12 century

10

fake show meme: 

 SALADIN (7 SEASONS) 

A fake show consisting of seven seasons spanning from the early exhibitions and life of the Kurdish Muslim sultan, Saladin during the Ayyubid Dynasty. Starting from his conquering of Syria, Egypt, Yemen, and victory over the Crusades. Spanning from early life to his death, ending with two of his seventeen sons succeeding him.  insp.

5

★ Another week, another miniature scene ★

This is what I imagine my future study to look like, complete with a non-functioning old timey telephone and spinny globe. Everything is handmade with the exception of the telephone, which I modified a teeny tiny bit.

I’ve also improved on my globe design (the dramatic arc of the first one and thick black lines just weren’t working, ya know?), and am now offering it in my etsy shop for all your miniature decor and gifting needs. 

Lastly, I’m running a small giveaway on my instagram (@honey.thistle) for one of these globes and a few other minis until May 22nd 2017, so check that out for some free miniature swag :)

Art prompts/cool things to sketch part one

1. Mermaids 

2. your otp, person A is a lost traveller, person B is a spirit trying to lure them 

3. eyes with landscapes in the iris 

4. your best friend 

5. your family as vampires/the addams family 

6. pastel goth au 

7. a magic forest

8. a drawing of anything, but only using 2-3 colours 

9. one half of your otp dying in the others arms 

10. a pet

11. how someone would look if they lived in the 18th century 

12. steampunk au 

13. dancing in the rain 

14. a mermaid sitting on a rock in the ocean while a storm rages 

15. fairies 

16. the reunion of people who haven’t seen each other in a long time 

17. otp at christmas 

18.otp at halloween 

19. What the star signs would look like in human form 

20. a bride with a bouquet of wildflowers 

21. pirates 

22. yourself in the world of your favourite book 

23. a summery portrait of someone grinning 

24. a perfect place

25. ghosts 

26. coffee shop au 

27. an argument 

28. 80′s fashion 

29. silhouettes and sunsets 

30. its raining and your otp have to share a one person umbrella 

31. beach walks 

32. space 

33. what your pet would look like as a human 

34. classic characters (such as oliver twist) in modern day clothing 

35. punk! 

36. blocks of colour and how they blend

37. a pretty spot in your neighbourhood 

38. what the inside of your mind looks like 

39. autumn leaves 

40. copy from an old polaroid picture 

41. top in each others clothes

42. angel/human relationships 

43. gay anything 

44. hands 

45. your favourite flower 

46. a masked ball 

47. do a blind drawing, then fix the mistakes with a different colour

48. cacti 

49. happy place 

50. view from inside as it rains 

An Informal Guide to the Vampire Chronicles: Part 1

Transcribed from the Appendix in Prince Lestat (edited with more info.)

1. Interview with the Vampire (1976) - In this, the first published memoirs of a vampire with his tribe, Louis de Pointe du Lac tells his life story to a reporter boy he encounters in San Francisco - Daniel Molloy. Born in the eighteenth century in Louisiana, Louis, a rich plantation owner, encounters the mysterious Lestat de Lioncourt, who offers him immortality through the Blood and Louis accepts- beginning a long spiritual search for the meaning of who and what he has become. The child vampire Claudia and the mysterious Armand of the Théâtre des Vampires are central to this story, including the death of Claudia at the hands of the theatre run by Armand- devastating and further plummeting Louis into his own quiet misery.

2. The Vampire Lestat (1985) - Here, Lestat de Lioncourt offers his full autobiography - recounting his in eighteenth century France as a penniless provincial aristocrat, a Parisian stage actor, and finally as a vampire in conflict with other members of the Undead, including the coven of the Children of Satan (or Darkness) being led by the vampire Armand. After a long physical and spiritual journey, Lestat reveals ancients secrets about the vampire tribe that he kept for more than a century, learned by an encounter with the Roman vampire Marius- a keeper of the king and queen of their kind, “Those Who Must Be Kept.” Emerging as a rock star and rock video maker, he eagerly attempts to start a war with humankind that might bring the Undead together and end in vampiric annihilation.

3. The Queen of the Damned (1988) - Though written by Lestat, this story includes multiple points of view from mortals and immortals all over the planet, responding to Lestat’s revealing rock music and videos, which awaken the six thousand year old Queen of the Vampires, Akasha, from her long slumber. As the younger unassociated vampires gather at Lestat’s rock concert to assassinate him, they are set aflame by the Queen Akasha, who steals Lestat away and reveals her plan to recreate the world in her vision, as a Goddess of mortals. But an ancient prophecy concerning twins witches, seeking to take revenge on Akasha for the creation of their kind, is set into motion which sweeps old and new Undead into a Great Gathering to save their kind. This is the first book to deal with the entire tribe of the Undead around the world. This novel contains the first inclusion of the mysterious order of mortal scholars known as the Talamasca, who study the paranormal.

4. The Tale of the Body Thief (1992) - Lestat’s memoir in which he recounts his disastrous encounter with a clever and sinister mortal named Raglan James, a sorcerer experienced in switching bodies - a battle which forces Lestat into closer involvement with his friend, David Talbot, Superior General of the Talamasca, who scholarly members are dedicated to the study of the paranormal. As Lestat realizes the second taste of mortality does not satisfy him, he and David work together to defeat Raglan James and in the process, gain his body back and turn David into one of the many Undead.

5. Memnoch the Devil (1995) - Lestat narrates a personal adventure, this time filled with devastating shocks and mysteries as he confronts a powerful spirit, Memnoch, claiming to be none other than the Devil of Christian lore, the fallen angel himself, who invites Lestat to journey with him to Heaven and Hell, and seeks to enlist Lestat as a helper of the Christian realm. Dragged into his own rendition of the Divine Comedy, he reemerges with a taste of the Christ’s blood and Veronica’s Veil, to which other vampires Mael and Armand surrender themselves to the sun as martyrs to their newfound faith.

6. Pandora (1998) -  Published under the series title “New Tales of the Vampires”, this story is Pandora’s (introduced in TVL & QOTD) autobiographical confession, recounting her life in the ancient Roman Empire during the time of Augustus and Tiberius, including her great and tragic love affair with the vampire Marius and the creating of her two fledglings, the Athenian Flavius and Arjun, an Indian prince of the Chola dynasty. Though it does recount later events, the book is principally focused on Pandora’s first century as a vampire.

7. The Vampire Armand  (1998) - Here, Armand, a profound and enigmatic presence in earlier novels, offers his autobiography to the reader, explaining his long life since the time of the Renaissance when he was kidnapped from the monks in Kiev and trafficked to Venice as a child sex slave, only to be rescued by the ancient and powerful vampire Marius. Yet another kidnapping by the vampire Santino puts Armand in the hands of the cruel and notorious Children of Satan, superstitious vampires who worship the Devil. A story of survival and love, he explains his point of view of meeting Lestat and his fledglings and the comfort founded in his two mortal saviors after his attempted suicide in Memnoch. Though Armand concludes his story in the present time and introduces new characters to the Chronicles, most of the account focuses on his earlier years.

8. Vittorio The Vampire (1999) - One of the “New Tales of the Vampires,” this is the autobiography of Vittorio of Tuscany, who becomes a member of the Undead during the Renaissance who finds a way to survive after the murder of his family by a coven of Undead who hunt him down after making him one of them. This character does not appear anywhere else in the Vampire Chronicles, but he is of the same tribe and does share the same cosmology.

9. Merrick (2000) - Told by David Talbot, this story is centered on Merrick, a Creole woman of colors from an old New Orleans family and a member of the Talamasca, who seeks to become a vampire during the last years before the end of the twentieth century. She uses her powers to put a spell upon both David and Louis, eventually summoning the spirit of the child vampire Claudia for Louis to bring him closure. This is a hybrid novel, involving a glimpse of a few characters from another series of books devoted to the history of the Mayfair witches of New Orleans to whom Merrick is related, but it is principally focuses on Merrick’s involvement with the Undead, including Louis de Pointe du Lac.

10. Blood and Gold (2001) - Another in the series of vampire memoirs, this time written by the ancient Roman Marius (introduced in TVL) who is the caretaker of Armand’s only fledging, the young reporter boy Daniel Molloy from the first novel. He explains much about his two thousand years amongst the Undead and the challenges he faced in protecting the mystery of “Those Who Must Be Kept”, the ancient parents of the tribe, Akasha and Enkil. Marius offers his side of the story of his tumultuous love affairs with Pandora, Armand, the courtesan Bianca Solderini, and his conflicts with other vampires. This novel concludes in the present but is principally focused on the past.

11. Blackwood Farm (2002) - A hybrid novel narrated by Quinn Blackwood recounting his personal history and involvement with the ever present Talamasca, the Undead, and the Mayfair witches of New Orleans, who figure in another book series. It follows the tale of his kidnapping by the cruel hermaphroditic vampire Petronia, his turning, and the haunting spirit of his dead twin brother Goblin. Set in a brief period of time in the early twenty first century.

12. Blood Canticle (2003) - Another hybrid book, narrated by Lestat, recounting his adventures with Quinn Blackwood and with the Mayfair witches. Following the tale of the newly turned Mona Mayfair, the story includes the Mayfair witches enlisting the help of ancient vampires Maharet, Mekare, and Khayman along with Lestat to help their battle against an advanced human species called Taltos. This story focuses on a brief period of time in the twenty first century.

13. Prince Lestat (2014) - The return of Lestat after years of silence. Many voices and points of view reveal the crisis of the worldwide tribe of the Undead. Vampires have been proliferating out of control; burnings have commenced all over the world, huge massacres similar to those carried out by Akasha in The Queen of the Damned… Old vampires, roused from slumber in the Earth, are doing the bidding of a Voice commanding that they indiscriminately burn vampire-mavericks in cities from Paris and Mumbai to Hong Kong, Kyoto, and San Francisco. A regathering of the so-called Coven of the Articulate from which the former novels are penned, along with a new set of supernatural beings meet to discover the source of the Voice, the spirit Amel, the very sacred core of the Undead. 

5

Chokyi Lodro and Milarepa. Tibet. 1500s.

In Tibetan Buddhism the specific lineage of teachers of each school is carefully documented through sets of paintings. The lineage always begins with a divine figure and then shows Indian teachers followed by Tibetan teachers in chronological order. This painting is part of a larger set of twelve paintings. Tibetan hanging scrolls, known as thangkas, were often commissioned by patrons who would decide how many paintings to include in the set. The series was commissioned during the life of the Karmapa Wangchug Dorje (1555-1603).

Marpa, the founder of the Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism, was born in southern Tibet in 1021 CE. He studied Buddhism as a child and later set out to study further in India

Milarepa is one of the most beloved yogi-poets in Tibet and was Marpa’s foremost disciple. Born in 1052 CE, his father died and his greedy uncle and aunt forced Milarepa to work as a slave. He learned black magic and murdered them to avenge this injustice. However, he regretted his violent actions and sought a Buddhist teacher to redeem himself.

Forty-six Buddha Figures The top registers and sides of the painting contain forty-six buddha figures, who, despite their different colored robes, all represent the Buddha Shakyamuni. They are a portion of the one thousand buddhas of the present age. The full set of paintings depicts all one thousand of them.

Meditational Deities Between and outside of the two central figures of this painting are several forms of Hevajra, a deity specific to this tradition. Hevajra is a personal meditational deity, or yidam. As meditational buddhas, yidam serve to symbolize through their colors, forms, attributes, and gestures the path of Tantric Buddhism, which seeks a rapid path to enlightenment (top to bottom). -Rubin Art Museum

anonymous asked:

apparently because of the era mulan was in she should've spoken cantonese (or at least not mandarin) so why is mandarin the default chinese now?

hoo boy, this is a major misconception that i’ve heard a lot, especially from Cantonese speakers, who somehow believe that all people in pre-1000 AD China would’ve been speaking Cantonese ahahaha. I think this is an urban myth from some pseudo-linguistics rumours making its rounds in Cantonese-speaking communities over the last couple generations, probably stemming from the fact that Cantonese phonology is more conservative than Mandarin in terms of our syllable-final consonants, and the preservation of the voiced/voiceless distinction in Middle Chinese by extending our tonal inventory. A lot of people think that that automatically makes Cantonese the “pure Chinese language”, which makes me cringe really hard tbh, bc that’s not how languages work LOL. 

The problem with the Sinitic languages is that we have no exact way of knowing when and how people spoke back in the day, and the characters give no 100% explicit phonetic clues, so the best we can use as reference are the rime tables that some smart Chinese linguists compiled way back in the day. The most famous one is the book of Qieyun rime tables, which helped modern linguists re-construct Middle Chinese forms. Middle Chinese is said to generally have been spoken around the 6th-11th century, or somewhere around that range, and the Qieyun tables were published sometime in the 6th century, so they would’ve reflected an early Middle Chinese variety that functioned as a standard language in that time period. The problem is that outside of this standard language, people in China were already speaking their own Sinitic languages like they are today, some of which were already mutually unintelligible from one another. Unfortunately, there’s no way to track exactly what languages were spoken because all we have are the rime tables.

The early forms of the modern varieties that we know today as Mandarin, Cantonese, Hakka, Wu, etc all split off from Late Middle Chinese presumably sometime between the 12th and 13th century, some languages later than others ofc (except for Hokkien and the other Min varieties, who had a bit of a special development, but that’s a different story). Mulan (who btw was a legendary character; we’re not even 100% sure if she actually existed) apparently lived during the Southern and Northern Dynasty period, which lasted from 420–589, which would fall into the Middle Chinese period, more specifically in the Early-Mid Middle Chinese period, so she probably would not have spoken anything close to Cantonese OR Mandarin in her time. 

Another problem is that Mulan is said to have been from the Northern Wei Dynasty (北魏), which would’ve taken up the area north of the Yangtze River. Cantonese was historically spoken in southern China, particularly in the general regions of modern-day Guangdong and Guangxi. Guangzhou was always a very successful port city, even 1500 years ago, and became a very important cultural center even in the Southern Song Dynasty (particularly in the 12-13th century). In this time period, an early form of Cantonese had already developed, and it was also around this time that it gained a literary level to read the Chinese Classics. Therefore, it seems highly highly highly improbable that Mulan was a Cantonese speaker, considering that her time period and general geographical location did not even come close to matching the timeline of Cantonese or any other modern Sinitic variety. 

Also to answer your question about why Mandarin is the standard today: it comes from a place of political power. Nanjing and Beijing (lit. Southern Capital and Northern Capital) were always the place of political power, and in courts they would use a standard language so that there could be communication between officials from all over China, hence the formal name for Mandarin: 官話 (lit. ‘official speech’). And that continued throughout history, simply because Beijing was always the source of political power, and made decisions for the country. However, the implementation of Mandarin as the ‘national language’ in all parts of China was a relatively recent event (around the mid-1900′s), in comparison to the entire history of the Chinese languages. Before Mandarin was heavily implemented in almost all parts of China, most people were still speaking local varieties, which would have mainly consisted of developing forms of modern Sinitic varieties. 

TL;DR - Nope, contrary to popular belief, Mulan most likely did not speak Cantonese, and neither did a lot of early famous Chinese figures like Confucius, Mencius, Laozi, etc. 

Portrait Illustration of Lāl Kunwar, the beloved of the 8-th Mughal Emperor Jahandār Shāh (d. 1125 AH / 1713 CE).

Mughal color-wash drawing, dating to the 12-th century AH / 18-th CE

Originally a dancing girl, she became Jahandār’s concubine and later the queen consort.

anonymous asked:

K but can you imagine the chaos if LL bots fell for a human with a healing factor? Ya fall off of a bot. Multiple people scream when ya hit the ground, hearing a crunch. They think you're dead for a little bit, until one of the docs are like, "wait their body is regenerating?? Really fast????" And then you just,, wake up and yELL

I think if it were possible to take years of life off a Cybertronian, the whole ship would have collectively lost like 12 centuries between them.  XD

They might ease up a bit after that, but that doesn’t mean they still wouldn’t be super protective.  After all, just because you can regenerate a limb or two doesn’t mean they want you to be in that kind of situation in the first place.  (Except Whirl.  Whirl wants to see you do the hand thing again, because that shit was awesome!)