120-mph

Here’s proof that Black Lives Matter are a bunch of terrorists. 

Black Lives Matter activist Fausto Lopez was driving his car at almost 120 MPH when he was pulled over by a police officer. He was arrested for it. But because of his sense of entitlement, he believed that he should be able to get away with breaking the law, so he got 88 of his Black Lives Matter buddies to harass, stalk, and threaten the officer who arrested him.

Does that make you believe that Black Lives Matter are a terrorist organization?

Well guess what. Fausto Lopez is not a Black Lives Matter activist. He’s a police officer. His privilege as a police officer made him feel entitled to breaking the law and he expected other police officers to agree with him. But instead, one brave police officer dared to cross the thin blue line, and 88 cops got mad at her and decided to stalk, harass, and threaten her.

Does that make you believe that the police are a terrorist organization? If not, why not? You were perfectly fine with judging an entire group when you thought it was Black Lives Matter.

I wonder how many racist conservatives I can trick into reblogging this because they only read the first sentence.

  • teens in a ya novels: we drove down the highway in my mom's stolen bmw going 120 mph and singing along to obscure japnese songs after pulling off the perfect robbery at fort knox
  • teens in real life: we had math homework???

how to take notes

hello! in celebration for 50 followers i’m doing my first masterpost! this is amazing to me, because thats more than twice the amount of people at my school. mind blown 

anyways, this post is about taking notes. now, to take the pretty notes that make our hearts flutter, most people start out with basic and even messy looking notes and then rewrite. personally, my classes go at a very slow pace and i write pretty quickly, so i have a basic template already copied into my notebook and ready to fill in during class. but, i’ve been in classes where the teacher talks at 120 mph and there’s no way you can take “good” notes in-class. so, here we go!

some pretty/helpful notes:

key:
^_^ = generic help
<3 = note type a example
:) = note type b example
✿ = note type c example

~

^_^ 
^_^ 
^_^
<3
<3 
:)
:)
:)
:) 
 

I. in class


step 1:

have a notebook/paper and supplies

  • pencils
  • eraser
  • notebook/paper
  • highlighter (optional)
  • yeah that’s pretty much it

step 2:

get writing!

  • if there are slides or a slideshow, you can ask the teacher to send you the slideshow. that way you don’t have to take notes on it. only do this if its a very nice teacher though!!
  • decide what is important.
  • if i’m going to re-write my notes at home, i like to write down everything the teacher says. then, at home i can choose what to include.
  •      pros: you get all the information and can learn more from your notes
  •      cons: its a lot of things to write down and your hand may cramp :(
  • you could also just write down what seems important
  •      pros: its a lot quicker and easier.
  •      cons: you may miss key information based on your judgement of the statement.

step 3:

categorize

  • have ways to tell the difference between information.
  • when i do this i have 2 pieces of paper on the desk.
  1. fold them in half.
  2. information paper:
  3. on one half write all the very important information.
  4. on the other write the other information.
  5. clarification paper
  6. on one half write all definitions.
  7. on the other write vocabulary or any other information.
  • you can also underline, circle, highlight, or any other distinctive markings to categorize information.

II. at home

step 1:

supplies!

  • pencils
  • notebook/loose leaf paper
  • erasers
  • pens
  • highlighters
  • mildliners
  • fineliners
  • any supplies can be substituted with whatever you have :)


step 2:

plan

  • since i re-write in pen (you can do whatever you’d like), i like to plan out the notes on another sheet of paper using pencil and then do the “real” thing when it looks perfect on the planning paper.
  • make sure you have a place for everything.
  • you don’t want to be writing everything in pen and then realize you forgot to leave space for definitions or something silly.


step 3:

drawing it out

  • of course, everyone has their own style, but there is a very common style on tumblr. this doesn’t include all types, but the 3 main types i see.

type a - cute-sy

  • bubble-y writing
  • a large ribbon banner as the title or all-caps highlight w/dark cursive through it
  • geometric/linear highlighted subhead
  • doodles scattered on paper 
  •      click  for examples 
  • ribbon/bubble/cloud/girly headers

type b - simple

  • neat writing (any writing style)
  • two different types of headers
  • very simple and plain
  • very artsy, complicated, and often cursive
  • literally thats it
  • its so easy and nice

type c - mind map

  • the most artistic/pretty (sometimes)
  • any writing style
  • start with bubble/cloud around title/topic
  • basically just make lines coming out
  • and connect them to more bubbles
  • you can do different shapes depending on the information type

step 4:

decorate

  • add doodles
  • highlight
  •      do this strategically
  •      if you only do it for aesthetics that can be really confusing
  • underline
  •      again
  •      make sure that what you are doing makes sense
  • use sticky notes/page flags

step 5:

studying

  • study however you might normally study
  •      or use the pomodoro technique
  •      there are lots of different ways to study that you could use
  • if you get bored
  •      take small breaks
  •      draw cute lil stick figures saying important info

wow! that was long, but i hope you guys enjoyed it or were helped by it! be sure to message me requests or anything you’d like to see!

accs mentioned:

@studypetals @divergent-i @mediocrestudyblr @studeity @studyforuwc @georgistudies @acadehmic @studyandfocus @freakygeekclique @mindpalacestudy @haleystudies tysm for having such amazing resources!

Ramblings of a fanboy

King Butterfly thought Star and Marco were dating but also showed he was okay with it. He could run at speeds of at least 120 mph so if he didn’t like Marco he could have easily taken Marco out. Also Marco didn’t deny it the first time. Also this show will be the death of me.

Achieving this was not as easy as one might think in this age of actors working more closely with green screens than each other. When Abrams tried to create the skydiving scene with CGI by suspending Kirk and Sulu upside-down for hours in front of a green screen, things got understandably miserable very quickly. It’s not fun or easy to do anything upside-down for long stretches, although we imagine it helped the actors mime the inner “This suuuuuuuuucks!” gold needed to make the scene convincing. Regular skydivers fall at a face-stretching 120-ish mph (200 mph if they go headfirst like Kirk), and although it’s a blast if you like rocketing toward the ground with nothing but a big piece of silk to stop you from becoming one with the earth, no part of that is in any way comfortable. (Trust us, half of this article’s authors have tried it.)

Clearly, throwing Chris Pine, John Cho, and Other Dude Who Dies out of an airplane wasn’t going to cut it. So J.J. pulled out Occam’s Razor and slashed through all the fancy stunt work, because it turns out our eyes could do all the work for him with a little help from a few big fans and a couple of mirrors.

Abrams shot the sequence by having the actors stand on the mirrors and putting his cameramen on ladders so they could shoot from a downward angle. The result was a convincing stunt that needed zero alterations in post-production and cost virtually nothing compared to what it would have taken to shoot the scene any other way.

7 Movie Moments Made Using Stuff Lying Around Your House

youtube

!!!HARD!!!

120 mph (192 km/h) Crash Test (1080p)

When Driver Error Becomes Programming Error

by Joel N. Shurkin, Inside Science

Ninety percent of automobile accidents now involve human error. If scientists succeed in producing computer-driven cars, responsibility may shift to programming errors. In that case, who sues whom? Who is liable?

Scientists working on computer-driven cars – so-called autonomous vehicles – are dealing with issues Henry Ford never worried about, and the technology is ahead of the law.

Google has several fully autonomous cars roaming the streets of California.

In some ways it already is happening by steps. Most new cars have anti-lock braking systems, self-adjusting cruise control, traction control, and computers that can slam on the brakes when it detects an imminent collision. The driver just enjoys the ride.

Meanwhile, experimental autonomous cars get better.

Keep reading

An Interview with the Leap Frogs

We got the opportunity to talk to three members of the Navy’s Parachute Team – “The Leap Frogs” after their jump into X Games Austin this afternoon. Check out the interview below with Brandon (SO1), Timmy (SO1), and Duncan (Lt. [SEAL])

How was the jump today?

Brandon: It was great; we were up at 6,000 feet, going about 120 mph. We could see the skyline of Austin, and then below was the X Games crowd. We loved hearing the crowd cheering.


When and how did you join the Navy?

Brandon: 2008. I was going to college and was wondering what to do – do I stay in college or join the Navy? My family made me finish, but I knew as soon as I was done I was going to enlist.

Timmy: 2005. I enlisted after a year of college. I knew I wanted to be a SEAL. I went to SEAL Team One after all my training and had four deployments while there. I just got back from Afghanistan and joined up with the Leap Frogs early this year.

Duncan: I started at the Naval Academy in 2005. I followed a friend of mine from growing up to the Naval Academy and learned about Naval Special Warfare while I was there my freshmen year. Every year there are 25 available billets to BUD/s for seniors and I knew that’s what I wanted.


When did you jump for the first time?

Brandon: Part of our training regimen is called SQT – SEAL Qualification Training. While we are going through that program (it’s before we go to a SEAL team) we got to free fall school for two months. While you’re there you jump anywhere between 25 and 50 times. You get familiar with rucksacks and combat equipment, oxygen, etc. Our graduation jump includes oxygen, a weapon, a rucksack, and it’s at night, with your team. Once you accomplish that you’ve finished free fall school.


What was going through your head the first time you ever jumped?

Brandon: A funny joke we tell is that most guys jump with their eyes closed, so it’s like a night jump. Then when you open your eyes you realize it’s day time and you pull your canopy at the last moment.

Duncan: All I thought was “Pull my canopy, pull my canopy, pull my canopy!”

Timmy: I went through emergency procedures in my head the whole time.


Why did you choose the Navy?

Timmy: The SEAL teams were the number one pull for me. SEAL = Sea, Air, and Land, that aspect of being able to do it all.

Brandon: Same reason. For me it was trying to find the program that I thought was the most challenging for myself, and it seemed like the Navy SEAL program was the best to challenge myself to the fullest extent.

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Want to see their jump? You can watch the first person perspective video on our Facebook page.