1.5 mm

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 INKTOBER / collector’s set
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with original illustrations from #Inktober (2016) ©Lolle

LIMITED EDITION ✳ yay!! Best of my #Inktober 2016 illustrations in a awesome Collector’s set *:・゚✧
* only 3 available

♡ the set includes :
a “BEST OF INKTOBER” mini-print
- size : A5 // hand-singed // digitally printed (laser jet) on high quality 200gr paper
a set of 4 INKTOBER POSTCARDS  
- size: A6 (about 145mm x 100 mm) // digital print (laser-jet) on paper 300 gr and hand-cut with love
a set of INKTOBER STICKERS (black and white)
- a series of 16 illustrated stickers ♥ black and white //  size: from about 0.78" to 2.7" inches // digitally printed on high quality matte self-adhesive paper (200gr) and hand-cut with love by me
a SILLY BAT enamel pin
- size : about 30mm  // finish : hard enamel pin / silver plated // colors : silver & black
a LITTLE TOOTH mini-patch
- size : about 45 mm // material : felt (1.5 mm + base 1.5mm), cotton embroidery thread, magic & love
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INSTRUCTIONS : please hand-sew your new patches with care on clothes not frequently washed // like denim jackets, coats, bags …
dry clean only

♦ + a unique ♡ hand-painted mini tag ♡ // posca markers on black cardboard ©Lolle // a different tag for each set

It’s me & I’m back with another new AU despite having 10+ WIPs in my drafts!! (Why am I like this??? RIP) Ok so I’ve got a Rosa/Gina Cake Shop AU fic in the works, but since that’s predictably going to take forever for me to finish, here is a list of headcanons for a Jake/Amy version of that AU: 

  • Charles owns and runs Niko’s (the only cake shop in Brooklyn to boast having the best mouth-feel), and Amy is his acclaimed cake decorator. 
    • She’s not allowed to touch anything that’s uncooked or not made for decorating; even the buttercream frosting and the fondant icing she uses are made by Charles.
  • The first time Jake comes into the store, he’s super frazzled because he completely forgot he volunteered to bring cake for the precinct’s annual picnic. 
    • Charles is worried they won’t be able to finish a Perfect cake by noon, but he accepts the order anyway and even waives the extra rush fee. (”I got you, Jakey! Leave it to me!”)  
    • Amy is Not Pleased because she is the one who has to figure out how they’re going to get a cake chilled, frosted, and decorated in less than an hour. She’s never one to back down from an organizational challenge though, and she manages to get the cake boxed and ready a whole 4 minutes before Jake comes by to pick it up. 
  • Jake becomes a regular at Niko’s and always has the most ridiculous orders.
    • He quickly picks up that Amy is a Type A Perfectionist, so he’s always like, “Alright, today I want… a lopsided cake, tilted exactly 1.5 mm to one side, with a sugar flower 0.78 cm off-center. Oh, and make sure it’s sliced unevenly!”
    • Amy is appropriately infuriated, but she’s all for fulfilling oddly specific instructions. 
  • Let’s be honest, all the cake orders land Jake in crushing debt. After he makes his 20th order in two months, Charles starts to get concerned about his finances and starts creating the weirdest discounts/promos.
    • ”50% off for all NYPD detectives whose first names begin with J!” 
    • “Buy one, get one cake free if you come wearing a leather jacket!!”
    • “Free cake decorating class if you can quote 20 minutes of Die Hard!” (“Charles, I did not agree to teach this!!!” “AMY, YOU GOTTA.”)
  • One day, Jake comes in to order a Get Well Soon! cake for his mom, and there is so much love in his descriptions that Amy’s like… Damn.
    • He orders a multi-tier cake and brings in three messy crayon drawings as samples for how each cake layer should be decorated. (”Try not to look too impressed, but these are my earliest masterpieces from my days as a young kindergartner… I stole them from my mom’s fridge while she was napping yesterday.”)
    • He makes Amy promise on her favorite icing pen that she won’t forget the details on Graham Crackers’s shell. (”This was the last portrait I drew of my dear turtle before he got married and moved in with his wife. Do not ruin this, Amy!”) 
    • She puts her heart and soul into decorating this cake (possibly even more effort than when she decorated her brother Luis’ wedding cake), and the photo of the finished product definitely gets filed in her portfolio of best works. 
  • If Amy were to be completely honest, beyond all of Jake’s stupid requests, he’s actually one of the most Earnest and Pure people she knows.
    • He once overheard Charles stressing over a messed up delivery arrangement and offered to drive the cakes himself. (”Boyle, I can turn on my sirens and be there in no time!”)
    • He periodically brings coffee for everyone, not just Amy and Charles. He’s even got the janitor’s regular order memorized. 
    • He got word that Nikolaj’s birthday was coming up, so he put in a secret order for a truck-themed cake. (“Is there a way you can make sure Charles doesn’t find out about this? It’s gotta be a surprise!!!”) 
  • The first time Jake sees Amy in anything other than her chef’s coat is at Nikolaj’s birthday party, and it’s totally jarring for him. 
    • He thought she looked pretty in her pristine white uniform with her hair in a neat bun, but when she’s in a red dress and her hair’s all shiny, soft, and let down like that… wow.
    • He def trips over his words for a good full minute, and Amy just giggles and does the Double Tuck. 
  • Jake walks in one Saturday afternoon, and Amy immediately gets her notebook and pen out cause oh boy, this is gonna be another doozy. 
    • After she says she’s ready to take down his order, he blurts out in one breath: “doyouwannagotothemuseumwithme?”
    • Amy may have been president of her high school’s stenographer’s club, but even she’s not fast enough to jot all of that down. ”Wait, slow down, I didn’t catch that. Did you say museum?”
    • Jake obviously did not mean for that to be on an actual cake, so he’s just like, “………………. Ames.” 
    • She looks up, and he’s got this shy adorable grin on his face, and then it hits her. “OH. OH. Uhm. Yes? Yes!! I- I’m off in 15??????” 
    • Charles is watching this entire exchange from the kitchen (he’s got the door cracked open about an inch, just enough for him to hear everything) and he’s SQUEALING because America’s dream couple is finally getting together!!!!!!!!!!!

All the love to @the-pontiac-bandit​ and @jakelovesamy for helping me with some of these and to @elsaclack and @proofthatihaveaheart for listening to me yell about this! ♥♥♥

Leatherworking Lecture: Casing

Hey, wow, I just hit 500 followers, thought I’d say thanks to everyone out there who’s stalking me and do something to celebrate. So here, guys, have something nice – have, uhh… *digs through closet* …a tutorial on how to prepare leather for tooling & shaping! :D

Greetings! Today I shall deliver an excessively long lecture on casing, aka, getting leather properly wet in order to carve it, tool it, and mold it. (You will be astounded how many words I have to say on the subject of “get it wet.”) This is not the most glamorous part of leatherworking, but it is an important one – properly cased leather will give you better results on your finished product, and also make it easier and more fun. Working with good, properly-cased leather is a genuine joy – working with cheap or badly-cased leather is an exercise in frustration.

I haven’t really found anywhere else that puts all this information in one place. Other people have talked extensively about tooling, because that’s the fun part, but I’ve never found a comprehensive guide to casing. When newbies get on leatherworking forums, etc, and ask for advice on casing, the old-timers tend to say things like “You’ll learn to tell when it’s properly cased” or “You’ll get a feel for it” – which is true, but not all that helpful when you’re first starting out.

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“The Honeycomb Heart”, Salvador Dali

Technique: 18 karat yellow gold; On the pin, 13-14 carat yellow gold; Diamonds (13), diamond cut (round) and 8/8, of 1.5 to 3.0 mm in diameter approximately; Natural rubies (corundum), mixed cut (round and oval) of 2.0 to 4.5 mm approximately

“There’s a little bit of sweetness in the heart of every woman,” quoted Dali.  With this in mind, he created the ‘honeycomb heart’. Honey cluster in the middle of the heart represents this sweetness.  The heart was made by Charles Vaillant from Dali’s designs in 1953-54 and were retailed by Alemany & Ertman located  at 745 Fifth Avenue in New York.

why are bolters always said to be impossible for a human to fire due to recoil?

grenade launchers use a bullet 1.5 caliber (40 mm) in width, more than a heavy bolter by half an inch, and can be used very easily by humans, albeit semiautomatically. The large size of a bolter (I’m sure most of that metal is extraneous) reduces the recoil, and the fact the bolt only needs to leave the barrel before the rocket kicks in, further reducing powder needed and thus recoil, means they should be able to be used by a regular joe Guardsman without power armor.


Life as a Microscopist -  Q & A with Igor Siwanowicz

“Life as a microscopist” is a series about men and women behind the microscopes. I was very honored to exchange a few messages with Igor Siwanowicz - scientist, photographer and microscopist - who gives us some insight into the biology of the tiny organisms he likes to study, and how he became interested in them and in microscopy. It was all so interesting, I kept everything. Enjoy.

1) About your winning entry at the Nikon Small World: can you tell us more about that organism?

Aquatic bladderworts prefer clean, nutrient-poor ponds and lakes; they satisfy their nitrogen needs by trapping minute prey – water fleas, copepods, rotifers etc.  – in specialized organs called bladders, which are considered the most sophisticated trapping organs in the plant kingdom, a true testimony to evolution’s ingenuity.

Finding the specimen was one of those serendipitous events – I stumbled upon bladderwort while collecting dragonfly nymphs for my research in a pond located few miles away from my institute (Janelia Research Campus of HHMI in Ashburn, Virginia). Perhaps it is the perversion of the role reversal when a plant is devouring an animal that makes flesh-eating plants so interesting; I have been fascinated with carnivorous plants since early childhood – watching “Little Shop of Horrors” might have something to do with igniting my fascination. Admittedly, bladderwort is – at the first glance - far less spectacular than, say, a Venus flytrap or a pitcher plant; when magnified though its trap reveals amazing complexity.
I had a very fruitful run with this plant – with the samples I collected I was able to produce a series of images, and several of them won prizes.

This pictures depicts the awesomeness of the bladderwort trapping organ and scored the 1st place in 2013 Olympus Bioscapes contest.
The image shows the inside of a trap of the aquatic carnivorous plant, humped bladderwort (Utricularia gibba). Several elements of the bladder’s construction are visible in the image, giving some insight into working of this tiny – only 1.5 mm long – but elaborate suction trap. The driving force behind the trapping mechanism is hydrostatic pressure: the plant “cocks” the trap by pumping water out of the bladder, accumulating potential energy in its thick and flexible walls like in the limbs of a bow. Specialized cells called bifid and quadrifid glands are responsible for the task of active transport of water. They line the inner walls and are visible in the image as bright-blue elongated shapes. An unsuspecting prey – usually a tiny aquatic arthropod – is guided toward the trapdoor by antenna-like branches surrounding the entrance. Quite literally, the trap has a “hair trigger” – touching one of the trigger hair cells extending from the bottom of the trapdoor (their bases are visible right in the center of the upper half as 4 small bright circles; they are much better visible in the Nikon contest image where you can see the entrance to the trap (or the bladderwort’s “mouth”)) causes the entrance – or “valve” – to bulge inward. Once the equilibrium is disturbed, the walls rapidly spring back to their initial position and the prey is sucked in within a millisecond (1/1000th of a second), experiencing acceleration of 500 G! In the image, the valve resembles a mosaic-covered Byzantine arch; it is made of a single layer of tiny, densely packed cells regularly arranged in concentric fashion. Once inside, the prey dies of anoxia and is digested by enzymes secreted by the bifid and quadrifid glands.

The intricately shaped objects visible in the lower part of the image are those aforementioned green algae called desmids; two species belonging to the genus Micrasterias and three species of Staurastrum can be identified. Various authors have described algae in Utricularia traps as commensals (algae that thrive and propagate in the nutrient-rich interior of the trap), symbionts (bladderwort benefits from the carbohydrates produced by algae) or as prey. Recent studies show that algae are able to survive only inside older, inactive traps; more than 90% are killed inside vivid, young traps. It may be that late in the season when I collected the specimens, most of the traps were already inactive, which could explain why the trapped desmids seemed to be doing fine.

2) How did you start in the field of microscopy? Do you think that microscopy can be considered a form of art?

My interest in natural sciences and nature photography were developing simultaneously - my parents are biologists and I grew up surrounded by biology textbooks. I enjoyed browsing through the illustrations and photographs long before I learned how to read. It wasn’t until 14 years ago – 2 years into my PhD studies - that I bought my first camera and found myself on the supply side of nature photography, with the special focus on macro technique. I quickly realized that microscopy would perfectly complement that activity and give me an even more intimate perspective of my “models.”

Six years ago - after abandoning protein biochemistry and moving to the field of neurobiology - I finally gained an access to a confocal microscope. For the past four years I’m spending most of my working hours imaging various bits of invertebrate anatomy – mostly dragonflies, since that is our group’s model organism. In this way I managed to merge my extracurricular expertise of macro photography and insect anatomy with scientific approach.

Although it is not the primary objective of scientific visual data, surprisingly many research-related images have aesthetic merit; to fully appreciate the beauty of those often abstract and surreal forms one needs to approach them with an open mind. A French polymath and philosopher of science Jules Henri Poincare said that “the scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful”. Not many scientists these days have the privilege and comfort to apply this somewhat utopist approach to their research, but lots do share the appreciation of beauty and are fully aware of the aesthetic aspects of their work. The marriage of scientific approach and artistic talent can be best exemplified by awe-inspiring work of Ernst Haeckel, who’s “Artforms from Nature” is a continuous source of inspiration for me.

Olympus And Nikon contests are organized with such people in mind. Images are rewarded for the artistic merit and visual aspects on par with and often above their scientific importance; that definitely grants those contests a broad appeal among non-experts and contributes to redeeming the image of science as a somber, wonder-less, unexciting affair utterly unintelligible for a layperson.

A bit about sample preparation and data collecting:

Back in the laboratory I embedded isolated traps in agar-agar gel and cut them into 0.5 mm-thick slices with a vibrating razor blade. Due to the chance component inherent to the process, in only 6 out of two dozen or so specimens, the razor passed either through the midline to produce two nearly equal halves, or through the plane parallel to the bladder’s trapdoor – a satisfactory success rate.

To produce the image, I used a laser scanning confocal microscope, a device that collects images in a very different way than a brightfield microscope (your standard biology class microscope). The confocal microscope is a fluorescent microscope; it means that the imaged specimen is illuminated (excited) with light of certain wavelength and emits light of a different, longer wavelength. The source of the excitatory light is a laser; a confocal microscope can be equipped with several lasers producing light of different frequencies (i.e., wavelength, or simply color), since each fluorescent molecule (a pigment that emits light) used in research only absorbs certain specific wavelengths of light. The specimen is illuminated, point by point, by a focused laser beam that moves somewhat like an electron beam producing the familiar scanned image on the phosphorescent surface of a cathode-tube TV or computer monitor. The light emitted from the specimen is collected by the objective and passes through a pinhole aperture that cuts off stray rays of light arriving from fragments of the sample that are not in focus – only light that is emitted from the very thin area (optical slice) within the focal plane can pass. Emitted light is then detected by the microscope’s photodetector (photomultiplier), and the image is reconstructed – point by point – on the computer screen. Because most specimens are much thicker than the focal plane, a series of images - called a “stack” - is collected by moving the specimen up or down. From those images, a three-dimensional image of the sample can be reconstructed.

In most cases samples have to be made fluorescent by the use of dyes or conjugated antibodies specifically binding certain intra- or extracellular structures. To be able to image cellulose (building material of plant’s cell walls) I used Calcofluor White, a dye first used in the textile industry for its propensity for binding cellulose fibers but then abandoned because of its toxicity; Calcofluor still finds use in medicine for identification of fungal pathogens in animal tissues.

A confocal microscope “sees” the sample very differently than we do - to our eyes the specimens appear very different than the final image. The amount of ultraviolet light in sunlight is – fortunately! – too low to appreciably excite Calcofluor, and all we see is green from the natural pigment chlorophyll. When illuminated with UV light (405 nm), the dye present in cell walls glows bluish-green. The same short wavelength light is absorbed by chlorophyll, which emits red light.

To produce the image, I recorded emission in three channels (colors) simultaneously. Assignment of the color in the captured image to any given channel is purely arbitrary; however, I do assign blue to the channel recording light of the shortest wavelength, green and red in similar fashion, in the “natural” order. Combining the three channels - three prime color images – into one produces the whole palette of colors – in effect, it is like the microscope had trichromatic “vision,” just as we do.

Bonus : Rotifers !

Thanks a lot to Igor Siwanowicz for all the information, kind words and amazing images.
The series #life as a microscopist can be seen on frontal-cortex.tumblr.com

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Third iteration of my handcut Maclaurin series concertina cards, this time for cos(x), and I REALLY like solid monochrome panels as opposed to white borders with colored graph lines. This one’s only 1.05 m long. I think the only thing I’d change is I’d make the borders 2 mm instead of 1.5 mm and make the graph lines thicker.

Made this one on bristol board instead of that cheapo Hobby Lobby poster board, much less scraggly graph lines this time!

Cameo appearance by my weird mega dork cat Niels Bohr in the top photo I guess.

Herb of the Week-Mesquite

Common names

Algarroba
American Carob
Huarango
Kiawe
Mesquite
A leguminous plant, Prosopis pallida is one of the mesquite tree species. This plant is indigenous to Ecuador, Colombia and Peru, especially in the arid coastal regions. Although its existence is threatened in its place of origin, in several other places, mesquite is thought to be a very invasive species. Mesquite trees are very common in the American southwest.

Mesquite is basically a very large tree that often grows up to a height of anything between 8 meters and 20 meters, while the width of its trunk is usually about 80 cm across. It also has a very long life when grown in suitable conditions. However, the plant is reduced to the size of a shrub when grown in infertile land where there is a scarcity of water. The trunk is irregularly fuste, twisted as well as knotty. The external bark of the plant has a brown-gray-blackish color and is fissured having woody rhytidome, which often has spines. The inner bark of the tree is white and red hued. It has a bitter and varnish scented fiber-like texture.

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vimeo

♥ yay! take a closer look at my M A N E K I n e k o hand-embroidered patch
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it will be available again by request on lOll3SHOP from the next week

MATERIALS : felt (1.5 mm + base 3mm), cotton embroidery thread, magic & love
SIZE : 12.2" x 9" inches

processing time : ½ weeks // price : €75.20 + shipping

✳ available from may 9 2016 // to purchase one just request a custom order on lOll3SHOP

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Concrete Comes Alive

by Michael Keller

This is the first view of Digistone, a project to make informational video screens out of concrete embedded with fiber optics. The European Commission-funded program’s goal is to embed these screens in city and road surfaces to create intelligent signs for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians.

The prototype blocks above were on display at the 2014 Euroscience Open Forum being held now in Copenhagen, just days after their creators got them working for the first time. The polymer fiber optics are spaced three millimeters apart and create a clear image five feet away. The team making it, comprised of a consortium of companies and institutions, aim to soon decrease the space between fiber optic fibers to 1.5 mm, which will make the image sharper. Read more below.

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Human embryonic stage 9 occurs during week 3 between 19 to 21 days. The embryo is now 1.5 to 2.5 mm in size and somites have begun to form and number between 1 to 3 somite pairs during this stage.

Ectoderm - Neural plate brain region continues to expand, neural plate begins folding over the notochord. Gastrulation continues through the primitive streak region.

Mesoderm - Paraxial mesoderm segmentation into somites begins (1 - 3 somite pairs). Lateral plate mesoderm begins to vacuolate, dividing it into somatic and splanchnic mesoderm and to later form the intra-embryonic coelom. Prechordal splanchnic mesoderm begins to form the cardiogenic region, from which the primordial heart will develop.

Endoderm - Notochordal plate still visible which will form the notochord. Endoderm is still widely open to the yolk sac and germ cells form part of this layer. Extra-embryonic mesoderm on the yolk sac surface begins to form “blood islands”.