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DIY: mini knotted plant hanger

If you’re scrambling for a last-minute gift, or are haunted by endless blank walls and empty spaces, this quick craft is your solution. 

Start simply with some rope and a plant of your choosing. I typically go for thinner rope, which makes for daintier hangings.

Cut 4 pieces of rope about 2.5 times what you envision your final product to be. 

Fold the ropes in half to create a loop and tie a knot. This will serve as your hanger. 

After the top knot is complete, begin your first row of knots by tying two adjacent strings together. Repeat this pattern until each rope is tied to the one next to it. 

For your next row, tie knots a couple inches below the row above, using one string from each pair to make a new knot. Be sure that you continue to use adjacent ropes so that the knots continue a circular pattern. 

You can pick any amount of knotted rings you’d like. The width that the knots are apart from one another depend on the width of your plant. For example, if your plant is smaller, you may want to make the rows of knots closer together to create a weaved look around your plant. 

Finally, tie one knot at the bottom of the plant hanger using all of the strings, similar to how you made the top (just without the loop). 

Your final product should be a variation of the plant hanger pictured below

You can utilize different textures and make them in multiples - they sure look good together. 

I hope this little demonstration pumps some inspiration into your bloodstream. Happy crafting!

Tying a knot can be tricky. Just ask any kid struggling with shoelaces. And scientists have it even harder when they try to make knots using tiny molecules.

Now, in the journal Science, a team of chemists says it has made a huge advance — manipulating molecules to create the tightest knot ever.

“Historically, knotting and weaving have led to all kinds of breakthrough technologies,” says David Leigh at the University of Manchester in the U.K., who notes that knots led to prehistoric innovations such as fishing nets and clothes. “Knots should be just as important at the molecular level, but we can’t exploit that until we learn how to make them, and that’s really what we’re beginning to do.”

Scientists Have Twisted Molecules Into The Tightest Knot Ever

Image: Stuart Jantzen/Biocinematics.com/Science

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