halsey (singer) 5.Miley Cyrus ( singer and actress) 6.demi lovato (singer and actress) 7. Cara delevingne (voctoria’s secret angel and actress) 8. Stella maxwell(victoria’s secret angel) 9. Angelina Jolie (actress) 10. Sir Elton John(singer) 11. Lady gaga (singer) 12. Sarah Paulson (actress) 13. Kate McKinnon (comedian actress) 14. Ellen DeGeneres(tv show host , comedian) 15. Portia DeRossi (actress)

These were all I was aware of and could think of. Pls reblog and add those you know

Solar System: Things to Know This Week

Not to be—ahem—eclipsed, the Perseids meteor shower peaks annually in mid-August and is considered the most popular meteor shower of the year. 

This week, 10 things you need to know about this beautiful nighttime show and how to catch a front-row seat.

1. Light in August

In this 30 second exposure, a meteor streaks across the sky during the annual Perseid meteor shower Friday, Aug. 12, 2016 in Spruce Knob, West Virginia. The Perseids show up every year in August when Earth ventures through trails of debris left behind by an ancient comet. Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

With very fast and bright meteors, Perseids (pronounced PURR-see-ids) frequently leave long “wakes” of light and color behind them as they streak through Earth’s atmosphere. Perseids are one of the most plentiful showers, with between 50-100 meteors seen each hour, and occur with warm summer nighttime weather, allowing sky watchers to easily view them.

2. Show Schedule

You can see the Perseids this year between now and Aug. 24, 2017, but mark your calendars for peak dates Aug. 12 and 13. This year, the waning gibbous moon rises about midnight local time, which will cut the expected rates in half this year (25 to 50 per hour at the peak from a very dark sky). But the Perseids are so bright and numerous that it should still be a good show.

3. Night Owls Welcome

The Perseids (and every meteor shower) are best viewed in the Northern Hemisphere between 11 p.m. - 3 a.m. Come prepared with a sleeping bag, blanket or lawn chair.

4. Look Up

Find an area well away from city or street lights and set up where you’re shadowed from the moon’s glare. Face whatever direction you like, ideally the one unobstructed by trees, buildings or moonlight. Look up, taking in as much of the sky as possible. If you have a group, each person should look in different parts of the sky. After about 30 minutes in the dark, your eyes will adapt, and you’ll begin to see fainter objects, including meteors. Be patient; the show will last until dawn, so you have plenty of time to catch a glimpse.

5. Functional Fashion

Pack a baseball cap and wear it sideways to cover any glare from the moon. The waning gibbous moon will block out many of the fainter meteors this year, but the Perseids are so bright and numerous that it should still be a good show.

6. Meteor Matters

Where do meteors come from? Some originate from leftover comet particles and bits of broken asteroids. When comets come around the sun, they leave a dusty trail behind them. Every year, Earth passes through these debris trails, which allows the bits to collide with our atmosphere and disintegrate to create fiery and colorful streaks in the sky. But the vast majority of meteors don’t come from meteor showers—instead, they randomly fall all of the time.

7. Origins

The pieces of space debris that interact with our atmosphere to create the Perseids originate from Comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle. Swift-Tuttle takes 133 years to orbit the sun once, and Comet Swift-Tuttle last visited the inner solar system in 1992. Swift-Tuttle is a large comet: its nucleus is 16 miles (26 kilometers) across. This is almost twice the size of the object hypothesized to have wiped out the dinosaurs.

8. Discoverers

Comet Swift-Tuttle was discovered in 1862 by Lewis Swift and Horace Tuttle. In 1865, Giovanni Schiaparelli realized that this comet was the source of the Perseids.

9. Great Balls of Fire

The Perseids are known for fireballs, which are large explosions of light and color that last longer than an average meteor streak. Why? They originate from bigger particles of cometary material.

10. Sky Map

The point in the sky from which the Perseids appear to come from—also known as their radiant—is the constellation Perseus. But don’t get confused: The constellation name only helps viewers figure out which shower they’re viewing on a given night; it’s not the source of the meteors (see #6 for that answer!).

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

Solar System: Things to Know This Week

Get the latest on women making history at NASA, our Juno mission, the Curiosity rover and move!

1. Women at NASA Making History, Creating the Future

Throughout Women’s History Month, we’ve been presenting profiles of the women who are leading the way in deep space exploration.

+ Meet some of them

2. Juno and the Giant

Our Juno spacecraft made its fifth close flyby over giant Jupiter’s mysterious cloud tops.

+ See the latest from the King of Planets

3. When the Road Gets Rough, the Tough Keep Rolling

A routine check of the aluminum wheels on our Curiosity Mars rover has found two small breaks on the rover’s left middle wheel tread–the latest sign of wear and tear as the rover continues its journey, now approaching the 10-mile (16 kilometer) mark. But there’s no sign the robotic geologist won’t keep roving right through its ongoing mission.

+ Get the full report

4. What Do Mars and Dinosaurs Have in Common?

Our research reveals that volcanic activity at the giant Martian volcano Arsia Mons ceased about 50 million years ago, around the time of Earth’s Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction, when large numbers of plant and animal species (including dinosaurs) went extinct. However, there’s no reason to think the two events were more than a cosmic coincidence.

+ Learn how scientists pieced together the past

5. A Comet in Commotion

Images returned from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission indicate that during its most recent trip through the inner solar system, the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was a very active place – full of growing fractures, collapsing cliffs and massive rolling boulders.

+ See the many faces of Comet #67P

6. Next Generation Space Robot is Ingenious, Versatile–and Cute

The next rovers to explore another planet might bring along a scout. The Pop-Up Flat Folding Explorer Robot (PUFFER) in development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was inspired by origami. Its lightweight design is capable of flattening itself, tucking in its wheels and crawling into places rovers can’t fit.

+ Meet PUFFER

7. Shadowy Dawn

According to data from our Dawn mission to Ceres, shadowed craters on the dwarf planet may be linked to the history of how the small world has been tilted over time by the gravity of planets like Jupiter.

+ Find out how understanding “cycles of obliquity” might solve solar system mysteries

8. On Orbit and Online

We’re developing a  long-term technology demonstration project of what could become the high-speed internet of the sky. The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) will help engineers understand the best ways to operate laser communications systems, which could enable much higher data rates for connections between spacecraft and Earth, such as scientific data downlink and astronaut communications.

+ See how it will work

9. A Big Role for Small Sats in Deep Space Exploration

We selected 10 studies to develop mission concepts using CubeSats and other kinds of very small satellites to investigate Venus, Earth’s moon, asteroids, Mars and the outer planets. “These small but mighty satellites have the potential to enable transformational science,” said Jim Green, director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division.

+ Get the small details

10. Rings Around the Red Planet?

It’s possible that one of our closest neighbors had rings at one point – and may have them again someday. At least, that’s the theory put forth by NASA-funded scientists at Purdue University.

+ See more details about the once and future rings of Mars

Discover more lists of 10 things to know about our solar system HERE.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

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Rujm el-Hiri, Israel

Rujm el-Hiri is an ancient megalithic monument, consisting of concentric circles of stone with a tumulus at its center. It is located in the Israeli-occupied portion of the Golan Heights, some 9.9 miles (16 km) east of the coast of the Sea of Galilee, in the middle of a large plateau covered with hundreds of dolmen. Rujm el-Hiri means “stone heap of the wild cat” in Arabic. In Hebrew the structure is named Gilgal Refaim, which means the “wheel of Refaim.” The Refaim were an ancient race of giants, mentioned in the Bible. The word “refaim” in modern Hebrew also means “ghosts” or “spirits.”

Made up of more than 42,000 basalt rocks arranged in concentric circles, it has a mound 15 feet (4.6 m) tall at its center. Some circles are complete, others incomplete. The outermost wall is 520 feet (160 m) in diameter and 8 feet (2.4 m) high. The establishment of the site, and other nearby ancient settlements, is dated by archaeologists to the Early Bronze Age II period (3000–2700 BC).

Since excavations have yielded very few material remains, Israeli archeologists theorize that the site was not a defensive position or a residential quarter but most likely a ritual center, possibly linked to the cult of the dead. However, there is no consensus regarding its function, as no similar structure has been found in the Near East.

20 Things You Should Know About Hey Arnold! on Its 20th Anniversary

Believe it or not, it’s been 20 years since Hey Arnold! first premiered on Nickelodeon! That’s right — on October 7, 1996, everyone’s favorite football head graced our TV screens, bringing his tall-haired best friend, an angry unibrowed little girl and a gaggle of other weird, wonderful characters along for the ride. To celebrate, we put together a list of fun facts you should know about the series. Read on, and enjoy Hey Arnold! every night on The Splat!

1. Hey Arnold! began as a series of claymation shorts creator Craig Bartlett developed independently. The third short was made for Sesame Street.

2. Craig and a handful of other Hey Arnold! alumni also worked on another Nickelodeon show — Rugrats.

3. Jim Lang, the composer for Hey Arnold!, actually wrote the melody for the theme song back in the 1970s, originally imagining it as the music for a Dunkin’ Donuts commercial.

4. A lot of Craig’s original Hey Arnold! staff, including Raymie Muzquiz, Jerry Richardson, Steve Lowtwait and Miyuki Hoshikawa returned to work on The Jungle Movie.

5. Hey Arnold! was the first Nickelodeon cartoon to use child voice actors.

6. During Hey Arnold!’s run, four different voice actors played the role of Arnold (five, if you count the pilot).

7. When designing Gerald, Craig decided that because Arnold was short and wide, his best friend should be tall and skinny.

8. The G. in Helga G. Pataki stands for “Geraldine” — as in Geraldine Laybourne, a member of the team that created Nickelodeon.

9. Only four Hey Arnold! characters know for sure that Helga loves Arnold: Dr. Bliss, Lila, Phoebe and Brainy.

10. Each girl character on Hey Arnold! was based on a real-life crush the creator had when he was younger.

11. The studio Hey Arnold! was produced in was located on 4040 Vineland Street. In the show, the boarding house is on 4040 Vine street.

12. Hillwood, the city in Hey Arnold!, was named after the elementary school Craig attended in Seattle.

13. Craig based Arnold’s city after Seattle (his hometown), Portland (where he went to art school) and Brooklyn (where he has relatives).

14. Painter Edward Hopper (who is mentioned in “Helga on the Couch”) is part of the inspiration for the Hillwood cityscape.

15. Craig voiced a number of characters, including Brainy, Abner, Ned the radio DJ and Arnold’s dad, Miles.

16. Ned’s look is also based off the appearance of Craig.

17. Originally, Arnold had no last name, but as a joke the writers settled on “Shortman” — Grandpa Phil’s nickname for his grandson.

18. PS 118’s school colors are green and orange.

19. Though many thought Arnold was wearing a kilt, it was really just a long button-down shirt under his sweater.

20. Hey Arnold! has saved lives! After a little girl watched the episode “Eugene’s Bike,” in which Eugene nearly chokes on a hotdog until Arnold gives him the Heimlich Maneuver, she used the same move on a friend who was choking on a jawbreaker.

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March 9th 1945: Bombing of Tokyo begins

On this day in 1945, the bombing of Tokyo by the United States Air Forces began. There had been raids by B-29 bombers since November 1944, but this was one of the most destructive in history. The raid on the night of March 9th saw 334 B-29s take off in Operation Meetinghouse, with 279 of them dropping around 1,700 tons of bombs. 16 square miles of the Japanese capital were destroyed, around a million were left homeless and around 100,000 people died as a result of the firestorm. Tokyo saw many raids such as this, with over 50% of Tokyo being destroyed by the end of the Second World War. However the firebombing on the night of March 9/10th was the single deadliest air raid of the war; the immediate deaths were higher than seen at Dresden, Hiroshima or Nagasaki as single events.

“Killing Japanese didn’t bother me very much at that time… I suppose if I had lost the war, I would have been tried as a war criminal…. Every soldier thinks something of the moral aspects of what he is doing. But all war is immoral and if you let that bother you, you’re not a good soldier.“
- Curtis LeMay, the American general behind the firebombing campaign