101st infantry

Members of the ‘Filthy Thirteen’ 101st Airborne, sport Indian-style mohawks and apply war paint to one another before going into battle, June 5, 1944.

The Filthy Thirteen was the name given to the 1st Demolition Section of the Regimental Headquarters Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, of the United States Army, which fought in the European campaign in World War II. The Demolition Section was assigned and trained to demolish enemy targets behind the lines. They were ordered to secure or destroy the bridges over the Douve River during the Normandy Invasion of Europe in June 1944. Half were either killed, wounded or captured, but they accomplished their mission. This unit was best known for the famous photo which appeared in Stars and Stripes, showing two members wearing Indian-style “mohawks” and applying war paint to one another. The inspiration for this came from unit sergeant Jake McNiece, who was part Choctaw.

Walter Gordon, Floyd Talbert, John Eubanks, unknown, Francis Mellet of Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment in the 101st Airborne Division. D-Day

US Soldiers of 327th Glider Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne in Rue du Quai À Vin, Carentan, Normandy. June 12-14th 1944

Carentan was defended by two battalions of Fallschirmjäger-Regiment 6 (6th Parachute Regiment) of the 2nd Fallschirmjäger-Division and two Ost battalions. The 17th SS Panzergrenadier Division, ordered to reinforce Carentan, was delayed by transport shortages and attacks by Allied aircraft. The attacking 101st Airborne Division landed by parachute on 6 June as part of the American airborne landings in Normandy, was ordered to seize Carentan.

In the ensuing battle, the 101st forced passage across the causeway into Carentan on 10 and 11 June. A lack of ammunition forced the German forces to withdraw on 12 June. The 17th SS PzG Division counter-attacked the 101st Airborne on 13 June. Initially successful, its attack was thrown back by Combat Command A (CCA) of the U.S. 2nd Armored Division.

(Colourised by Marina Amiral from Brazil)

Zero Hour

It’s 1:30AM,
Tuesday morning.
June 6th, 2017,
Seventy-three years ago.
The planes took off,
England to France.
24,000 men.
Rendezvous with destiny.
Yet,
I was not there.

It’s 6:30AM,
June 6th, 2017.
I missed the boat,
Seventy-three years ago.
A 50 mile stretch,
An Atlantic wall.
160,000 men.
No Mission Too Difficult. No Sacrifice Too Great. Duty First!
Yet,
I was not there.

You know,
There are very few left.
Who waded onto the beaches,
During the low tide.
You know,
There are very few left.
Who dropped from the sky,
Like damned angles of death.
You know,
None of us were there.

It get’s lost in translation,
The generation has passed.
Seventy-three years ago,
Tuesday, June 6th, 1944.
0 Hour, D-Day,
A force of liberation.
184,000 soldiers,
A Band of Brothers.
Lost,
But not forgotten.

Unbroken and 10 More Great Movies About World War II

Based on the best-selling non-fiction book “Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption" by Laura Hillenbrand, Angelina Jolie’s acclaimed film “Unbroken” joins a long tradition of cinema’s interest in the intricate details of World War II.

Unlike many of the other films, however, “Unbroken" narrows its focus on the impact that one individual, USA Olympian and athlete Louis Zamperini, had on the hearts and minds of hundreds of other people in and around the war. For that reason, the film stands as an interesting look at one of the world’s most fascinating events and individuals.

With Unbroken available on Digital HD now, and arriving on Blu-ray, and DVD on March 24, we’ve put together a list of 10 moregreat movies about World War II that you need to check out.

Keep reading

Famous photo of General Dwight D. Eisenhower addressing American paratroopers prior to D-Day.

“Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the order of the Day. ‘Full victory-nothing less’ to paratroopers in England, just before they board their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe.” Eisenhower is meeting with US Co. E, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment (Strike) of the 101st Airborne Division, photo taken at Greenham Common Airfield in England about 8:30 p.m. on June 5, 1944. The General was talking about fly fishing with his men as he always did before a stressful operation.

Lt Wallace C. Strobel is seen wearing the number 23 around his neck.

The Filthy Thirteen were a sub-unit within the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, better known as the “Screaming Eagles” who descended on Hitler’s Fortress Europe with the 82nd Airborne during the wee-hours of D-Day for some early-morning foreplay. … Their specialty was blowing the shit out of bridges and whatever else they figured could go “boom” if they strapped it to enough TNT, which caused a nightmare for the Germans as they tried in vain to fend off the Allied invasion. … Their fearless leader Jake McNiece was part Native-American, and his fellow Filthies chose to honor this by going into battle sporting mohawks like Travis Bickle, and freaking war-paint. … At the age of 23, [McNiece] delivered this nugget of advice from the enlisting officer:

“You may just be 23. I don’t know, but your face and your head looks like it’s been used as practice for hand grenade tossing and wore out three bodies already.”

If that’s not some movie shit, we don’t know what is. Wait, yes we do, this quote from fellow Filthy Thirteener Robert Cone regarding the D-Day mission:

“We landed near a hedgerow, from which the Germans were firing at us, and the guy I was with was killed. I got hit in the right shoulder, which broke my arm all the way down into the forearm. The bullet was lodged in there for a year. I was able to get away, though, but could not hold my rifle.”

The 94 Most Badass Soldiers Who Ever Lived

Richard D. Winters (January 21st, 1918 - January 2nd, 2011) was a United States Officer in the Army and a decorated war veteran. He commanded E Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, during World War 2. He was a very handsome man during his young days and it defiantly added to his amazing personality and courage if you have ever seen the movie Band Of Brothers. He helped many others during the 2nd World War and was an amazing soldier. There is no denying. He was a hottie back in th late 30’s and 40’s.