1000photoaday

1000th photo-a-day countdown!

Wow, we’re just 5 days away from posting our 1000th Polaroid. Damn, that’s a lot of pictures. In celebration of this milestone we decided to take this week to turn our lenses around toward the unsung heroes of this site, the cameras. Without these temperamental prehistoric beasts, this blog would simply not exist.

So without further ado, we would like to introduce to you Genesis and Boss, the beginning and the end.

We started this site with only one camera, an eBay-scored Polaroid 220 Land Camera we named Genesis. We learned the art of the Land Camera with Genesis, the ins and outs. He was a workhorse, shouldering an entire blog on his vintage shoulders for well over a year. He still works surprisingly well, but we’ve since acquired a family of cameras that now help share the load.

Boss fell into our stable quite recently, he’s a Polaroid 100 Land Camera. When other cameras were failing us left and right, Boss stepped up to the plate. We needed a responsible, reliable camera, and with his glass lenses and heavy metal body, Boss is just that. He’s a no frills kind of guy, but he’ll never let you down.

Tomorrow, we’ll meet the SX70 that first sparked our love affair with integral film cameras.

3 away from 1000!

Shooting a photo-a-day basically requires you have a camera on you at all times, and Felix here goes everywhere with us.

One of the main distinctions between this Polaroid SX70 Sonar OneStep and a regular SX70 is the strange apparatus located above the lens. This is known as an electrostatic transducer, and is Polaroid’s cutting edge (circa 1978) autofocus system. Using sonar technology, the camera sends out a series of chirps that hit its subject and bounce back to the camera, telling it exactly where to focus. After all these years the technology is surprisingly accurate!

This camera is a dream to use and would be a great first camera for anyone interested in getting into instant photography.

Photo #997

After our first year of Polaroids, we wanted to switch things up a bit. Prior to acquiring this mint SX70, we had shot exclusively with Land Cameras and pack film. Anyone familiar with the SX70 knows that the integral film camera is an entirely different beast. Part of our hesitation with the SX70 may have been the high cost of film, and after that there was definitely a bit of a learning curve. However, we finally found our groove and now there is no putting this camera down.

Perhaps more than with other Polaroids, there is a particular brand of joy and heartbreak that comes with shooting with an SX70. The balance one must strike to achieve desirable results is very delicate, and there’s no way to get a handle on this other than to take a ton of pictures. And while the last of the expired Polaroid film is rapidly disappearing, the Impossible Project line of films has greatly improved and expanded, making owning one of these babies now more fun than ever.