10 years is an estimate

The Family of Man

1955’s The Family of Man, an ambitious exhibition that brought together hundreds of images by photographers working around the world, was a forthright declaration of global solidarity in the decade following World War II. The exhibition, organized by noted photographer and director of MoMA’s Department of Photography Edward Steichen, took the form of a photo essay celebrating the universal aspects of the human experience. Steichen had invited photographers to submit photographs for consideration, explaining that his aim was to capture “the gamut of life from birth to death”—a task for which, he argued, photography was uniquely suited. The exhibition toured the world for eight years, attracting an estimated 10 million visitors. See the full installation and more on our website as part of our exhibition history.

Trust

(Lin x Reader)

This is my first fanfic so sorry it’s bad. It’s not that long but I am continuing this. 

WARNINGS: Might suck


I’ve known Lin long enough to know that he is the number one person I can go to for anything and trust him with it. He was the first person I told when my parents had gotten divorced when I was only in the sixth grade. My father had been having an affair with his assistant for little over a year, and needless to say in the end he left my mom and I for her. Lin was always supportive in everything I did and I was the same way with him. We both went into theater together when we were in middle school and that’s where it all began. 

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CBO released a revised estimate for Republicans’ health care plan. It somehow got worse.
The new official analysis of the American Health Care Act, taking into account recent amendments from House leadership submitted late Monday night, still shows the number of uninsured would increase by an estimated 24 million people — but this time the bill will reduce the deficit by even less. “As a result of those amendments, this estimate shows smaller savings over the next 10 years than the estimate that CBO issued on March 13 for the reconciliation recommendations of the House Committee on Ways and Means and the House Committee on Energy and Commerce,” the Congressional Budget Office reported Thursday afternoon, the same day the House of Representatives originally intended to vote on the bill. The analysis also showed that the revised bill would not fix the 15 to 20 percent increase in premiums in 2018 and 2019 estimated in the CBO score of the first bill. Read more

Cat s Eye Wide and Deep : The Cats Eye Nebula is one of the best known planetary nebulae in the sky. Its more familiar outlines are seen in the brighter central region of the nebula in this impressive wide-angle view. But the composite image combines many short and long exposures to also reveal an extremely faint outer halo. At an estimated distance of 3,000 light-years, the faint outer halo is over 5 light-years across. Planetary nebulae have long been appreciated as a final phase in the life of a sun-like star. More recently, some planetary nebulae are found to have halos like this one, likely formed of material shrugged off during earlier episodes in the stars evolution. While the planetary nebula phase is thought to last for around 10,000 years, astronomers estimate the age of the outer filamentary portions of this halo to be 50,000 to 90,000 years. Visible on the left, some 50 million light-years beyond the watchful planetary nebula, lies spiral galaxy NGC 6552. via NASA

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Fossilization is an extremely rare event.

To appreciate this point, consider that there are 10 specimens of the first bird to appear in the fossil record, Archaeopteryx.

All were found in the same site in Germany where limestone is quarried for printmaking (the bird species name is lithographica). If you accept an estimate that crow-sized birds native to wetland habitats in northern Europe would have a population of around 10,000 and a life span of 10 years, and if you accept the current estimate that the species existed for about two million years, then you can calculate that about two billion Archaeopteryx lived.

But as far as researchers currently know, only 1 out of every 200,000,000 individuals fossilized. For this species, the odds of becoming a fossil were almost 40 times worse than your odds are of winning the grand prize in a provincial lottery.

—  Biological Science, Second Canadian Edition (Textbook); Freeman, Harrington, Sharp

The Cat’s Eye Nebula (NGC 6543) is one of the best known planetary nebulae in the sky. Its more familiar outlines are seen in the brighter central region of the nebula in this impressive wide-angle view. But the composite image combines many short and long exposures to also reveal an extremely faint outer halo. At an estimated distance of 3,000 light-years, the faint outer halo is over 5 light-years across. Planetary nebulae have long been appreciated as a final phase in the life of a sun-like star. More recently, some planetary nebulae are found to have halos like this one, likely formed of material shrugged off during earlier episodes in the star’s evolution. While the planetary nebula phase is thought to last for around 10,000 years, astronomers estimate the age of the outer filamentary portions of this halo to be 50,000 to 90,000 years. Visible on the left, some 50 million light-years beyond the watchful planetary nebula, lies spiral galaxy NGC 6552.

Image Credit & Copyright: Josh Smith

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One of the old favorite doomsday scenarios is that Earth’s magnetic poles will realign themselves, causing worldwide destruction and the end of humanity as we know it. While researchers say the death and destruction part of that theory is unlikely, what they are in agreement about is that Earth’s magnetic poles are realigning. 

A recent study from the European Space Agency found that Earth’s magnetic fields are actually weakening at what some might consider an alarming rate. New measurements put the rate of magnetic field decay at around five percent per year, which is about 10 times faster than previous estimates. 

The decay is also not uniform. Some spots are decaying faster, while in other areas, the magnetic field is strengthening. Researchers familiar with Earth’s magnetic field aren’t worried, though. They say these recent measurements are proof that Earth’s poles are preparing to flip. The last time Earth’s poles switched was during the Stone Age, so it’s unclear what kind of impact a flip would have on life in our modern era.

Listening To A City: Explaining Breathtaking Decay In Havana

Miguel Coyula pointed at an open door in the middle of Old Havana. The mahogany door was ornate, the concrete facade had lost most of its paint.

“That’s marble,” Coyula said pointing to the treads of the staircase. “They are the remnants of something that was very glorious.”

We were taking a walk with Coyula, an architect and urban planner, through Obispo Street, which he called the spine of Old Havana. There the colonial buildings crowd narrow streets. It’s vibrant and filled with people.

Some buildings are in great shape, but this is an old city, said Coyula, with a housing stock that averages 70 years old. The housing authority, Coyula said, estimates that 10 percent of buildings in Havana are in bad shape, but reality tells a different story.

Most of the buildings along the main avenues are in OK shape, but as soon as you turn off into the residential streets, the decay is breathtaking.

Coyula says there are lots of reasons for the vast degradation of Havana: People don’t have money to fix their homes; the U.S. embargo makes it difficult for the government to step in; the socialist system instituted on the island is too expensive and has created a society used to paternalism.  

We stop next to an old church. It used be where sailors came to be blessed before a long journey. It’s an old building made of stone that has been blackened by time.

“The city is talking,” Coyula says.

He points toward a three-story building on the other side of the church. On the balconies, its residents have hung clothes and an old lady is hunched over the rusted rail, peering at the square. The building is in such bad shape, that it has been condemned, but there are still people living in it.

Coyula points to the apartment in the upper left corner of the building. Someone, he said, has taken the time and invested the money — not an insignificant endeavor in Cuba — to paint just the outside wall of their apartment.

“If you tell people in Havana to pay a fee for the maintenance of a building they will say, ‘No, I don’t own the building. I own the apartment,” Coyula said. So all over Havana, you’ll see buildings that look ready to crumble with hopeful splashes of paint.

In other words, at least when it comes to buildings in this socialist country, individualism has outstripped collectivism. And in a city like Havana, where most people live in apartment buildings, that’s a serious problem.

“It’s like baseball,” Coyula said, resorting to the country’s favorite allegory. Like a Texas leaguer, the overall maintenance of buildings in the city has gotten lost somewhere between the government and individual.

— Eyder Peralta 

It’s weird that I don’t hear the people who always hammer on Bernie Sanders for his sometimes shoddy math going after Trump for claiming that he can both balance the budget and pay for a $9.5 trillion dollar tax plan (10-year estimate) by cutting waste, fraud, and abuse. Even if he found other cuts, we’re talking about something in the ballpark of $1 trillion dollars a year. And he wants to pay for it through cutting waste, fraud, and abuse.