1550's

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Women’s Art History Masterpost

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, feminist art scholar and research specialist at the Getty Research Institute, Anja Foerschner, selected key publications and journals for those want to explore art by women and feminist art.

The Feminist Art Journal (produced from 1972 to 1977).

The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community by Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Selma James (1975).

Woman Artists 1550–1950 by Ann S. Harris (1977).

Chrysalis: A Magazine of Women’s Culture. (Produced from 1977 to 1980).
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Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology by Arlene Raven, Cassandra Langer, and Joanna Ellen Frueh (1988).

Women, Art, and Power: And other Essays by Linda Nochlin (1988).

Women, Art, and Society by Whitney Chadwick (1990).

Art on My Mind: Visual Politics by Bell Hooks (1995).

Woven by the Grandmothers: Nineteenth-Century Navajo Textiles from the National Museum of the American Indian by Eulalie H. Bonar (1996).

Sexual Politics: Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party in Feminist Art History by Amelia Jones and Laura Cottingham (1996).

Beyond the Flower: The Autobiography of a Feminist Artist by Judy Chicago (1997).

Angry Women by Andrea Juno and V. Vale (1999).

Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History by Harmony Hammond (2000).

Black Feminist Cultural Criticism by Jacqueline Bobo (2001).

The Black Female Body: A Photographic History by Deborah Willis and Carla Williams (2002).

Art/Women/California, 1950–2000: Parallels and Intersections by Diana Burgess Fuller and Daniela Salvioni (2002).

Dark Designs and Visual Culture by Michele Wallace (2004).

Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York by Midori Yoshimoto (2005).

WACK!: Art and the Feminist Revolution by Cornelia Butler and Lisa Gabrielle Mark (2007).

The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America by Charmaine A. Nelson (2007).

Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altarities by Laura E. Pérez (2007).

Ana Mendieta by María Ruido (2008).

Visual and Other Pleasures by L. Mulvey (2009).

Modern Women: Women artists at the Museum of Modern Art by Cornelia H. Butler and Alexandra Schwartz (2010).

EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art by Kellie Jones (2011).

Women Building History: Public Art at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Wanda M. Corn, Charlene G. Garfinkle, and Annelise K. Madsen (2011).

After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art by Eleanor Heartney, Helaine Posner, Nancy Princenthal, Sue Scott, Linda Nochlin (2013).

Visualizing Guadalupe: From Black Madonna to Queen of the Americas by Jeanette Favrot Peterson (2014).

Live Form: Women, Ceramics, and Community by Jenni Sorkin (2016).


We want this list to grow, so please reblog with your favorite resources on art by women and feminist art.

The Heart Book is regarded as the oldest Danish ballad manuscript. It is a collection of 83 love ballads compiled in the beginning of the 1550’s in the circle of the Court of King Christian III.

Shown above is the beginning of ballad no. 43. 

Store længsel, du går mig nær (Great Yearning, thou touches me). 

A later reader – the otherwise unknown Christen Masse – has added some notes, i.a. this pious hope: “gvd ende oc vinde alle mit er lende til en god oc gledelig ende amen” (may god end and turn my misery into a good and happy ending amen).

We do not know who compiled the ballads and instigated the writing of the Heart Book. All ballads except one – no. 66 – have probably been written by the same hand.

19.5 x 15 cm.

16th Century Book Can Be Read Six Different Ways

It’s not everyday you see a book that can be read in six completely different ways, and this small book from the National Library of Sweden is definitely an anomaly. According to Medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel, this 16th century text has a special sixfold dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding with strategically placed clasps that makes it possible for six books to be neatly bound into one. This particular book contains devotional texts, including Martin Luther’s Der kleine Catechismus, which was printed in German between the 1550’s and 1570’s.

While it could be hard to keep your place in this book, you can’t ignore that the engineering of it is quite a feat. In the age of the Kindle, Nook, and iPad, it’s a nice reminder of handcrafted ingenuity.

6

Lady Jane Grey, interpreted from the ‘Streatham Painting’ of Lady Jane Grey.

This costume was my final piece at university. Ever since I was a little girl I had been fascinated by Lady Jane Grey, I find her inspirational and tragic all in one, she truly is an enigma. I’ll admit back then I was caught up in the romance and heartbreak of the film ‘Lady Jane’ (but who wasn’t?). 

This gown has about 23 meters of burgundy cotton velvet, about 6 meters of damask and countless meters of black cotton, cotton drill and endless amounts of Steele bones. To go under the gown is a complete let of Tudor underwear; chemise, corset, farthingale and two petticoats. A small jacket called a ‘partlet’ is worn over the gown, I hand embroidered and beaded this. On her head (and my favorite part) is a ‘French Hood’ with gold and black billiments. 

I absolutely loved making this costume but it was one hell of a challenge! 

The Heart Book is regarded as the oldest Danish ballad manuscript. It is a collection of 83 love ballads compiled in the beginning of the 1550’s in the circle of the Court of King Christian III.

Shown above is the beginning of ballad no. 43, Store længsel, du går mig nær (Great Yearning, thou touches me). A later reader – the otherwise unknown Christen Masse – has added some notes, i.a. this pious hope: “gvd ende oc vinde alle mit er lende til en god oc gledelig ende amen” (may god end and turn my misery into a good and happy ending amen). 

We do not know who compiled the ballads and instigated the writing of the Heart Book. All ballads except one – no. 66 – have probably been written by the same hand.

19.5 x 15 cm.

Titian in a turban: Art historians say painter hid a portrait of himself in grisly masterpiece

‘Self-portrait’ in corner of the 15ft canvas has gone unnoticed for 450 years

  • The Martyrdom of St Lawrence has undergone a year-long restoration

By ROB COOPER

It’s a macabre scene depicting St Lawrence being slowly burnt to death over a blazing fire.

It has emerged Renaissance artist Titian may have painted himself into the grim scene.

Experts restoring his 15ft-high The Martyrdom of St Lawrence have uncovered a man in a turban in the bottom corner.



Artist’s face? The Martyrdom of St Lawrence, which has undergone a year-long restoration, apparently shows artist Titian’s face in the bottom-left corner

The man’s face, tilted upwards and looking towards the burning man, bears a looks remarkably likeness to the artist himself.

Titian completed the work in the late 1550s – but the apparent self-portrait has gone undetected for more than 450 years, the Daily Telegraph reported.


St Lawrence, one of the seven deacons of Ancient Rome, was martyred in 258 for his beliefs.

Professor Lionello Puppi, a Titian expert, said the man’s face in the corner looked incredibly like that of the artist.


‘The similarity with the profile, and particularly the long, slightly hooked nose, is very striking,’ he told the Daily Telegraph.

‘We believe it may very well be a self-portrait by Titian. It is still to be verified and we are studying the archives to see if there are any other clues which might back it up.

‘The key question of course is why he would have included himself in the painting.’

Titian was born in around 1488 and named Tiziano Vecellio.

The painting was completed over more than a decade between around 1546 and 1558s.

Titian would have been aged in his late 50s or 60s at the time – about the same age as the man who appears in the bottom left hand corner of the portrait.

The work, estimated to be worth £40million, has undergone a year-long restoration programme.

The work is on display in Alba, north-east Italy, until August when it will return to Venice and the Church of the Jesuits.

Carvaggio, another Renaissance artist, also included himself into one of his works as the head of Goliath in his painting David with the Head of Goliath which dates from 1610.




I found kind of funny how so many people (mostly Frary shippers) keep saying Monde shouldn’t happen because they are cousins.

But the funny thing is… After Franci’s dead Mary marry one of her cousins. Lmao

History people. Reign is written on the 1550’s at that time it wasn’t even weird. Many people used it, specially royalty to keep their own blood. AND speaking about the canon on the show, the writers haven’t aknoledge that Louis and Mary are cousins at all.

Woman in a Red Dress by Giovanni Battista Moroni, ca 1560 Italy, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister

Why this guy isn’t remembered as one of the greatest artists of the Renaissance is beyond me.

The dress looks pretty similar to this one, which was also from the early 1560’s in Italy.  It was displayed on a statue of Mary:

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